Health Policy

Behavior Changes After Notification of HIV Infection

Behavior Changes After Notification of HIV Infection
American Journal of Public Health, Dec 1991, Vol. 81 Issue 12, p1586-1586, 5p.

Cleary, P.D., Van Devanter, N., Rogers, T.F., Singer, E., Shipton-Levy, R., Steilen, M., Stuart, A., Avorn, J. & Pindyck, J.
12/01/1991

To learn more about how people who did not volunteer for testing react to information about HIV infection, we assessed short-term behavior changes in HIV-positive blood donors. Methods. Blood donors who were notified at the New York Blood Center that they were HTV positive were asked to participate in a study. A nurse elicited a medical history, performed a limited medical examination, and asked participants to complete a questionnaire that included questions about drug use, sexual behavior, and psychological characteristics. Participants were asked to return in 2 weeks to complete another questionnaire. Results. Many fewer men and women reported engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors in the 2 weeks preceding the follow-up visit than had reported such behaviors prior to notification. These changes were greater than those other investigators have reported, but about 40% of the participants still reported unsafe sexual activity at the follow-up interview. Conclusions. To make nonvolunteer screening programs for HIV infection more effective in reducing the spread of HTV infection, we need to learn more about how to help people change their high-risk behaviors.

Le Controle des Pouvoirs Publics et des Payeurs: Comparaisons Internationales

Le Controle des Pouvoirs Publics et des Payeurs: Comparaisons Internationales
Rodwin, V. G. (1987). Le Contrôle des Pouvoirs Publics et des Payeurs: Comparaisons Internationales. In M. Berthod-Wurmser & V. G. Rodwin (Eds.), Système de santé, pouvoirs publics et financeurs: Qui contrôle quoi? (pp. 55-68). France: Documentation Française.

Rodwin, V.G.
07/25/1987

Pneumoconiosis and Exposure of Dental Laboratory Technicians

Pneumoconiosis and Exposure of Dental Laboratory Technicians
American Journal of Public Health, Nov 1984, Vol. 74 Issue 11, p1252-1257, 6p

Rom, W.N. & Lockey, J.E., Lee, J.S., Kimball, C., Ki Moon, B., Leaman, H., …& Gibbons, H.L.
01/01/1984

One hundred and seventy-eight denial laboratory technicians and 69 non-exposed controls participated in an epidemiological respiratory study. Eight technicians who had a mean of 28 years' grinding nonprecious metal alloys were diagnosed as having a simple pneumoconiosis by chest radiograph. Mean value for per cent predicted FVC and FEV[sub 1] were reduced among male nonsmoker technicians compared to male nonsmoker controls: after controlling for age. there was also a reduction in spirometry with increasing work years. An industrial hygiene survey was conducted in 13 laboratories randomly selected from 42 laboratories stratified by size and type of operation in the Sah Lake City, Utah metropolitan area. Personal exposures to beryllium and cobalt exceeded the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) in one laboratory. Occupational exposures ia dental laboratories need to be controlled to prevent beryllium-related lung disorders as well as simple pneumoconiosis.

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