Governance

A Deficit Model of Collaborative Governance: Government-Nonprofit Fiscal Relations in the Provision of Child Welfare Services

A Deficit Model of Collaborative Governance: Government-Nonprofit Fiscal Relations in the Provision of Child Welfare Services
Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, 25(4): 1031-1058.

Nicole Marwell and Thad Calabrese
12/01/2015

Much existing scholarship on nonprofit organizations’ receipt of government funds appears to assume that there is something highly problematic about this relationship. Although rarely articulated in these studies, the concern about the negative effects of government funding turns on a view of nonprofits that privileges their private character. In this paper, rather than examining how public funds constrain private action, we inquire about how government deploys private organizations, via the mechanism of government funding, to secure a public good.  Using a case study of the nonprofit child welfare sector in New York State, we theorize a deficit model of collaborative governance in which nonprofits have been deputized by the state to secure children’s social rights but do not receive sufficient resources to cover the costs of securing those rights. Then, we connect this theory to organization-level financial management practices that pose challenges to the nonprofits of both survival and service quality. This nonprofit organizational instability concerns the state insofar as it threatens the securing of individuals’ social rights.

Vision + Action = Faithful Execution: Why Government Daydreams and How to Stop the Cascade of Breakdowns That Now Haunts It

Vision + Action = Faithful Execution: Why Government Daydreams and How to Stop the Cascade of Breakdowns That Now Haunts It
Light, P. C. (2016). Vision + Action = Faithful Execution: Why Government Daydreams and How to Stop the Cascade of Breakdowns That Now Haunts It. PS-POLITICAL SCIENCE & POLITICS, 49(1), 5-20. Chicago

Light, Paul
12/01/2015

Understanding leadership in a world of shared problems: Advancing network governance in large landscape conservation

Understanding leadership in a world of shared problems: Advancing network governance in large landscape conservation
2016. Special issue on "Network Governance in Large Landscape Conservation" in Frontiers in Ecology and Environment.

Imperial, M., S. Ospina, E. Johnson, R. O'Leary, P. Williams, S. Johnson, & J. Thomeson
10/26/2015

Conservation of large landscapes requires three interconnected types of leadership: collaborative leadership, in which network members share leadership functions at different points in time; distributive leadership, in which network processes provide local opportunities for members to act proactively for the benefit of the network; and architectural leadership, in which the structure of the network is intentionally designed to allow network processes to occur. In network governance, each leadership approach is necessary to achieve sustained, successful outcomes. We discuss each of these approaches to leadership and offer specific practices for leaders of networks, including: shaping the network's identity and vision, attracting members, instilling leadership skills in members, and advancing common interests. These practices are then illustrated in case studies.

To Give Is to Get: The Promotional Role of Investment Bankers in Local Bond Elections.

To Give Is to Get: The Promotional Role of Investment Bankers in Local Bond Elections.
The American Review of Public Administration 45(5): 503-524

Todd Ely and Thad Calabrese
09/01/2015

Public managers and elected officials are generally restricted from supporting election campaigns with public resources. In the case of legislative referenda, the public stakeholders responsible for putting a policy question on the ballot must play a neutral role when acting in their official capacity. A system where private money supports public goals has emerged as regulatory provisions simultaneously restrict direct private giving to elected officials and public support for election campaigns. Using campaign finance disclosures, election results, and municipal bond issuance data, we find that post-election fees paid to firms making political contributions are significantly higher than for non-contributors. The finding improves the understanding of how private dollars support public policy outcomes, raises questions about the circumvention of laws restricting the use of public resources in election campaigns, and informs ongoing consideration of the need for additional regulatory action and disclosure requirements to address issue committee campaign contributions. 

Obamacare, five years after the law (French)

Obamacare, five years after the law (French)
Les Tribunes de la santé; (47): 81-89.

Rodwin, VG.
07/24/2015

Obamacare is the most important reform in the American healthcare system since 1965. Its introduction provoked unprecedented controversy between republicans and democrats. Whilst much remains to be done, it has already helped extend health insurance coverage, change the way the healthcare system is funded, establish federal regulations for private insurance, and above all, promote innovation and experiments to modernize the healthcare delivery. Seen from France, it is interesting to follow the array of ongoing experiments in the United States intended to modernize the healthcare system: adaptations to the payment systems for hospitals and doctors and organizational innovations to improve healthcare delivery.

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