Criminal Justice

Which 'Broken Windows' Matter? School, Neighborhood, and Family Characteristics Associated with Youth's Feelings of Unsafety

Which 'Broken Windows' Matter? School, Neighborhood, and Family Characteristics Associated with Youth's Feelings of Unsafety
Journal of Urban Health, Volume 80, Number 3, pages 400-415.

Mijanovich, T. & Weitzman, B.C.
01/01/2003

Young people’s fears of victimization and feelings of unsafety constitute a serious and pervasive public health problem and appear to be associated with different factors than actual victimization. Our analysis of a population-based telephone survey of youths aged 10–18 years in five economically distressed cities and their suburbs reveals that a substantial minority of youths feel unsafe on any given day, and that an even greater number feel unsafe in school. While some traditional predictors of victimization (such as low socioeconomic status) were associated with feeling unsafe, perceived school disorder was the major factor associated with such feelings. Disorderliness may thus be the school’s version of “broken windows,” which serve to signal to students a lack of consistent adult concern and oversight that can leave them feeling unsafe. We suggest that fixing the broken windows of school disorderliness may have a significant, positive impact on adolescents’ feelings of safety.

Performance Management in New York City: COMPSTAT and the Revolution in Police Management

Performance Management in New York City: COMPSTAT and the Revolution in Police Management
in Quicker, Better, Cheaper? Managing Performance in American Government, ed. Dall Forsythe. Albany: Suny Press,

Bratton, W. & Smith, D.C.
01/01/2001

Scholars may argue about the effectiveness of the "reinvention movement" at the state and federal level. At the local level, the managers of urban police forces have in fact reinvented American police administration, and in doing so have contributed to dramatic reductions in crime all across the nation. The story of this reinvention is complex, but central to it is a radical shift in the way police organizations strategically use information about performance to achieve greater managerial accountability. Because these new performance management techniques were pioneered in New York City in the mid-1990s, the development and implementation of Compstat by the New York City Police Department (NYPD) is a valuable case study of this new approach to policing.

Race-Based Neighborhood Projection: A Proposed Framework for Understanding New Data on Racial Integration

Race-Based Neighborhood Projection: A Proposed Framework for Understanding New Data on Racial Integration
Urban Studies 37(9), Aug 2000, pp. 1513-1533.

Ellen, I.G.
08/01/2000

This paper outlines the race-based, neighbourhood projection hypothesis which holds that, in choosing neighbourhoods, households care less about present racial composition than they do about expectations about future neighbourhood conditions, such as school quality, property values and crime. Race remains relevant, however, since households tend to associate a growing minority presence with structural decline. Using a unique data-set that links households to their neighbourhoods, this paper estimates both exit and entry models and then constructs a simple simulation model that predicts the course of racial change in different communities. Doing so, the paper concludes that the empirical evidence is more consistent with the race-based projection hypothesis than with other common explanations for neighbourhood racial transition.

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