J. Lawrence Aber
Willner Family Professor in Psychology and Public Policy, and University Professor

Lawrence Aber is Willner Family Professor in Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, and University Professor, New York University. Dr Aber earned his Ph.D. from Yale University and an A.B. from Harvard University. He previously taught at Barnard College, Columbia University, and at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, where he also directed the National Center for Children in Poverty. He is an internationally recognized expert in child development and social policy and has co-edited Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children (1997, Russell Sage Foundation), Assessing the Impact of September 11th 2001 on Children Youth and Parents: Lessons for Applied Developmental Science (2004, Erlbaum) and Child Development and Social Policy: Knowledge for Action (2007, APA Publications). His basic research examines the influence of poverty and violence, at the family and community levels, on the social, emotional, behavioral, cognitive and academic development of children and youth. Dr. Aber also designs and conducts rigorous evaluations of innovative programs and policies for children, youth and families, such as violence prevention, literacy development, welfare reform and comprehensive services initiatives. Dr. Aber testifies frequently before Congress, state legislatures and other deliberative policy forums. The media, public officials, private foundations and leading non-profit organizations also frequently seek his opinion or advice about pressing matters concerning child and family well-being.  In 2006, Dr. Aber was appointed by the Mayor of New York City to the Commission for Economic Opportunity, an initiative to help reduce poverty and increase economic opportunity in New York City.  In 2007, Dr. Aber served as the Nannerl O. Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professor at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  In 2008 and 2009, he served part-time as Visiting Research Professor in Evidence-based Social Interventions in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work, University of Oxford.  He is also Chair of the Board of the Children's Institute, University of Cape Town, South Africa; and served as consultant to the World Bank on its project, "Children and Youth in Crisis".  From 2003-2006, Dr. Aber chaired the Advisory Board, International Network on Children and Armed Conflict of the Social Science Research Council, in collaboration with the Special Representative to the Secretary General of the United Nations on Children and Armed Conflict and UNICEF. Currently, he conducts research on the impact of poverty and HIV/AIDS on children's development in South Africa (in collaboration with the Human Sciences Research Council), and on school- and community-based interventions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (in collaboration with the International Rescue Committee).

Date Publication/Paper
2013

Blustein, Jan, Teresa M Attina, Laura Cox, Mengling Liu, Andrew M Ryan, Martin M Blaser, Leonardo Trasande. 2013. Association of Caesarean Delivery with Child Adiposity from Age 6 Weeks to 15 Years International Journal of Obesity, Jul;37(7):900-6.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess associations of caesarean section with body mass from birth through adolescence.

DESIGN: Longitudinal birth cohort study, following subjects up to 15 years of age.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Children born in 1991-1992 in Avon, UK who participated in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n=10 219).

OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome: standardized measures of body mass (weight-for length z-scores at 6 weeks, 10 and 20 months; and body mass index (BMI) z-scores at 38 months, 7, 9, 11 and 15 years). Secondary outcome: categorical overweight or obese (BMI 85th percentile) for age and gender, at 38 months, 7, 9, 11 and 15 years.

RESULTS: Of the 10 219 children, 926 (9.06%) were delivered by caesarean section. Those born by caesarean had lower-birth weights than those born vaginally (-46.1 g, 95% confidence interval(CI): 14.6-77.6 g; P=0.004). In mixed multivariable models adjusting for birth weight, gender, parental body mass, family sociodemographics, gestational factors and infant feeding patterns, caesarean delivery was consistently associated with increased adiposity, starting at 6 weeks (+0.11 s.d. units, 95% CI: 0.03-0.18; P=0.005), through age 15 (BMI z-score increment+0.10 s.d. units, 95% CI: 0.001-0.198; P=0.042). By age 11 caesarean-delivered children had 1.83 times the odds of overweight or obesity (95% CI: 1.24-2.70; P=0.002). When the sample was stratified by maternal pre-pregnancy weight, the association among children born of overweight/obese mothers was strong and long-lasting. In contrast, evidence of an association among children born of normal-weight mothers was weak.

CONCLUSION: Caesarean delivery is associated with increased body mass in childhood and adolescence. Research is needed to further characterize the association in children of normal weight women. Additional work is also needed to understand the mechanism underlying the association, which may involve relatively enduring changes in the intestinal microbiome.

2012

Godfrey, E.B., Osher, D., Williams, L.D., Wolf, S., Berg, J.K., Torrente, C., Spier, E., & J.L. Aber. 2012. Cross-national measurement of school learning environments: Creating indicators for evaluating UNICEF’s Child Friendly Schools Initiative Children and Youth Services Review, 34(3): 546-557
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Abstract

The present study examines the psychometric properties of a student-reported measure of school quality, the CFS Conditions for Learning Survey, to examine its utility as a cross-national comparative measure to evaluate UNICEF's Child Friendly Schools initiative. Factor analyses conducted on data from fifth- and sixth-grade students in 68 schools across the Philippines, Nicaragua, and South Africa revealed a core set of items that loaded highly onto each of the three dimensions of the CFS Conditions for Learning survey across all three countries. Formal tests established measurement invariance for a subset of these items, indicating that they were free from methodological bias across countries. However, meaningful differences in the country-specific structure and substantive interpretation of school quality were also detected. The results suggest that items in the CFS Conditions for Learning survey can be used to create both reliable cross-national and country-specific indicators of school quality and provide a blueprint for future psychometric work in the field of comparative child and family policy.

2011

Aber, L., Brown, J.L, & Jones, S.M., Berg, J. & C. Torrente. 2011. School-based strategies to prevent violence, trauma and psychopathology: The challenges of going to scale Development and Psychopathology, 23(2), 411-421
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Abstract

Children's trauma-related mental health problems are widespread, largely untreated and constitute significant barriers to academic achievement and attainment. Translational research has begun to identify school-based interventions to prevent violence, trauma and psychopathology. We describe in detail the findings to date on research evaluating one such intervention, the Reading, Writing, Respect, and Resolution (4Rs) Program. The 4Rs Program has led to modest positive impacts on both classrooms and children after 1 year that appear to cascade to more impacts in other domains of children's development after 2 years. This research strives not only to translate research into practice but also translate practice into research. However, considerable challenges must be met for such research to inform prevention strategies at population scale.

Jones, S.M., Brown, J.L., & J.L. Aber. 2011. Two-Year Impacts of a Universal School-Based Social-Emotional and Literacy Intervention: An Experiment in Translational Developmental Research Child Development, 82(2): 533-554
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Abstract

This study contributes to ongoing scholarship at the nexus of translational research, education reform, and the developmental and prevention sciences. It reports 2-year experimental impacts of a universal, integrated school-based intervention in social-emotional learning and literacy development on children’s social-emotional, behavioral, and academic functioning. The study employed a school-randomized, experimental design with 1,184 children in 18 elementary schools. Children in the intervention schools showed improvements across several domains: self-reports of hostile attributional bias, aggressive interpersonal negotiation strategies, and depression, and teacher reports of attention skills, and aggressive and socially competent behavior. In addition, there were effects of the intervention on children’s math and reading achievement for those identified by teachers at baseline at highest behavioral risk. These findings are interpreted in light of developmental cascades theory and lend support to the value of universal, integrated interventions in the elementary school period for promoting children’s social-emotional and academic skills.

Aber, J.L., & L.B. Rawlings. 2011. North-South Knowledge Sharing on Incentive-based Conditional Cash Transfer Programs SP Discussion Paper No. 1101. Washington, DC: The World Bank.
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Abstract

Over the last decade, Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) programs have become one of the most widely adopted anti-poverty initiatives in the developing world. Inspired particularly by Mexico's successful program, CCTs are viewed as an effective way to provide basic income support while building children's human capital. These programs have had a remarkable global expansion, from a handful programs in the late 1990s to programs in close to 30 countries today, including a demonstration program in the United States. In contrast to many other safety net programs in developing countries, CCTs have been closely studied and well evaluated, creating both a strong evidence base from which to inform policy decisions and an active global community of practice. This paper first reviews the emergence of CCTs in the context of a key theme in welfare reform, notably using incentives to promote human capital development, going beyond the traditional focus on income support. The paper then examines what has been learned to date from the experience with CCTs in the South and raises a series of questions concerning the relevance and replicability of these lessons in other contexts. The paper concludes with a call for further knowledge sharing in two areas: between the North and South as the experience with welfare reform and CCTs in particular expands, and between behavioral science and welfare policy.

2010

Jones, S.M., Brown, J.L, Hoglund, W.L.G., & J.L. Aber. 2010. A School-Randomized Clinical Trial of an Integrated Social-Emotional Learning and Literacy Intervention: Impacts on Third-Grade Outcomes Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 78(6): 829-842
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Abstract

Objective: To report experimental impacts of a universal, integrated school-based intervention in social–emotional learning and literacy development on change over 1 school year in 3rd-grade children's social–emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes. Method: This study employed a school-randomized, experimental design and included 942 3rd-grade children (49% boys; 45.6% Hispanic/Latino, 41.1% Black/African American, 4.7% non-Hispanic White, and 8.6% other racial/ethnic groups, including Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American) in 18 New York City public elementary schools. Data on children's social–cognitive processes (e.g., hostile attribution biases), behavioral symptomatology (e.g., conduct problems), and literacy skills and academic achievement (e.g., reading achievement) were collected in the fall and spring of 1 school year. Results: There were main effects of the 4Rs Program after 1 year on only 2 of the 13 outcomes examined. These include children's self-reports of hostile attributional biases (Cohen's d = 0.20) and depression ( d = 0.24). As expected based on program and developmental theory, there were impacts of the intervention for those children identified by teachers at baseline with the highest levels of aggression ( d = 0.32–0.59) on 4 other outcomes: children's self-reports of aggressive fantasies, teacher reports of academic skills, reading achievement scaled scores, and children's attendance. Conclusions: This report of effects of the 4Rs intervention on individual children across domains of functioning after 1 school year represents an important first step in establishing a better understanding of what is achievable by a schoolwide intervention such as the 4Rs in its earliest stages of unfolding. The first-year impacts, combined with our knowledge of sustained and expanded effects after a second year, provide evidence that this intervention may be initiating positive developmental cascades both in the general population of students and among those at highest behavioral risk.

Gershoff, E.T., Aber, J.L., Ware, A., & J.A. Kotler. 2010. Exposure to 9/11 Among Youth and Their Mothers in New York City: Enduring Associations with Mental Health and Sociopolitical Attitudes Child Development, 81(4): 1141-1160
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Abstract

The enduring impact of exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on mental health and sociopolitical attitudes was examined in a sample of 427 adolescents (= 16.20 years) and their mothers residing in New York City. Direct exposure to the terrorist attack was associated with youth depression symptoms and with mothers’ posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. There was no evidence of reciprocal effects of mother exposure on youth or of youth exposure on mothers. Although mothers reported engaging in more emotional processing coping assistance with their children, coping assistance was not associated with youth’s symptomatology. Media exposure was found to be a strong predictor of youth’s and mothers’ sociopolitical attitudes about issues such as prejudice toward immigrants, social mistrust, and current events.

Aber, J.L. & A. Chaudry. 2010. Low-Income Children, Their Families and the Great Recession: What Next in Policy? Prepared for The Georgetown University and Urban Institute Conference on Reducing Poverty and Economic Distress after ARRA
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Abstract

Children and youth vary in their developmental health due to differences in family economic security and exposure to toxic stress. The economic downturn has increased the challenges facing low-income children. The ARRA and the President's first budget made significant down-payments on investments in protecting and promoting the well-being of these children. But some of those investments are temporary and must be built into baselines going forward. Many other promising avenues for policy change could be implemented through reauthorization of PRWORA and ESEA. Further, a new era of experimentation in innovative program and policies is recommended for when the economy recovers.

Brown, J.L., Jones, S.M., LaRusso, M.D., & J.L. Aber. 2010. Improving Classroom Quality: Teacher Influences and Experimental Impacts of the 4Rs Program Journal of Educational Psychology, 102(1), 153-167
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Abstract

This study capitalizes on recent advances in the reliable and valid measurement of classroom-level social processes known to influence children's social–emotional and academic development and addresses a number of limitations in our current understanding of teacher- and intervention-related impacts on elementary school classroom processes. A cluster randomized controlled trial design was employed to (a) examine whether teacher social–emotional functioning forecasts differences in the quality of 3rd-grade classrooms, (b) test the experimental impact of a school-based social–emotional learning and literacy intervention on the quality of classroom processes controlling for teacher social–emotional functioning, and (c) examine whether intervention impacts on classroom quality are moderated by these teacher-related factors. Results indicated (a) positive effects of teachers' perceived emotional ability on classroom quality; (b) positive effects of the 4Rs Program on overall classroom quality, net of teacher social–emotional functioning indicators; and (c) intervention effects that are robust to differences in these teacher factors. These findings support and extend recent research examining intervention-induced changes in classroom-level social processes fundamental to positive youth development.

Aber. L., Brown, J., Jones, S., & T. Roderick. 2010. SEL: The history of a research–practice partnership Better: Evidence-based Education, 2(2), 14-15
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Aber, J.L., Hammond, A.S. & S.M. Thompson. 2010. U.S. Ratification of the CRC and Reducing Child Poverty: Can We Get There from Here? Child Welfare, 89(5): 159-175
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If the United States finally ratifies the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC), will it improve the country's to effectively combat child poverty and thereby improve child well-being? This article addresses this and related questions in two ways. First, the authors examine how ratification of the CRC has influenced the efforts of other wealthy Anglophone countries to reduce child poverty. Second, they draw on lessons learned from these other countries' efforts to generate predictions about America's postratification future. The authors conclude that, while the CRC is a compelling, practical tool, a communications strategy and business plan are necessary complements to achieve desired results.

Aber, J.L, Berg, J., Godfrey, E., & C. Torrente. S.B. Kamerman, S. Phipps & A. Ben Arieh (Eds.). 2010. Using Child Indicators to Influence Policy: A Comparative Case Study From Child Welfare to Child Well-Being: An International Perspective on Knowledge in the Service of Making Policy (pp.189-215). The Netherlands: Springer Science Business Media B.V.
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2009

Aber, J.L. 2009. Experiments in 21st century antipoverty policy Public Policy Research, 16(1): 57-63
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Abstract

New York City is testing a policy of ‘Conditional Cash Transfers’, pioneered in Latin America and designed to address both the reduction of income poverty and investment in children's human capital development. Lawrence Aber examines the welfare policy lessons the NYC experiment might contain for other industrialised countries

Gershoff, E.T., Aber, J.L. & M. Clements. A. Sameroff (Ed.). 2009. Parent Learning Support and Child Reading Ability: A Cross-Lagged Panel Analysis for Developmental Transactions In A. Sameroff (Ed.) The Transactional Model of Development: How Children and Contexts Shape Each Other (pp. 203-220). Washington, DC: APA Books
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LaRusso, M.D., Jones, S.M., Brown, J.L., & J.L. Aber. L.M. Dinella (Ed.). 2009. School Context and Micro-Contexts: The Complexity of Studying School Settings In L.M. Dinella (Ed.) Conducting Science-Based Psychology Research in Schools (pp. 175-197). Washington, DC: APA Books
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Gershoff, E.T., Pederson, S. & J.L. Aber. 2009. Creating Neighborhood Typologies of GIS-Based Data in the Absence of a Neighborhood-Based Sampling: A Factor and Cluster Analytic Strategy Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community, 37(1): 35-47
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Abstract

This article describes an innovative means of identifying a neighborhood typology that can be used for analyses of individual-level data that were not obtained through neighborhood-based sampling. A two-step approach was employed. First, exploratory factor analysis was used to reduce the number of neighborhood indicators to five clear factors of neighborhood characteristics. Second, a cluster analytic procedure was used to identify neighborhood types based on the five factors. These analyses resulted in a parsimonious solution of five distinct neighborhood clusters, or types, that constituted a manageable number of categories that could be used for future analyses of individuals grouped within neighborhood types. This method is a promising way to conduct neighborhood impact analyses that maximize the ability of researchers to characterize neighborhoods accurately (without sampling at the neighborhood level) while retaining the ability to conduct analyses of participants grouped within types of neighborhoods.

2008

Aber, J.L. 2008. A Big, New Investment in America's Poorest (and Youngest?) Children: Conditional Cash Transfers BIG IDEAS For Children: Investing in our Nation's Future (pp. 191-202). Washington, DC: First Focus
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Abstract

Clements, M., Aber, J.L., & E. Seidman. 2008. The Dynamics of Life Stressors and Depressive Symptoms in Early Adolescence: A Test of Six Theoretical Models Child Development 79(4), 1168-1182
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Structural equation modeling was used to compare 6 competing theoretically based psychosocial models of the longitudinal association between life stressors and depressive symptoms in a sample of early adolescents (N= 907; 40% Hispanic, 32% Black, and 19% White; mean age at Time 1 = 11.4 years). Only two models fit the data, both of which included paths modeling the effect of depressive symptoms on stressors recall: The mood-congruent cognitive bias model included only depressive symptoms to life stressors paths (DS→S), whereas the fully transactional model included paths representing both the DS→S and stressors to depressive symptoms (S→DS) effects. Social causation models and the stress generation model did not fit the data. Findings demonstrate the importance of accounting for mood-congruent cognitive bias in stressors–depressive symptoms investigations.

Jones, S.M., Brown, J.L., & J.L. Aber. 2008. Classroom Settings as Targets of Intervention and Research In M. Shinn & H. Yoshikawa (Eds.) Toward Positive Youth Development: Transforming Schools and Community Programs (pp 58-77).  UK: Oxford University PRess, Inc.
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2007

Aber, J.L., D. Phillips, Jones, S.M. & K. Mclearn 2007. Child Development and Social Policy: Knowledge for Action American Psychological Assn.
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Psychologists discuss the influence of social policy on children's development, and the insights and skills that developmental psychologists bring to policy and its process. Among their topics are the role of strategic communications in policy advocacy, from visions to systems of universal pre-kindergarten, new directions in prevention and intervention for teen pregnancy and parenthood, and using the Web to disseminate research and affect public policy.

Gershoff, E.T., Aber, J.L., Raver, C.C. & Lennon, M.C. 2007. Income Is Not Enough: Incorporating Material Hardship Into Models of Income Associations With Parenting and Child Development Child Development, January/February 2007, Volume 78 Issue 1 Page 70-95.
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Although research has clearly established that low family income has negative impacts on children's cognitive skills and social-emotional competence, less often is a family's experience of material hardship considered. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (N=21,255), this study examined dual components of family income and material hardship along with parent mediators of stress, positive parenting, and investment as predictors of 6-year-old children's cognitive skills and social-emotional competence. Support was found for a model that identified unique parent-mediated paths from income to cognitive skills and from income and material hardship to social-emotional competence. The findings have implications for future study of family income and child development and for identification of promising targets for policy intervention.

Raver, C.C. & , Gershoff, E.T. & Aber, J.L. 2007. Testing Equivalence of Mediating Models of Income, Parenting, and School Readiness for White, Black, and Hispanic Children in a National Sample Child Development, January/February 2007, Volume 78, Issue 1, Page 96-115.
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This paper examines complex models of the associations between family income, material hardship, parenting, and school readiness among White, Black, and Hispanic 6-year-olds, using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K). It is critical to test the universality of such complex models, particularly given their implications for intervention, prevention, and public policy. Therefore this study asks: Do measures and models of low income and early school readiness indicators fit differently or similarly for White, Black, and Hispanic children? Measurement equivalence of material hardship, parent stress, parenting behaviors, child cognitive skills, and child social competence is first tested. Model equivalence is then tested by examining whether category membership in a race/ethnic group moderates associations between predictors and young children's school readiness.

2006

Eigsti, I., Zayas, V., Mischel, W., Shoda, Y., Ayduk. O., Dadlani, M.B., Davidson, M.C., Aber, J.L. & Casey, B.J. 2006. Predicting Cognitive Control From Preschool to Late Adolescence and Young Adulthood Psychological Science, June 2006, Vol. 17 Issue 6, p478-484, 7p.
Abstract

In this longitudinal study, the proportion of time preschoolers directed their attention away from rewarding stimuli during a delay-of-gratification task was positively associated with efficiency (greater speed without reduced accuracy) at responding to targets in a go/no-go task more than 10 years later. The overall findings suggest that preschoolers' ability to effectively direct their attention away from tempting aspects of the rewards in a delay-of-gratification task may be a developmental precursor for the ability to perform inhibitory tasks such as the go/no-go task years later. Because performance on the go/no-go task has previously been characterized as involving activation of fronto-striatal regions, the present findings also suggest that performance in the delay-of-gratification task may serve as an early marker of individual differences in the functional integrity of this circuitry.

Appelbaum, L.D., Lennon M.C. & Aber, J.L. 2006. When Effort is Threatening: The Influence of the Belief in a Just World on American's Attitudes Toward Anti-Poverty Policy Political Psychology. .
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In the political context of the reauthorization of federal welfare reform legislation, a nationally representative sample of 1,570 adults in the United States completed a survey examining the factors that affect attitudes and policy preferences with regard to aid for low-income individuals and families in the United States. This study utilized an innovative survey technique, the factorial survey methodology (Rossi & Nock, 1982), which allows for the simultaneous experimental manipulation of a large number of factors through the use of a vignette. This research demonstrates how the portrayal of difficulties faced by people in need and the ways in which they attempt to overcome these difficulties affect support for policies designed to aid low-income individuals and families. In addition, this study of public attitudes considers the role that psychological orientations of the evaluators play in judgments of families in need. In this case, we examined how the evaluators' belief that the world is a just place influences their evaluations of deservingness. Consistent with our expectations, we found that the more efforts the vignette subject engaged in improving her situation, the less deserving of government benefits she was judged to be by respondents with a strong belief in a just world. The reverse was found among respondents with a weaker belief: more efforts were associated with greater judgments of deservingness.

Gershoff, E.T. & Aber, J.L. 2006. Neighborhoods and Schools: Contexts and Consequences for the Mental Health and Risk Behaviors of Children and Youth In L. Balter and C. Tamis-LeMonda (Eds.), Child Psychology: A Handbook of Contemporary Issues (2nd ed.)
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This second edition of Child Psychology: A Handbook of Contemporary Issues reflects the increasingly sophisticated and varied research methods used to examine the highly complex interactions contributing to children's cognitive, emotional, and social development. Those chapters that appeared in the previous edition have been thoroughly updated and new chapters by outstanding researchers have been introduced. In addition, there is an entirely new section on Adolescence and thorough coverage of salient Ecological Influences, which make this second edition a truly comprehensive resource on the important issues in child psychology. The volume is divided into five sections - Infancy, Preschool Years, Childhood, Adolescence, and Ecological Influences - which: * Describe the nature of development and individual variations in developmental trajectories across multiple domains * Identify the processes and mechanisms underlying developmental and contextual change * Explore the varied contexts in which development unfolds, including family, school, neighborhood, and culture * Apply cutting-edge research designs, methodologies, and analytic approaches to models of development The volume provides an invaluable and practical resource for students and instructors on a wide variety of courses, and for researchers and professionals working in the field of child development.

2005

Allen, L., Y. Bat-Chava, Aber, J.L. & Seidman, E. 2005. Adolescent Racial and Ethnic Identity in Context In G. Downey, J. Eccles, & C. Chatman (Eds.), Social identity, coping and life tasks. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, Dec.
Abstract

LaRue Allen, Yael Bat-Chava, J. Lawrence Aber, and Edward Seidman find that the emotional benefit of racial pride for black adolescents is higher in predominantly black neighborhoods than in racially mixed environments.

 

Pedersen, S., Seidman, E., Rivera, A., Allen, L. & Aber, J.L. 2005. Contextual Competence: Multiple Manifestations Among Urban Adolescents American Journal of Community Psychology. Mar Vol. 35, Iss. 1-2; p. 65
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The authors develop and validate multidimensional and contextual profiles of competence among low-income, urban, middle adolescents (N = 560). The assessment of contextual competence was based on youth self-reports of involvement, performance, and relationship quality in the peer, school, athletic, employment, religious, and cultural contexts. A principal components analysis of these engagement indices revealed the six expected components with the addition of a component labeled self-in-context. To identify holistic, multidimensional profiles of contextual competence, scores along the seven domains were cluster analyzed. Nine clusters emerged, each representing a distinct constellation of youth experience. Profiles were associated with demographic variables and youth adjustment. Profiles reflecting high engagement in two or more contexts predicted higher self-esteem and lower depression. In contrast, profiles marked by high engagement in the contexts of athletics or employment predicted more serious delinquency. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for future research and intervention.

Rodriguez, M., Aber, J.L., Mischel, W., Sethi, A. & Shoda, Y. 2005. A Contextual Approach to the Development of Self-Regulatory Competences: Maternal Unresponsiveness and Toddler's Negative Affect in Stressful Situations Social Development, February 2005, Volume 14 Issue 1, Page 136-157.
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A prospective study examined the effects of maternal unresponsivity and of toddlers' own negative affect on the child's subsequent ability to use effective attentional control strategies in preschool. Maternal and child behaviors were measured in situations that varied in the level of stress to test the hypothesis that behaviors in high stress situations would be more diagnostic of children's subsequent self-regulatory behavior. As predicted, both maternal unresponsivity and toddlers' negative affect, particularly in a high stress as opposed to a low stress situation, predicted children's later use of ineffective attentional control strategies. Similarly, maternal disengagement that occurred contingent to toddlers' distress predicted ineffective attentional control strategies whereas maternal disengagement in response to toddlers' non-distress behaviors did not. The findings supported the utility of a contextual approach to understanding the impact of maternal and child characteristics on the development of self-regulatory skills.

2004

Lu, H.H., Palmer, J., Song, Y., Lennon, M.C. & Aber, J.L. 2004. Children Facing Economic Hardship in the United States: Differentials and Changes in the 1990's Demographic Review, June 2004, Vol 10, Article 11.
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Abstract

This paper helps document significant improvements in the child low-income rate as well as the significant decrease in the proportion of children who relied on public assistance in the United States during the 1990s. Many disadvantaged groups of children were less likely to live in poor or low-income families in the late 1990s than such children a decade earlier. The improvement in the child low-income rates of these disadvantaged groups was accompanied by a substantial increase in parental employment. However, parental employment appears to do less to protect children from economic hardship than it did a decade earlier. This paper shows that working families� children in many disadvantaged social groups, especially groups in medium risk ranks�children in families with parents between ages 25 to 29, with parents who only had a high-school diploma, and in father-only families�suffered the largest increase in economic hardship. Our results indicate that the increased odds of falling below low income lines among children in working families facing multiple disadvantaged characteristics and the increased proportion of these children in various subgroups of working families in the 1990s can help explain the increased economic hardship among subgroups in the medium risk ranks listed above. Finally, the paper also notes that the official measure of poverty tends to underestimate low-income rates.

Aber, J.L. & Gershoff, E.T. 2004. Assessing the Impact of September 11th, 2001, on Children, Youth and Parents in the U.S.: Lessons from Applied Developmental Science Special Issue of Applied Developmental Science.Science, 8 (3), 8(4).
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Introduces the articles appearing in the July 2004 issue of "Applied Developmental Science" that focus on the impact of the September 2001 terror attacks on U.S. families. Trauma in children exposed to mass media days after the attack; Ability of parents to report the mental well-being of their traumatized children; Analysis of terrorism's impact on the mental health of individuals through symptomatology.

Aber, J.L., E. Gershoff, A. Ware & J. Kotler. 2004. Estimating the Effects of September 11th and Other Forms of Violence on the Mental Health and Social Development of New York City’s Youth: A Matter of Context Applied Developmental Science, Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 111-129.
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This longitudinal study examines the effects of exposure to the terrorist attack of September 11th as well as exposure to other forms of community violence on change in the mental health and social attitudes of youths in New York City. Three quarters of the youths reported some form of direct exposure to the events of September 11th, and 80% reported a lot of exposure to at least 1 form of media coverage of September 11th; these rates were comparable with the citywide survey of public school students in New York City conducted by the New York City Department of Education. Results of a structural equation model that included controls for previous levels of mental health and social attitudes, as well as a range of demographic factors, indicated that direct exposure and family exposure to the event did not predict change in any mental health outcomes, but did predict change in levels of social mistrust; media exposure did predict posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. In contrast, victimization by other forms of violence was strongly associated with change in or current levels of all of the examined mental health symptoms, whereas witnessing other forms of violence was associated with change in or levels of 3 of 4 mental health symptoms and with increased hostile attribution bias and levels of social mistrust. Implications of the results for applied developmental and public mental health strategies in response to traumatic events are discussed.

Aber, J.L., L. Berlin & J. Brooks-Gunn. 2004. Promoting Early Childhood Development through Comprehensive Community Initiatives Children's Services: Social Policy, Research, and Practice, 1(4), pp. 1-24.
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Recent advances in developmental psychology, social services, and social policy have converged to highlight 3 issues: (a) the importance of early development; (b) the importance of the contexts, or "ecology," of early development, especially with respect to the ill effects of early childhood poverty; and (c) the promise of intervention programs for low-income children, families, and communities, including comprehensive community initiatives (CCIs). CCIs, however, generally have not focused on young children. In this article, we synthesize developmental science and current understanding of CCIs to suggest a number of ways for CCIs to increase their emphasis on early development. We begin with a review of developmental research that illustrates the effects of community characteristics on children's development. We then review the goals, strategies, and principles of CCIs. These reviews illustrate that despite overlapping emphases, developmental science and CCIs could be linked more generatively. We propose ways in which CCIs can be geared more specifically toward promoting early child development. Finally, we suggest strategies for evaluating these types of initiatives.

Seidman, E., Aber, J.L. & French, S.E. 2004. The Organization of Schooling and Adolescent Development In K. Maton, C. Schellenbach, B. Leadbeater, & A. Solarz (Eds.), Investing in children, youth, families, and communities: Strengths-based research and policy (pp. 233-250). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association,
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Abstract

Investing in Children, Youth, Families, and Communities takes a theoretically exciting and socially critical view of human development and the power of context to shape positive outcomes. Co-editors Kenneth I. Maton, Cynthia J. Schellenbach, Bonnie J. Leadbeater, and Andrea L. Solarz bring together leading social scientists and policy experts to discuss what helps or hinders healthy development.

A transformative theme, from deficits to strengths, emerges in this book, as it surveys the mounting evidence that programs that shore up resilience can and do work. Empirically rich chapters show how children, youth, families, and communities can be vital resources in countering the challenges posed by violence, abuse, neglect, and other obstacles to development. It provides concrete examples of programs that recognize, strengthen, and marshal the abilities of individuals and groups traditionally assumed to be deficient or in need of "fixing."

Uniquely, this book also extends the scientific findings to real-world program and policy implications. Each chapter is co-authored by scholars and policy experts with complementary strengths, bringing together expertise in the psychosocial aspects of an issue and expertise in social policy.

 

Brown, J.L., Roderick, T., Lantieri, L. & Aber, J.L. 2004. The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: A School-Based Social and Emotional Learning Program In J.E. Zins, R.P. Weissberg, M.C. Wang, & H.J. Walberg (Eds.), Building academic success on social and emotional learning: What does the research say? (pp.151-169). New York, NY: Teachers College Press,
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Abstract

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP) is one of the oldest and largest school-based conflict resolution programs in the United States. Beginning in 1994, we planned and implemented a rigorous scientific evaluation of the RCCP, involving over 350 teachers and 11,000 children from 15 public elementary schools in New York City. In this chapter, we describe the RCCP, explain the rationale for and design of the study, summarize the major results related to the program's impact on children's trajectories of social and emotional learning (SEL) and academic achievement, and discuss the implications of these findings for research, practice, and policy.

2003

Aber, J.L., Brown, J.L., Gershoff, E.T., Jones, S.M. & Pedersen, S.F.A. 2003. Changing Children's Trajectories of Development: Two-Year Evidence for the Effectiveness of a School-Based Approach to Violence Prevention National Center for Children in Poverty, New York, NY.
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Abstract

Awareness of youth violence has increased in recent years, resulting in more interest in programs that can prevent violent and aggressive behavior. Although overall rates of violence among young people have declined since the mid-1990s, rates of some forms of youth aggression, violence, and crime remain high. National data reveal that, each year, about 15 percent of high school students are involved in a physical fight at school and 8 percent are threatened or injured with a weapon. 1 Urban youth are at particular risk for exposure to violence and victimization.

This report describes one of the largest and longest running school-based violence prevention programs in the country-the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP)-and discusses the results of a rigorous evaluation conducted by the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. The evaluation provides concrete evidence that early, school-based prevention initiatives such as the RCCP can work and should be included in communities' efforts to prevent violence among children and youth.

 

Gershoff, E.T., Aber, J.L. & Raver, C.C. 2003. Child Poverty in the U.S.: An Evidence-Based Conceptual Framework for Programs and Policies In R. M. Lerner, F. Jacobs, & D. Wertlieb (Eds.) Promoting positive child, adolescent, and family development: A handbook of program and policy innovations, (pp. 81-136). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications,
Abstract

Introduce the concrete reality of family finances when living on the line. Describe the great variation in "supports" for low-income families & their children within & across States.

Aber, J.L., Brown, L.J. & Jones, S.M.. 2003. Developmental Trajectories Toward Violence in Middle Childhood: Course, Demographic Differences, and Response to School-Based Intervention Developmental Psychology , 39(2), 324-348.
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Abstract

The present study addressed 3 questions concerning (a) the course of developmental trajectories toward violence over middle childhood, (b) whether and how the course of these trajectories differed by demographic subgroups of children, and (c) how responsive these trajectories were to a universal, school-based preventive intervention. Four waves of data on features of children's social-emotional development known to forecast aggression/violence were collected in the fall and spring over 2 years for a highly representative sample of 1st to 6th grade children from New York City public elementary schools (N = 11,160). Using hierarchical linear modeling techniques, synthetic growth curves were estimated for the entire sample and were conditioned on child demographic characteristics (gender, family economic resources, race/ethnicity) and amount of exposure to components of the preventive intervention. Three patterns of growth--positive linear, late acceleration, and gradual deceleration--characterized the children's trajectories, and these trajectories varied meaningfully by child demographic characteristics. Most important, children whose teachers taught a high number of lessons in the conflict resolution curriculum demonstrated positive changes in their social-emotional developmental trajectories and deflections from a path toward future aggression and violence.

Lennon, M.C., Applebaum, L.D. & Aber, J.L. 2003. Public Attitudes Toward Low-Income Children and Families: How Employment Barriers and Welfare/Work Status Affect Public Support for Government Assistance Communications Research Brief, National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University,
Abstract

This report examines how the public responds to specific characteristics of women who face economic struggles. Our subject’s characteristics are randomly varied to include her barriers to employment (such as physical disability, mental illness, living in an area with high unemployment, and trouble with reliable child care) and whether she works or receives welfare.

Appelbaum, L.D., Lennon M.C. & Aber, J.L. 2003. Public Attitudes Toward Low-Income Children and Families: How the Belief in a Just World Influences American’s Attitudes Toward Solutions to Poverty Communications Research Brief, National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University.
Abstract

This report examines the psychological concept of “Belief in a Just World” and how it influences public opinion about low-income mothers and their efforts to become economically self-sufficient. Understanding these attitudes helps organizations like NCCP generate support for policies that assist low-income families.

2002

Aber, J.L., Brooks-Gunn, J. & Gershoff, E.T. 2002. Social Exclusion of Children in the United States: Identifying Potential Indicators Beyond child poverty: The social exclusion of children. Edited by Kahn, A.J. and S.B. Kamerman. Columbia.
Abstract

Papers from a conference held May 3-4, 2001, Columbia University.

2001

Aber, J.L. & Ellwood, D.T. 2001. Thinking About Children in Time. The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Industrialised Countries. Edited by Bradbury, D. and S. Jenkins, J. Micklewright. Cambridge University Press.
Abstract

A child poverty rate of ten percent could mean that every tenth child is always poor, or that all children are in poverty for one month in every ten. Knowing where reality lies between these extremes is vital to understanding the problem facing many countries of poverty among the young. This unique study goes beyond the standard analysis of child poverty based on poverty rates at one point in time and documents how much movement into and out of poverty by children there actually is, covering a range of industrialised countries - the USA, UK, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Hungary and Russia. Five main topics are addressed: conceptual and measurement issues associated with a dynamic view of child poverty; cross-national comparisons of child poverty rates and trends; cross-national comparisons of children's movements into and out of poverty; country-specific studies of child poverty dynamics; and the policy implications of taking a dynamic perspective.

2000

Ben-Arieh, A., Kaufman, N.H., Andrews, A.B., George, R.M., Lee, B.J. & Aber, J.L. 2000. Measuring and Monitoring Children’s Well Being Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Press,
Abstract

Roberts, A., Seidman, E., Pedersen, S., Chesir-Teran, D., Allen, L., Aber, J.L., Duran, V. & Hsueh, J. 2000. Perceived Family and Peer Transactions and Self-Esteem Among Urban Early Adolescents Journal of Early Adolescence, 20(1), 68-92,
Abstract

This research extends previous work that identified groups of youth characterized by profiles of perceived family and peer transactions. Predictions derived from self-enhancement and self-consistency theories concerning how such transactions might relate to self-esteem in a diverse sample of early adolescents (N = 635) were investigated. Both theories indicate independent contributions of family and peer transactions to self-esteem. The theories differ, however, with regard to implications for how the two microsystems might interrelate in their linkages with self-esteem, with self-enhancement theory implying a moderational model and self-consistency theory a mediational model. As predicted, family and peer profiles each made independent contributions to the prediction of self-esteem. Consistent with self-consistency theory, the relations of family transactions to self-esteem were mediated in part by their associations with peer transactions, with particularly strong linkages evident between qualitatively similar profiles of family and peer experiences. Support for a moderational model, however, was not found.

French, S., Seidman, E., Allen, L. & Aber, J.L. 2000. Racial/Ethnic Identity, Congruence with the Social Context, and the Transition to High School Journal of Adolescent Research, 15(5), 587-602,
Abstract

The transition to high school may serve as a race/ethnicity consciousness-raising experience that stimulates the development of one's racial/ethnic identity depending on newcomers' racial/ethnic congruence with the student body and staff, as well as their perceived social transactions with the new school. The nature of this development was tested within samples of poor, urban, Black, White, and Latino students (n = 144). Racial/ethnic identity (group–esteem and exploration) and perceived transactions with school (academic hassles, participation, and social support) were assessed at the end of both the year prior to the transition and the transition year. The results suggested that changes over the transition to senior high school served as a race/ethnicity consciousness-raising experience for both Black and European American students but in dramatically different ways.

Aber, J.L., Jones, S.M. & Cohen, J. 2000. The Impact of Poverty on the Mental Health and Development of Very Young Children In C.H. Zeanah, Jr. (Ed.), Handbook of Infant Mental Health, second edition, (pp. 113-128). New York, NY: Guilford Press.
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Abstract

The basic facts are increasingly well-known. Young children (under 6 years of age) have the highest poverty rates of any age group in the United States (Shirk, Bennett, & Aber, 1999) and in most other major Western industrialized democracies (Rainwater & Smeeding, 1995). In addition, poverty experienced in early childhood, especially extreme poverty, is more detrimental to children's future development than poverty experienced later in life (Duncan, Brooks-Gunn, & Klebanov, 1994). And, although it is difficult to tease out the effects of family-level poverty compared to that of neighborhood-level poverty, when researchers do so, it appears that family-level poverty has the stronger influence on children's development, including their mental health (Aber, 1994; Brooks-Gunn, Duncan & Aber, 1997).

Sethi, A., Mischel, W., Aber, J.L., Shoda, Y. & Rodriguez, M.L. 2000. The Role of Strategic Attention Deployment in Development of Self-Regulation: Predicting Preschoolers' Delay of Gratification from Mother-Toddler Interactions. Developmental Psychology, 36(6), 767-777,
Abstract

Toddlers' use of effective attention deployment strategies to cope with separation from the mother and with maternal behavior predicted the use of effective delay-of-gratification strategies at age 5, even though the contexts, measures, and manifest behaviors were different. Toddlers who used distraction strategies during a brief separation from the mother were able, at age 5, to delay immediate gratification longer for more valued rewards. Toddlers who explored at a distance from a controlling mother when she tried to engage the child also delayed longer and used more effective delay strategies at age 5, compared with toddlers who did not distance themselves. Toddlers whose mothers were not controlling showed the opposite pattern: Those who did not distance themselves from the mother's bids had longer preschool delay times and more effective strategies. Strategic attention deployment was shown to be an enduring self-regulatory skill visible in early development across domains, measures, and over time.

Knitzer, J., Yoshikawa, H., Cauthen, N.K. & Aber, J.L. 2000. Welfare Reform, Family Support, and Child Development: Perspectives from Policy Analysis and Developmental Psychopathology Development & Psychopathology, 12(4), 619-632,
Abstract

This article explores the implications of recent welfare-related policy change for the well-being of children in low income families, and for research investigating child development processes and outcomes. It provides an overview of current welfare-related policies and explores the implications for developmental researchers. The article also synthesizes early findings from research, highlighting both overall impacts and the more nuanced evidence that while families are transitioning off welfare, only a small number are transitioning out of poverty, and a subgroup of families at risk are not faring well. It then examines, from a theoretical and methodological framework, what developmental psychopathology might bring to the study of welfare-related impacts on children in the context of this complex and changing policy landscape, and what welfare researchers might bring to the field of developmental psychopathology. The article concludes with broad recommendations for both research and policy.

1999

Shirk, M., Bennett, N. & Aber, J.L. 1999. Lives on the Line: American Families and the Struggle to Make Ends Meet Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
Abstract

Almost half of the nation's children live in officially defined poverty or near-poverty. Putting a human face on this and other statistics, the authors present a disturbing and provocative composite portrait of 10 families struggling to make ends meetAfour white, two Hispanic, three black and one Hawaiian/Samoan. Bennett and Aber, both directors of Columbia University's National Center for Children in Poverty, and freelance journalist Shirk (a veteran St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter), identify three factorsAteen parenthood, low educational achievement and temporary or low-wage workAthat they call "the 'Bermuda Triangle' of family poverty." Add the associated risks of domestic violence, poor child care and damage to early brain development from malnutrition, preventable birth complications, environmental toxins, etc., and readers will begin to see why poverty cuts across urban, suburban and rural areas. A few of the parents profiled here battle drug addiction; one gambles; several suffer from disabling depression; one single mother bravely raises a severely disabled five-year-old son afflicted with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy and a 234-pound, 12-year-old daughter. In almost all the profiled families, one or both parents work, contradicting the widespread stereotype of the poor as lazy or irresponsible. In a succinct closing chapter, the authors call for a combination of public- and private-sector measures to help prevent or reduce child poverty. The issues they raise should fuel election-year debate.

Slade, A., Belsky, J., Aber, J.L. & Phelps, J. 1999. Mother’s Representations of Their Toddlers: Links to Adult Attachment and Observed Mothering Developmental Psychology, 35(3), 611-619.
Abstract

Mothers (N = 125) and their firstborn sons were studied over an 11-month period to examine relations between mothers' representations of their relationships with their children (measured at 15 months by using the Parent Development Interview [PDI]), adult representations of attachment (measured at 12 months by using the Adult Attachment Interview [AAI]), and observed mothering (measured at 15 and 21 months). Results indicate (a) that mothers classified as autonomous on the AAI scored highest on the joy-pleasure/coherence dimension of the PDI and mothers classified as dismissing on the AAI scored highest on the anger dimension of the PDI and (b) that mothers scoring higher on the joy-pleasure/coherence dimension of the PDI engaged in less negative and more positive mothering.

Aber, J.L., Belsky, J., Slade, A. & Crnic, K. 1999. Stability and Change in Mothers' Representations of Their Relationship with Their Toddlers Developmental Psychology, 35(4), 1038-1047.
Abstract

This study examined several issues in the developmental dynamics of parents' representations of their relationship with their toddlers. The authors studied 125 mothers and their firstborn toddler sons over a 13-month period. Mothers took the Parent Development Interview twice, when children were 15 and 28 months of age. Home observations of parent-child interactions and maternal ratings of daily hassles were collected when children were 21 and 27 months of age. The 3 factors that characterized mothers' representations of their 15-month-old firstborn sons (Joy-Pleasure/Coherence, Anger, Guilt-Separation Distress) also fit the data very well for their 28-month-old sons. Although there were no changes in average levels of mothers' (a) joy, pleasure, and coherence and (b) guilt and separation distress from 15 to 28 months, there was a significant increase in mothers' levels of anger. Stability analyses suggested a dynamic relationship between mothers' representations of joy, pleasure, and coherence and of anger over the 13-month period. Finally, changes in mothers' representations were predictable by positive mothering (which led to increased joy, pleasure, and coherence) and by parenting daily hassles (which led to more anger).

Seidman, E., Chesir-Terna, D., Friedman, J.L., Yoshikawa, H., Allen, L.A., Roberts, A. & Aber, J.L. 1999. The Risk and Protective Function of Perceived Family and Peer Microsystems Among Urban Adolescents in Poverty American Journal of Community Psychology, 27, 211-237.
Abstract

Utilized a pattern-based approach to discover the different constellations of perceived social transactions separately for family and peer systems and explored the risk and protective functions of these microsystem profiles for both depression and antisocial behavior among a sample of ethnically and racially diverse urban adolescents living in poverty. Measures of perceived social support, involvement and hassles with family and peers, as well as perceived social acceptance and peers' values were entered into two sets of iterative cluster analyses to identify distinct profiles of family and peer transactions. From each of the perceived family and peer transactional analyses, six replicated profiles emerged. Several of the profiles were consistent with expectations from prior literature such as Enmeshing families and Rejecting peer networks, while others were novel and intriguing such as Entangling peers. Family profiles were consistent in their risk and protective associations for both depression and antisocial behavior, while the peer profiles varied in their effects for each developmental outcome. For example, the Rejecting peer profile placed adolescents at increased risk for depression but protected them from antisocial behavior. Implications for future research and preventive intervention are discussed.

Aber, J.L. 1999. Twenty-Something: Down and Out in the Other America? In A. Booth, A.C.
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Abstract

In recent years the factors influencing young people's transition to adulthood have become much more problematic. This edited collection of papers from Pennsylvania State University's fifth annual Family Symposium explores the main issues involved in this transition, such as the widening gap between rich and poor, downsizing, global competition, and technological change. These factors have made jobs scarce in many areas, especially inner cities, and have profoundly affected family formation, making cohabitation, delays in marriage and parenthood, and prolonged residence with parents, the life choices of many young adults. These and other issues are explored by scholars from a wide variety of disciplines, who focus on four main questions: alterations in the structure of opportunity, prior experiences in the family, prior experiences in the workplace, and career development and marriage formation

1998

Cicchetti, D. & Aber, J.L. (Eds.) 1998. Contextualism and Developmental Psychopathology Development and Psychopathology, 10(2), 137-141.
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Abstract

The field of developmental psychopathology has grown rapidly over the past several decades and research conducted within this framework has made substantial contributions to our understanding of human adaptation and maladaptation (Cicchetti & Cohen, 1995a, 1995b; Cicchetti & Richters, 1997; Cicchetti & Toth, 1998a). Influenced by the theoretical expositions of several prominent developmentalists, including Jay Belsky (1984), Uri Bronfenbrenner (1979), Robert Emde (1994), Donald Ford and Richard Lerner (1992), Michael Lewis (1997), Patricia Minuchin (1985), Arnold Sameroff (1983; Sameroff & Emde, 1989), Alan Sroufe (Sroufe, Egeland, & Kreutzer, 1990), and Esther Thelen and Linda Smith (1994), theorists have called attention to the importance of viewing the development of psychopathology within a continuously unfolding, dynamic, and ever changing context (see, for example, Belsky, 1993; Cicchetti & Aber, 1986; Cicchetti & Lynch, 1993; Cicchetti & Toth, 1998b; Coie & Jacobs, 1993; Jensen & Hoagwood, 1997; Richters & Cicchetti, 1993; Susman, 1993). Moreover, we now know that social contexts exert effects not only on psychological processes but also on biological structures and processes (Boyce, Frank, Jensen, Kessler, Nelson, Steinberg, et al., 1998; Cicchetti & Tucker, 1994; Eisenberg, 1995; Nelson & Bloom, 1997).

Despite advances that have occurred, the full incorporation of a contextual focus into empirical research, even among developmental psychopathologists who are very sensitive to the importance of understanding contextual influences on children and families, has proven to be a challenging enterprise (Richters, 1997). In order to thoroughly investigate the development of psychopathology in context, researchers must be more precise in how they conceptualize, operationalize, and analyze context (see, for example, Boyce et al., 1998).

 

Samples, F. & Aber, J.L. 1998. Evaluations of School-Based Violence Prevention Programs In D.S. Elliott, B.A. Hamburg, & R. Williams (Eds.), Violence in American Schools: A New Perspective, pp.217-252. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
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Abstract

As youth violence continues to rise in the United States, even when adult crime rates are falling, the search for effective youth violence prevention strategies becomes more urgent. Because of near-universal school attendance by American children (until some time in high school), schools are a common site for preventive interventions, including strategies to prevent youth violence. But despite the growing need for youth violence prevention and the logic and attractiveness of using schools as prevention sites, the literature on empirical evaluations of school-based violence prevention initiatives is scattered and thin. The primary purpose of this chapter is to begin to compile the scant existing systematic literature on violence prevention programs in schools. A second purpose is to provide a developmental and contextual framework within which to understand current school-based violence prevention efforts.

Finally, a third purpose of this chapter is to briefly raise two sets of issues based on the description and analysis of school-based youth violence prevention initiatives that, in our opinion, are critical to our nation's progress in preventing youth violence. They are: (1) how to begin to move from violence prevention programs to violence prevention policies, and (2) how to develop a prevention science for school violence adequate to the task of guiding prevention policy.

 

Aber, J.L., Jones, S.M., Brown, J.L., Chaudry, N. & Samples, F. 1998. Resolving Conflict Creatively: Evaluating the Developmental Effects of a School-Based Violence Prevention Program in Neighborhood and Classroom Context Development and Psychopathology, 10(2), 187-213.
Abstract

This study evaluated the short-term impact of a school-based violence prevention initiative on developmental processes thought to place children at risk for future aggression and violence and examined the influence of classroom and neighborhood contexts on the effectiveness of the violence prevention initiative. Two waves of developmental data (fall and spring) were analyzed from the 1st year of the evaluation of the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP), which includes 5053 children from grades two to six from 11 elementary schools in New York City. Three distinct profiles of exposure to the intervention were derived from Management Information System (MIS) data on between classroom differences in teacher Training and Coaching in RCCP, Classroom Instruction in RCCP, and percentages of students who are Peer Mediators. Developmental processes that place children at risk were found to increase over the course of the school year. Children whose teachers had a moderate amount of training and coaching from RCCP and who taught many lessons showed significantly slower growth in aggression-related processes, and less of a decrease in competence-related processes, compared to children whose teachers taught few or no lessons. Contrary to expectation, children whose teachers had a higher level of training and coaching in the RCCP but taught few lessons showed significantly faster growth over time in aggressive cognitions and behaviors. The impact of the intervention on children’s social cognitions (but not on their interpersonal behaviors) varied by context. Specifically the positive effect of High Lessons was dampened for children in high-risk classrooms and neighborhoods. Implications for future research on developmental psychopathology in context and for the design of preventive interventions are discussed.

Seidman, E., Yoshikawa, H., Roberts, A., Chesir, D., Aber, J.L., Allen, L. & Friedman, J.L. 1998. The Influence of Structural and Experiential Neighborhood Factors and Developmental Stage on the Antisocial Behavior of Urban Adolescents in Poverty Development and Psychopathology, 10, 259-282.
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Abstract

This study explored the effects of structural and experiential neighborhood factors and developmental stage on antisocial behavior, among a sample of poor urban adolescents in New York City. Conceptually and empirically distinct profiles of neighborhood experience were derived from the data, based on measures of perceived neighborhood cohesion, poverty-related hassles, and involvement in neighborhood organizations and activities. Both the profiles of neighborhood experience and a measure of census-tract-level neighborhood hazard (poverty and violence) showed relationships to antisocial behavior. Contrary to expectation, higher levels of antisocial behavior were reported among adolescents residing in moderate-structural-risk neighborhoods than those in high-structural-risk neighborhoods. This effect held only for teens in middle (not early) adolescence and was stronger for teens perceiving their neighborhoods as hassling than for those who did not. Implications for future research and preventive intervention are discussed.

Allen, L., Jones, S.M., Seidman, E. & Aber, J.L. 1998. The Organization of Exposure to Violence Among Urban Adolescents: Clinical, Prevention, and Research Implications In D.J. Flannery, & C.R. Huff (Eds.), Youth Violence: Prevention, Intervention, and Social Policy, (pp. 119-141). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.
Abstract

Providing the latest research on effective prevention and intervention strategies for reducing youth violence, Youth Violence: Prevention, Intervention, and Social Policy is a comprehensive resource for dealing with both perpetrators and victims of violence and understanding the risk factors facing youth.

Goodman, G., Aber, J.L., Berlin, L. & Brooks-Gunn, J. 1998. The Relations Between Maternal Behaviors and Urban Preschool Children's Internal Working Models of Attachment Security Infant Mental Health Journal, 19(4), 338-378.
Abstract

Interviewed 93 African-American, low-income women who had become pregnant as teenagers and their preschool-aged children in their homes. Mothers answered questions regarding their everyday stresses and feelings of depression. Children were assessed for receptive vocabulary ability, then video-taped completing five stories thematically related to attachment experiences with mother and rated on their security of attachment. Mothers and children were also videotaped playing together, and mothers were assessed on their sensitivity to their children's cues. After controlling for children's age and receptive vocabulary ability, mothers' sensitivity significantly predicted children's level of attachment security. The positive association between maternal sensitivity and children's security of attachment, and the strengths and weaknesses of administering the Attachment Story-Completion Task in the home with this population, are discussed. Implications for assessing attachment in the home are considered.

1997

Aber, J.L., Gephart, M., Brooks-Gunn, J. & Connell, J. 1997. Development in Context: Implications for Studying Neighborhood Effects In G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn & J.L. Aber (Eds.), Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, (pp. 44-61). New York: Russell Sage.
Abstract

Aber, J.L. & Jones, S.M. 1997. Indicators of Positive Development in Early Childhood: Improving Concepts and Measures In R. Hauser, B. Brown, W. Prosser & M. Stagner (Eds.), Indicators of Children's Well-Being, (pp. 395-427). New York: Russell Sage.
Abstract

Aber, J.L. 1997. Measuring Child Poverty for Use in Comparative Policy Analysis In A. Ben- Arieh & H. Wintersberger (Eds.), Monitoring and Measuring the State of Children: Beyond Survival, (pp. 193-208). Eurosocial Report, 62. Vienna: European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research
Abstract

Duncan, G. & Aber, J.L. 1997. Neighborhood Models and Measures In G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn & J.L. Aber (Eds.), Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, (pp. 44-61). New York: Russell Sage.
Abstract

Brooks-Gunn, J., Duncan, G. & Aber, J.L. (Eds.) 1997. Neighborhood Poverty I: Context and Consequences for Children New York: Russell Sage.
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Abstract

Drawing from national and city-based sources, Volume I reports the empirical evidence concerning the relationship between children and community. As the essays demonstrate, poverty entails a host of problems that affects the quality of educational, recreational, and child care services. Poor neighborhoods usually share other negative features--particularly racial segregation and a preponderance of single mother families--that may adversely affect children. Yet children are not equally susceptible to the pitfalls of deprived communities. Neighborhood has different effects depending on a child's age, race, and gender, while parenting techniques anda family's degree of community involvement also serve as mitigating factors.

Brooks-Gunn, J., Duncan, G. & Aber, J.L. (Eds.) 1997. Neighborhood Poverty II: Policy Implications for Studying Neighborhoods New York: Russell Sage.
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Abstract

Volume II incorporates empirical data on neighborhood poverty into discussions of policy and program development. The contributors point to promising community initiatives and suggest methods to strengthen neighborhood-based service programs for children. Several essays analyze the conceptual and methodological issues surrounding the measurement of neighborhood characteristics. These essays focus on the need to expand scientific insight into urban poverty by drawing on broader pools of ethnographic, epidemiological, and quantitative data. Volume II explores the possibilities for a richer and more well-rounded understanding of neighborhood and poverty issues.

Halpern-Felsher, B., Connell, J. Spencer, M., Aber, J.L., Duncan, G., Clifford, E., Crichlow, W., Usinger, P. & Cole, S. 1997. Neighborhood and Family Factors Predicting Educational Risk and Attainment in African-American and European-American Children and Adolescents In G. Duncan, J. Brooks-Gunn & J.L. Aber (Eds.), Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children, (pp. 146-173). New York: Russell Sage.
Abstract

Aber, J.L., Bennett, N.G., Li, J. & Conley, D.C. 1997. The Effects of Poverty on Child Health and Development Annual Review of Public Health, 18, 463-483.
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Abstract

Poverty has been shown to negatively influence child health and development along a number of dimensions. For example, poverty-net of a variety of potentially confounding factors-is associated with increased neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rates, greater risk of injuries resulting from accidents or physical abuse/neglect, higher risk for asthma, and lower developmental scores in a range of tests at multiple ages.

Despite the extensive literature available that addresses the relationship between poverty and child health and development, as yet there is no consensus on how poverty should be operationalized to reflect its dynamic nature. Perhaps more important is the lack of agreement on the set of controls that should be included in the modeling of this relationship in order to determine the "true" or net effect of poverty, independent of its cofactors. In this paper, we suggest a general model that should be adhered to when investigating the effects of poverty on children. We propose a standard set of controls and various measures of poverty that should be incorporated in any study, when possible.

1996

Allen, L., Denner, J., Yoshikawa, H., Seidman, E. & Aber, J.L. 1996. Acculturation and Depression Among Latina Urban Girls In B.J.R. Leadbeater & N. Way (Eds.), Urban Adolescent Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities (pp. 337-352). New York: New York University Press.
Abstract

Macksoud, M., Aber, J.L. & Cohn, I. 1996. Assessing the Impact of War On Children
Abstract

In R. Apfel, & B. Simon (Eds.), Minefields in Their Hearts: The Mental Health of Children in War and Communal Violence, (pp. 218-231). New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996.

Allen, L., Aber, J.L., Seidman, E., Denner, J. & Mitchell, C. 1996. Midlife Parenting in a Black and Latina Urban Sample: Effects of Adolescent Change Across a School Transition In C. Ryff, & M. Seltzer (Eds.), When Children Grow Up: Development and Diversity in Midlife Parenting, (pp. 301-335). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Abstract

Aber, J.L., Brown, J.L., Chaudry, N., Jones, S.M. & Samples, F. 1996. The Evaluation of the Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: An Overview American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Supplement to Volume 12(5), 82-90.
Abstract

Seidman, E., Aber, J.L., Allen, L. & French, S.E. 1996. The Impact of the Transition to High School on the Self-System and Perceived Social Context of Poor Urban Youth American Journal of Community Psychology, 24, 489-515.
Abstract

Macksoud, M. & Aber, J.L. 1996. The War Experiences and Psychosocial Development of Children in Lebanon Child Development, 67(1), 70-88.
Abstract

Knitzer, J. & Aber, J.L. 1996. What a Difference a State Makes: Tracking the Well-Being of Young Children and Families FOCUS, 18 (1), 49-51.
Abstract

1995

Seidman, E., Allen, L., Aber, J.L., Mitchell, C., Feinman, J., Yoshikawa, H…. & Roper, G.C. 1995. Development and Validation of Adolescent Perceived Microsystem Scales: Social Support, Daily Hassles and Involvement American Journal of Community Psychology, 23(3), 355-388.
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Connell, J.P., Aber, J.L. & Walker, G. 1995. How Do Urban Communities Affect Youth? Using Social Science Research to Inform the Design and Evaluation of Comprehensive Community Initiatives In J.P. Connell, A. Kubisch, L. Schorr, & C. Weiss (Eds.) New Approaches to Evaluating Comprehensive Community Initiatives: Concepts, Methods and Contexts, (pp. 93-125). Roundtable on Comprehensive Community Initiatives for Children and Families, The Aspen Institute.
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Aber, J.L., Brooks-Gunn, J. & Maynard, R. 1995. The Effects of Welfare Reform on Teenage Parents and Their Children Future of Children, 5(2), 53-71.
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Rogosch, F.A., Cicchetti, D. & Aber, J.L. 1995. The Role of Child Maltreatment in Early Deviations in Cognitive and Affective Processing Abilities and Later Peer Relationship Problems Development and Psychopathology, 7(4), 591-609.
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Knitzer, J. & Aber, J.L. 1995. Young Children in Poverty: Facing the Facts American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 65(2), 174-176.
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