Economics

Above Board: Raising the Standards for Passenger Service Workers at the Nation's Busiest Airports

Above Board: Raising the Standards for Passenger Service Workers at the Nation's Busiest Airports

Mason, C. Nicole & Garcia, Lisette
02/01/2012

I n the fall of 2011, the Women of Color Policy Network at New York University's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service conducted a survey of over 300 passenger service workers at the region's three major airports: LaGuardia, Kennedy International and Newark Liberty International.
Only workers contracted by the airlines were surveyed. This report focuses on the impact of the low-bid
contracting system on passenger service workers at the airports. It also proposes ways forward and concrete recommendations to raise job quality and performance standards for companies contracted directly with airlines.

The economic burden placed on healthcare systems by childhood obesity

The economic burden placed on healthcare systems by childhood obesity
Expert Rev Pharmacoecon Outcomes Res. 2012 Feb;12(1):39-45.

Trasande L and Brian Elbel.
02/01/2012

The obesity epidemic has transformed children's healthcare, such that diabetes, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome are phrases more commonly used by child health providers than ever before. This article reviews the economic consequences of this epidemic for healthcare delivery systems, both in the short term when obesity has been associated with increased utilization, and in the long term where increased likelihood of adult obesity and cardiovascular disease is well documented. Large investments through research and prevention are needed and are likely to provide strong returns in cost savings, and would optimally emerge through a cooperative effort between private and government payers alike. 

An Alternative Approach to Addressing Selection into and out of Social Settings: Neighborhood Change and African American Children’s Economic Outcomes

An Alternative Approach to Addressing Selection into and out of Social Settings: Neighborhood Change and African American Children’s Economic Outcomes
Sociological Methods & Research

Sharkey, Patrick.
01/01/2012

Higher Fees Paid to US Physicians Drive Higher Spending for Physician Services Compared to Other Countries

Higher Fees Paid to US Physicians Drive Higher Spending for Physician Services Compared to Other Countries
Health Affairs, 2011. Volume 30 / Issue 09 / September 2011, pp 1647-1656, Published online

Sherry Glied and Miriam Laugesen
09/08/2011

Higher health care prices in the United States are a key reason that the nation’s health spending is so much higher than that of other countries. Our study compared physicians’ fees paid by public and private payers for primary care office visits and hip replacements in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. We also compared physicians’ incomes net of practice expenses, differences in financing the cost of medical education, and the relative contribution of payments per physician and of physician supply in the countries’ national spending on physician services. Public and private payers paid somewhat higher fees to US primary care physicians for office visits (27 percent more for public, 70 percent more for private) and much higher fees to orthopedic physicians for hip replacements (70 percent more for public, 120 percent more for private) than public and private payers paid these physicians’ counterparts in other countries. US primary care and orthopedic physicians also earned higher incomes ($186,582 and $442,450, respectively) than their foreign counterparts. We conclude that the higher fees, rather than factors such as higher practice costs, volume of services, or tuition expenses, were the main drivers of higher US spending, particularly in orthopedics.

First to Fall, Last to Climb: Black Workers in the New Economy

First to Fall, Last to Climb: Black Workers in the New Economy

Women of Color Policy Network
08/01/2011

After decades of slow, but steady economic progress, the Great Recession of 2007-2009 erased many of the previous gains made by Blacks in the labor market. Black unemployment rates have consistently climbed since the recession was declared officially over in 2009, peaking at 16.5 percent in 2010. Employed Black workers, in turn, are disproportionately represented in low-wage, low-skill industries and occupations that offer minimal benefits or opportunities for career advancement. This policy brief provides a snapshot of how Black workers are faring in the labor market and poses policy recommendations for building the long-term economic security of Black workers, their families, and communities.

Does Regulatory Supervision Curtail Microfinance Profitability and Outreach?

Does Regulatory Supervision Curtail Microfinance Profitability and Outreach?
World Development 39(6): 949-965, June 2011

Cull, Robert; Asli Demirgüç-Kunt; and Jonathan Morduch
06/01/2011

We combine two datasets to examine whether the scale of an economy’s banking system affects the profitability and outreach of microfinance institutions. We find evidence that competition matters. Greater bank penetration in the overall economy is associated with microbanks pushing toward poorer markets, as reflected in smaller average loans sizes and greater outreach to women. The evidence is particularly strong for microbanks that rely on commercial-funding, use traditional bilateral lending contracts (rather than group lending methods favored by microfinance NGOs), and take deposits. We consider plausible alternative explanations for the correlations, including relationships that run through the nature of the regulatory environment and the structure of the banking environment, but we fail to find strong support for these alternative hypotheses.

State Legislative Roundup for 2011

State Legislative Roundup for 2011

Women of Color Policy Network
06/01/2011

As state sessions draw to a close, this brief examines legislative activity in the first half of 2011 in three main areas—economic security, immigration reform, and reproductive rights—and highlights what state-level legislative wins and losses mean for women of color and their families. Clear trends emerge in this summary: an unprecedented number of attacks on workers, immigrant rights, and women’s reproductive health represent challenges ahead for women of color. At the same time, many setbacks were accompanied with signs of promise, including notable rejections of anti-immigrant measures and legal challenges to legislation restricting women’s access to reproductive health services.

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