NYU Rudin Center at TRB


If you’re heading to the annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board next week, don’t miss the NYU Rudin Center’s appearances:

- “Citi Bike Takes New York,” presented by Mitchell Moss (NYU Rudin Director), Lily Gordon-Koven and Nolan Levenson (NYU Rudin Research Assistants) in Session 672, “Striving to Build Consensus Across Transportation Modes,” Tuesday, January 14, 2014, 3:45pm- 5:30pm.

- “What’s the Worst That Can Happen? Developing Social Media Protocols and Policies,” written by Sarah Kaufman (NYU Rudin Digital Director) and Susan Bregman, presented by Susan Bregman in Session 559, “Using Social Media to Improve Urban Transportation,” Tuesday, January 14, 2014 10:15AM – 12:00PM.

This presentation is based on the book chapter by the same name written by Sarah Kaufman and Susan Bregman.

Hope to see you there!

USDOT Under Secretary Polly Trottenberg Visits the Rudin Center


by Nolan Levenson, photos by Marilyn Lopez

Polly Trottenberg, Under Secretary of the US Department of Transportation, visited with the NYU Rudin Center and Wagner students, faculty, transportation professionals, and representatives of the media last week to discuss timely issues in federal transportation policy. Her talk focused on financing transportation, the successes of the TIGER grant program, and the increasing role of technology and data in government.

She also addressed how the Sequester will impact USDOT. Since the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) composes about 75% of the USDOT’s budget, they will bear the burden of the spending cuts. Airports with less traffic may lose their funding. There will also likely be impacts to the Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) budget, but about half of USDOT will be unaffected.

Ms. Trottenberg also highlighted the increasing difficulty of financing transportation as the gas tax no longer covers the nation’s transportation infrastructure needs. She pointed to tools such as gas sales taxes and Vehicles Miles Traveled (VMT) taxes, and emphasized tolling of highways as a potential significant revenue source. She acknowledged that while federal transportation law prevents the tolling of existing road capacity, state law and legislators have also failed to initiate policies that would change this limitation, which creates a political block on a potential new revenue source for transportation. In general, she said, she believes that state transportation policy must be pushed in a more progressive direction.

Many in the room were happy to hear Ms. Trottenberg’s support for more open data and advanced technology use at the federal government. She said that USDOT should tap into the resources of the private sector to better understand and analyze transportation issues throughout the country. She pointed to a moment when her staff was on the phone with Google employees in Stuttgart, Germany, when the USDOT staff asked about the reliability of real-time traffic data. After a pause of a few seconds, the Google employees responded, “well it’s not like it’s more than 60 seconds off,” a response met with laughter by USDOT staff considering that to be, of course, extremely reliable. The story was also received with laughter during our discussion, and the audience appreciated the example for government’s need to tap into existing technological resources.

News at the Rudin Center


The NYU Rudin Center staff has been busy:

Rudin Center Director Mitchell Moss discussed the making of Hipsturbia and organic dry cleaners as indicators of gentrification in The New York Times.

Research Associate Sarah Kaufman will present the Rudin Center’s report on Superstorm Sandy at the Transportation Equity Conference in Albany on March 4th.

Research Assistant Carson Qing‘s study of Williamsburg’s late night rush hour has been featured in the Brooklyn Paper and The L Magazine. His newest post on location of employment in major U.S. is now on the blog.

We’re proud to bring on Anthony Townsend as Senior Research Fellow. Here’s a look at the work he’ll be doing at the Rudin Center:

Anthony Townsend is organizing several upcoming workshops that will further the Rudin Center’s investigations into emerging areas of transportation policy, planning and management – resilient regional transportation infrastructure for the Northeast Corridor, future tools and techniques for studying bicycle ownership and use in New York City, the role of big data and pedestrians, and future mobility systems in digitally-connected cities. Through his affiliation with the Silicon Valley-based Institute for the Future, Anthony is conducting a year-long forecast on the future of makers and small-scale manufacturing in cities around the world. His first book, SMART CITIES: Big Data, Civic Hackers and the Quest for a New Utopia will be published in October 2013 by W.W. Norton & Co.

 

Finally, some of our research staff attended the State of the City address at Barclays Center. Here’s a photo:

 

Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Facebook for regular updates.

NACTO Conference: Opening Plenary Recap


The National Association of City Transportation Officials was held October 24-26. This Opening Plenary summary was written by NYU Rudin Center Research Assistant Nolan Levenson, and delayed due to Hurricane Sandy.

“Janette Sadik-Khan has put Robert Moses in the back seat” – Mitchell Moss, Director of the Rudin Center for Transportation

Three heavy hitters in Transportation sat together on the morning of Wednesday, October 24th —Ray LaHood, USDOT secretary; Janette Sadik-Khan, NYCDOT Commissioner; and Mitchell Moss, Director of the Rudin Center for Transportation—to kick off the National Association of City Transportation Officials’ (NACTO) Designing Cities conference. Sadik-Khan noted that cities are in a “seminal moment” in history where, due to lack of federal support and attention, they are taking the future into their own hands to “speed the pace of innovation” in transportation.

Mitchell Moss emphasized this innovation trend in transportation. “People used to be interested in housing, but there hasn’t been an innovation in housing in 20 years,” said Moss, “all of the young and talented people are interested in transportation.” He touted Sadik-Khan’s transformation of New York City saying, “Janette Sadik-Khan has put Robert Moses in the back seat.”

New York City, through the leadership of Sadik-Khan with, among others, her staff at NYCDOT, MTA, and support from the Rudin Center, has launched a wide array of innovative solutions to transportation problems such as low-cost pedestrian plazas, bicycle infrastructure, and rapid (“select bus”) bus service. These ideas have both improved transportation efficiency, safety for users of all modes, and have boosted the local economy. After the installation of a new pedestrian plaza in DUMBO, Brooklyn, the adjacent retail sales increased 172% in 3 years, noted Sadik-Khan. These temporary plazas become part of the capital program, and will eventually be built out permanently with fixed infrastructure.

Ray LaHood commended Sadik-Khan for her work and the work of all other city transportation officials attending the conference. Despite a lack of federal financial support for transportation infrastructure funding, cities and USDOT have found ways to collaborate, primarily through TIGER stimulus money, to continue building and repairing the nation’s transportation infrastructure. LaHood noted the flaws of new federal transportation bill, MAP-21, stating, “the best part of MAP-21 is that it’s only 2 years.” He encouraged mayors and city residents alike to pressure their congressional representatives to fund necessary transportation improvements to bring our country into the 21st century.

In order to create world-class cities, LaHood is committed to restoring bi-partisanship to transportation issues in order to fund another round of TIGER grants, explore new funding possibilities such as real estate value capture in relation to transportation improvements, move the federal livability partnership forward (along with EPA and HUD), and incorporate safety and design initiatives such as NACTO bikeway guidelines into USDOT guidelines.

Even with LaHood’s federal support, the message was clear: cities themselves must be the innovators to find solutions to transportation needs. These solutions do not only provide transportation benefits, but can help stimulate the local economy in a challenging time.