Leadership

Learning Pathways Grid

Learning Pathways Grid
In Coghlan, D. & Brydon-Miller, M. (eds.) Encyclopedia of Action Research. Sage Publications.

Rivard, P., Foldy, E. G., & Rudolph, J. W.
05/31/2016

The Learning Pathways Grid (LPG) is a visual template (see Figure 1) for a particular kind of conversation analysis. LPG analysis helps professionals discover links from cognition to action, to the effects of action and makes those links explicit; it then supports a pragmatic redesign of action. LPG analysis is a powerful action research tool. It allows professionals to develop reflective practice skills in a rigorous, structured and collaborative way. While ‘reflective practice’ may appear mysterious and unattainable, the LPG allows practitioners at any level to identify ways in which their espoused beliefs and actual actions conflict or are in sync, a key reflective practice skill.

Permeable borders: How understanding conflict in research teams can enhance understanding conflict in work teams

Permeable borders: How understanding conflict in research teams can enhance understanding conflict in work teams
2016. In Dejun, Tony Kong & Donald R. Forsyth (eds.) Leading Through Organizational Conflict: Into the Fray. Palgrave-MacMillan.

Foldy, E. G. & Buckley, T. R.
05/31/2016

Notes for the Implementation of Strategic Human Talent in Colombia within a Model of Deliberative Public Administration

Notes for the Implementation of Strategic Human Talent in Colombia within a Model of Deliberative Public Administration
In Pedro Pablo Sanabria Pulido (ed.) From Recommendation to Action: How to Start a Model of Strategic Management of Human Talent in the Colombian Public Sector. Bogota: Ediciones UniAndes (in Spanish).

S. Ospina
05/31/2016

Creating value for participants in multi-stakeholder alliances: the shifting importance of leadership and collaborative decision-making over time

Creating value for participants in multi-stakeholder alliances: the shifting importance of leadership and collaborative decision-making over time
December 2015. Health Care Management Review.

D'Aunno, T., Alexander, J.A., & Jiang, L.
05/26/2016

BACKGROUND:

Multistakeholder alliances that bring together diverse organizations to work on health-related issues are playing an increasingly prominent role in the U.S. health care system. Prior research shows that collaborative decision-making and effective leadership are related to members' perceptions of value for their participation in alliances. Yet, we know little about how collaborative decision-making and leadership might matter over time in multistakeholder alliances.

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was to advance understanding of the role of collaborative decision-making and leadership in individuals' assessments of the benefits and costs of their participation in multistakeholder alliances over time.

METHODS:

We draw on data collected from three rounds of surveys of alliance members (2007-2012) who participated in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality program.

FINDINGS:

Results from regression analyses indicate that individuals' perceptions of value for their participation in alliances shift over time: Perceived value is higher with collaborative decision-making when alliances are first formed and higher with more effective leadership as time passes after alliance formation.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Leaders of multistakeholder alliances may need to vary their behavior over time, shifting their emphasis from inclusive decision-making to task achievement.

Civil Society Capacity for Public Action: Lessons for Leadership Development in Social Change Organizations. (Capacidad de la Sociedad Civil para la Acción Pública Local: Lecciones sobre el desarrollo de Liderazgos en Organizaciones para el Cambio Social)

Civil Society Capacity for Public Action: Lessons for Leadership Development in Social Change Organizations. (Capacidad de la Sociedad Civil para la Acción Pública Local: Lecciones sobre el desarrollo de Liderazgos en Organizaciones para el Cambio Social)
Ospina Bozzi, S. 2015. In CLAD (ed) 20 Años de Congresos del CLAD: Aportes a la Reforma del Estado y la Administración Pública en Iberoamérica. 2015. Caracas: CLAD/AECID. Pp. 155-168. (In Spanish)

Ospina Bozzi, S.
02/04/2016

Nonprofits as “Schools of Democracy”: A Comparative Case Study of Two Environmental Organizations

Nonprofits as “Schools of Democracy”: A Comparative Case Study of Two Environmental Organizations
2016. Published online before print May 4, 2015, doi: 10.1177/0899764015584063. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, June 2016 45(3): 478-499.

Dodge, J. and S. M. Ospina
10/26/2015

This article presents a comparative case study of two nonprofit organizations that do community organizing in the environmental field and asks how do nonprofits school citizens in democracy? Although the literature suggests the importance of social capital, a practice approach surfaces important political dimensions that have not been sufficiently explored. We find that distinct organizational practices create contexts for participants to exercise specific ways of being and doing—called “subject positions”—vis-à-vis the state and their political community. These practices support member participation by serving to construct “citizens”—rather than customers or clients—who develop skills in critical thinking and who exercise agency in the organization and the policy field they seek to influence. These practices represent key mechanisms for schooling citizens in democracy in these nonprofit organizations and link participation in the organization with broader political participation. We discuss implications for theory and practice.

Understanding leadership in a world of shared problems: Advancing network governance in large landscape conservation

Understanding leadership in a world of shared problems: Advancing network governance in large landscape conservation
2016. Special issue on "Network Governance in Large Landscape Conservation" in Frontiers in Ecology and Environment.

Imperial, M., S. Ospina, E. Johnson, R. O'Leary, P. Williams, S. Johnson, & J. Thomeson
10/26/2015

Conservation of large landscapes requires three interconnected types of leadership: collaborative leadership, in which network members share leadership functions at different points in time; distributive leadership, in which network processes provide local opportunities for members to act proactively for the benefit of the network; and architectural leadership, in which the structure of the network is intentionally designed to allow network processes to occur. In network governance, each leadership approach is necessary to achieve sustained, successful outcomes. We discuss each of these approaches to leadership and offer specific practices for leaders of networks, including: shaping the network's identity and vision, attracting members, instilling leadership skills in members, and advancing common interests. These practices are then illustrated in case studies.

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