Each Tuesday, Conflict, Security, and Development Series will examine new research, discuss creative policy approaches and highlight recent innovations in responding to the challenges of security and development in conflict and post-conflict situations. This series is co-presented by the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at NYU Law School, the Center for Global Affairs at NYU’s School for Continuing and Professional Studies, NYU's Global Institute for Public Health, and the Office of International Programs at NYU Wagner.

Please select the session(s) for which you would like to RSVP.
Tuesday, Sep. 9, 2014, 12:30pm-1:30pm
Update on Rwanda: 20 Years After the Genocide
Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl.
295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604  map


Tuesday, Sep. 16, 2014, 12:30pm-1:30pm
The Place of Human Rights in a Renewed Global Push to End Extreme Poverty
Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl.
295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604  map


Tuesday, Sep. 23, 2014, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Crisis on the Southern Border: Unaccompanied Children Flee to the United States.  Refugees or Illegal Immigrants? Humanitarian or Political Crisis?

From October 2013 through June 2014, more than 56,000 unaccompanied children, primarily from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, have crossed from Mexico into the US – two times as many who crossed last year, and four times as many who crossed just a few years ago.  Discuss the origins of this crisis, the latest developments, the humanitarian response, and examine the political implications.  Compare the US response with responses by other countries faced with population influxes. 

Speaker:
John Keys, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Center for Global Affairs; former Senior Vice President, Programs, International Rescue Committee

Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl.
295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604  map


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Tuesday, Sep. 30, 2014, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Brazil’s Transitional Justice Policies: Perspectives from a Federal Prosecutor

Brazil's 1988 constitution enshrines a unique mandate for the Brazilian Public Prosecution Service-to defend human rights and the rule of law-in addition to fulfilling its criminal prosecution duties. As a federal prosecutor for nearly 20 years, Marlon Weichert specialized in human rights litigation and advocacy. Weichert will discuss his firsthand experience with the Federal Prosecution Service, developing transitional justice strategies in response to Brazil's repressive dictatorship. He will explain recent initiatives, including innovations and challenges, in the fields of justice, truth, memory and reparations.

Speaker:
Marlon Weichert, CHRGJ Hauser Global Scholar

Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl.
295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604  map


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Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Drug Policy Reform: How Did We Get Here and What is Next?

The ‘war on drugs’, in most places, is metaphorical. It is rarely used by governments and was recently abandoned as a rhetorical device by the United States. As more public figures call for drug policy reform, two inevitable questions come to mind (a) how did we get to where we are today? and as reform comes about (b) what are the policy trends that different countries are following around the world?
 
This talk will address most common misconceptions and concerns around drug policy reform and cannabis legal regulation. It will also present with key questions as reform moves forward around the world.
 
Speaker:
Aram Barra - Co-founder and Programme Director, Espola; Program Officer of the Joint Drug Policy Reform Project of Mexico United Against Crime and Transform Drug Policy Foundation

Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl.
295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604  map


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Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Democratic Regression in Southeast Asia and its Implications
 
Since the late 2000s, Southeast Asia's democratization has stalled and, in some of the region's most economically and strategically important nations, gone into reverse. The region's rollback from democracy reflects a worrying global retrenchment toward anti-democratic political change, with significant implications for freedom, health, and prosperity locally and consequences for U.S. interests around the world.

Speaker:
Josh Kurlantzick, Senior Fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations

Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl.
295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604  map


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