Over the last twenty years, social supports for single women mothers have declined significantly. The passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 coupled with continued cuts in funding for federal programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to low-income families, has made it nearly impossible for single women mothers to become economically secure or to build wealth.

Today, single women mothers possess only 4 percent of the wealth of single fathers and Black and Latino single mothers have a median wealth of zero.

Join us for the release of At Rope’s End: Single Women Mothers, Wealth and Asset Accumulation in the U.S. and a moderated conversation between Mariko Chang, PhD author of the newly released book Short Changed: Why Women have Less Wealth and What Can Be Done About It and Ida Rademacher, PhD Director of Research for the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED) in Washington D.C.

This event is part of the Opportunity Series of the Women of Color Policy Network at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. To learn more about the series and to download the full report, visit wagner.nyu.edu/wocpn.