Cities

Determinants of School Performance in New York Elementary Schools: Results and Implications for Resource Use

Determinants of School Performance in New York Elementary Schools: Results and Implications for Resource Use
Condition Report for the New York State Education Finance Research Consortium. May

Iatarola, P., Schwartz, A.E. & Stiefel, L.
05/01/2001

This study seeks to identify and better understand factors that determine differences in performance/efficiency between various schools. It also examines through statistical analysis strengths and weaknesses of the production-function based approach to assessing school performance in New York City schools. The authors conclude that there is no statistical way to select a school performance/efficiency measure because results can vary significantly depending on how performance is defined. They contend this leads to important implications regarding the ability to accurately rank schools.

Institutional Decision-Making

Institutional Decision-Making
Chapter 9 and Appendix 10 in Climate Change and a Global City: The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. Metro East Coast, edited by C. Rosenzweig and W. D. Solecki. New York, NY: Columbia Earth Institute and Goddard Institute.

Zimmerman, R. & Cusker, M..
04/01/2001

The international scientific community has begun to focus upon the reality of global climate change and sophisticated research techniques provide increasingly accurate models of the potential impacts of associated weather extremes, disease outbreaks, and global and local environmental destruction. Yet decision-making institutions have not, for the most part, incorporated global climate change in their policies and planning efforts. This report presents the implications of climate change, thus far considered largely in a global context, in very local terms. As research and discussion of climate change begin to focus on anticipated regional impacts, decision-makers in the Metropolitan East Coast (MEC) Region and elsewhere should begin to consider and implement practical adaptation policies affecting land use, infrastructure, natural resource management, public health, and emergency and disaster response.

Women of Color in New York City: The Challenges of the New Global Economy

Women of Color in New York City: The Challenges of the New Global Economy
First Annual  Status of Women of Color Report.

Stafford, W.W.
03/01/2001

The first Status of Women of Color Report originated out of the need to provide data and research focusing on women of color. By drawing attention to the trends seen in income, unemployment, welfare, and incarceration for women of color in New York city , this report summarizes their achievements and lack of it during the 1990's.

Changing Water and Sewer Finance: Distributional Impacts and Effects on the Viability of Affordable Housing

Changing Water and Sewer Finance: Distributional Impacts and Effects on the Viability of Affordable Housing
Journal of the American Planning Association, 67(4): 420-37.

Schill, M., Netzer, D. & Susin, S.
01/01/2001

In this article, we focus on the distributional impact of a shift to charging for water and sewer service based entirely on actual water use measured by meters. In particular, we examined what the impact of universal metering in New York City would be on low- and moderate- income housing. We found that, despite its possible positive effects on conservation, universal water metering would have a substantial and regressive impact on both the providers and consumers of the city's low-income housing.

Performance Management in New York City: COMPSTAT and the Revolution in Police Management

Performance Management in New York City: COMPSTAT and the Revolution in Police Management
in Quicker, Better, Cheaper? Managing Performance in American Government, ed. Dall Forsythe. Albany: Suny Press,

Bratton, W. & Smith, D.C.
01/01/2001

Scholars may argue about the effectiveness of the "reinvention movement" at the state and federal level. At the local level, the managers of urban police forces have in fact reinvented American police administration, and in doing so have contributed to dramatic reductions in crime all across the nation. The story of this reinvention is complex, but central to it is a radical shift in the way police organizations strategically use information about performance to achieve greater managerial accountability. Because these new performance management techniques were pioneered in New York City in the mid-1990s, the development and implementation of Compstat by the New York City Police Department (NYPD) is a valuable case study of this new approach to policing.

Race, Class and Social Control in the Streets

Race, Class and Social Control in the Streets
Sociological Forum. 2001, Vol. 16(4), pp. 759-772.

Conley, D. & Ryvicker, M.
01/01/2001

Jane Jacobs has recently become the most popular, pop sociologist around. There has been a spiked resurgence of media interest in her 1961 urban studies classic, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. This may be due partly to the recent release of her new book, The Nature of Economies. But there is probably something more to it. For journalists, Jacobs' account of the neighborhood life of New York City's Greenwich Village of the 1950s seems to induce nostalgic longings for a greater sense of community. The bustling, narrow streets Jacobs describes were filled with both small shops and tenement residences, with hoards of pedestrians engaged in both business and sociability, and with strangers and lifelong inhabitants alike. This apparent chaos was actually a ballet of multitudes and Jacobs uncovered the latent order that undergirded the community.

Tax and the City

Tax and the City
in Re-thinking the Urban Agenda, John Mollenkopf and Ken Emerson, eds., Century Foundation, pp. 63-74.

Schwartz, A.E.
01/01/2001

The culmination of a year-long lecture series cosponsored by The Century Foundation and the City University of New York Graduate Center's Center for Urban Research, 'Rethinking the Urban Agenda' takes up the challenge provided by a changing of the guard in New York City government-the election of a new mayor and city council-to outline a new conceptual and political road map for New York City's future and, in many important respects, for the future of urban America.

The New York Urban League Survey: Black New York-On Edge, but Optimistic

The New York Urban League Survey: Black New York-On Edge, but Optimistic
State of Black America (National Urban League).

Stafford, W.W.
01/01/2001

In the waning decades of the 20 century, New York City was transformed from a magnet for U.S.- and Caribbean-born blacks to the center of the Diaspora of people of African descent. From Ethiopia to Panama, from Ghana to Brazil, immigrants of African descent streamed into the city's neighborhoods, enriching black culture with their languages and religions, and extending the range of black political interests.

Pages

Subscribe to Cities