Sean Cahill
Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Administration

Sean Cahill, Ph.D., is Director of Health Policy Research at the Fenway Institute in Boston. At Fenway Cahill focuses on LGBT health and HIV policy. Since 2010 he has served as an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Administration at New York University’s Robert Wagner School of Public Service. He is author of Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention: Moving toward implementation, published by the Fenway Institute in February 2012.

Cahill is the author of two books on LGBT family policy, and coauthor of LGBT youth in America’s schools, published in May 2012 by the University of Michigan Press. A leader in the LGBT and HIV movements for more than two decades, Cahill was Managing Director of Public Policy, Research and Community Health at Gay Men’s Health Crisis from 2007 to 2011, where he successfully advocated for a national HIV/AIDS strategy and for attention to gay and bisexual men through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. He directed the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute from 2001 to 2007, and served as its research director from 1999-2001. There he produced ground-breaking research, such as *Outing Age: Public policy issues affecting gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender elders* (2000) and *Black same-sex couples in the United States: A report from the 2000 Census*(2004). He is a member of the Massachusetts Commission on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth.

Semester Course
Spring 2014 PADM-GP.4444.001 LGBT Issues in Public Policy

The movement for equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people is one of the most successful in recent history. In the U.S., even though LGBT people and same-sex couple families experience inequality and exclusion in a wide range of state and federal policy arenas, significant policy advances have occurred. These include the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, the adoption of transgender nondiscrimination laws in 16 states, the extension of marriage equality in eight states, and support for same-sex marriage by President Obama and the Democratic Party. This course will examine the incredible successes of LGBT rights activism in the U.S. and globally, and the treatment of LGBT people in several policy areas, with an in-depth focus on several issue areas that afford a broad overview of domestic and global LGBT policy, including: implementation of the Affordable Care Act; elder issues; youth and education policy; family recognition and the policy implications of race and gender differences among same-sex couple households; and international LGBT rights struggles. We will also examine debates within the U.S. LGBT movement between progressives/liberals and conservatives, and look at voting behavior and public opinion trends.


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Fall 2012 UPADM-GP.228.001 LGBT Issues in Public Policy

LGBT people experience inequality and exclusion in a wide range of state and federal policy arenas. However, public policies and attitudes are changing, as we saw recently with the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, the extension of marriage equality in New York and Maryland, and President Obama’s stated support for same-sex marriage. This course examines the history of urban LGBT communities in the U.S. since the 1920s, and the pro- and anti-gay political forces that emerged in the late 1940s; the current debate over marriage, parenting, and family recognition; demographics of LGBT community, including race and gender differences among same-sex couples, and the particular experiences of LGBT people of color; the major policy issues affecting LGBT people, including elder, youth and health policy; how LGBT policy controversies play out in U.S. electoral politics and public opinion; and the status of LGBT people and homosexually active people around the world and in global policy and funding bodies.


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Fall 2011 UPADM-GP.0228.001 LGBT Issues in Public Policy

LGBT people experience inequality and exclusion in a wide range of state and federal policy arenas. However, public policies and attitudes are changing, as we saw recently with the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, the extension of marriage equality in New York and Maryland, and President Obama’s stated support for same-sex marriage. This course examines the history of urban LGBT communities in the U.S. since the 1920s, and the pro- and anti-gay political forces that emerged in the late 1940s; the current debate over marriage, parenting, and family recognition; demographics of LGBT community, including race and gender differences among same-sex couples, and the particular experiences of LGBT people of color; the major policy issues affecting LGBT people, including elder, youth and health policy; how LGBT policy controversies play out in U.S. electoral politics and public opinion; and the status of LGBT people and homosexually active people around the world and in global policy and funding bodies.


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Fall 2010 UPADM-GP.0228.001 LGBT Issues in Public Policy

LGBT people experience inequality and exclusion in a wide range of state and federal policy arenas. However, public policies and attitudes are changing, as we saw recently with the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, the extension of marriage equality in New York and Maryland, and President Obama’s stated support for same-sex marriage. This course examines the history of urban LGBT communities in the U.S. since the 1920s, and the pro- and anti-gay political forces that emerged in the late 1940s; the current debate over marriage, parenting, and family recognition; demographics of LGBT community, including race and gender differences among same-sex couples, and the particular experiences of LGBT people of color; the major policy issues affecting LGBT people, including elder, youth and health policy; how LGBT policy controversies play out in U.S. electoral politics and public opinion; and the status of LGBT people and homosexually active people around the world and in global policy and funding bodies.


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Date Publication/Paper
2012

Cianciotto, Jason and Sean Cahill 2012. LGBT Youth in America’s Schools University of Michigan Press
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Abstract

In LGBT Youth in America’s Schools, Jason Cianciotto
and Sean Cahill, experts on lesbian, gay, bisexual,
and transgender public policy advocacy, combine an
accessible review of social science research with analyses
of school practices and local, state, and federal
laws that affect LGBT students. In addition, portraits
of LGBT youth and their experiences with discrimination
at school bring human faces to the issues the
authors discuss.

This is an essential guide for teachers, school administrators,
guidance counselors, and social workers interacting
with students on a daily basis; school board
members and officials determining school policy;
nonprofit advocates and providers of social services
to youth; and academic scholars, graduate students,
and researchers training the next generation of
school administrators and informing future policy and
practice.

Cahill, Sean 2012. Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention: Moving toward implementation Fenway Institute
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Abstract

Initial results from clinical prevention trials of pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) indicate that PrEP could be a key part of the
“game changer” needed to more effectively fight HIV. PrEP entails that
at risk HIV-uninfected people take antiretroviral medications to prevent
HIV transmission through unprotected sex or sharing needles. Oral PrEP
uses antiretroviral medications that are currently available for treatment.
A related experimental technology involves topical microbicides, a term
that can refer to any anti-infective agent, but in the current usage refers
to topical gels that contain anti-retroviral medications that are applied
vaginally or rectally to prevent HIV transmission. Future approaches to
the use of antiretrovirals for prevention include the use of intravaginal
rings or injectable medication. Some oral PrEP and topical microbicide trials have shown promise, while others have not. The use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention has shown efficacy with men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexuals. Biomedical
prevention interventions such as PrEP have great potential, especially if coupled with expanded testing, diagnosis, and linkage to earlier initiation of treatment and care (TLC ). Modeling demonstrates the most effective deployment of PrEP to slow the spread of HIV will be in combination with scaled-up treatment. PrEP must be accompanied by sustained care and behavioral interventions to ensure adherence, minimize risk compensation (people increasing risk because of anticipated protection), and monitor side effects and drug toxicities. Because many people who are at greatest risk to acquire HIV do not access regular clinical care, alternative implementation arrangements will be necessary. National monitoring systems are critical to preventing the spread of drug-resistant HIV. Some have raised concerns about PrEP related to potential side effects, risk compensation (the idea that people will stop using condoms if PrEP becomes available), drug resistance, and cost. However, reviews of five major clinical trials involving about 6,000 participants by the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research shows no greater risk of side effects, no risk compensation, and no clinically significant development of drug resistance in participants.

In the Press

05/09/2012
A Potential Game Changer in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS
Huffington Post