Urban Planning

Lessons Learned from 22 Years of Testing the Quality Cost Model of Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) Transitional Care

Lessons Learned from 22 Years of Testing the Quality Cost Model of Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) Transitional Care
Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Vol. 34, No. 4, pp. 369-75.

Brooten, D., Naylor, M., Finkler, S., et al.
01/01/2002

To describe the development, testing, modification, and results of the Quality Cost Model of Advanced Practice Nurses (APNs) Transitional Care on patient outcomes and health care costs in the United States over 22 years, and to delineate what has been learned for nursing education, practice, and further research. ORGANIZING CONSTRUCT: The Quality Cost Model of APN Transitional Care. METHODS: Review of published results of seven randomized clinical trials with very low birth-weight (VLBW) infants; women with unplanned cesarean births, high risk pregnancies, and hysterectomy surgery; elders with cardiac medical and surgical diagnoses and common diagnostic related groups (DRGs); and women with high risk pregnancies in which half of physician prenatal care was substituted with APN care. Ongoing work with the model is linking the process of APN care with the outcomes and costs of care. FINDINGS: APN intervention has consistently resulted in improved patient outcomes and reduced health care costs across groups. Groups with APN providers were rehospitalized for less time at less cost, reflecting early detection and intervention. Optimal number and timing of postdischarge home visits and telephone contacts by the APNs and patterns of rehospitalizations and acute care visits varied by group. CONCLUSIONS: To keep people well over time, APNs must have depth of knowledge and excellent clinical and interpersonal skills that are the hallmark of specialist practice, an in-depth understanding of systems and how to work within them, and sufficient patient contact to effect positive outcomes at low cost.

Lower Manhattan and the Region: Where We are and Where We Must Go

Lower Manhattan and the Region: Where We are and Where We Must Go
New York Transportation Journal, Fall 2002, Vol. 6, No. 1.

Sander, E.G.
01/01/2002

Immediately after 9/11, New York Governor George E. Pataki's senior staff asked the Rudin Center, in concert with the Regional Plan Association (RPA) and the Empire State
Transportation Alliance (ESTA),* to develop a conceptual plan for the renewal of Lower Manhattan. President George W. Bush's second visit to Lower Manhattan was scheduled for three weeks after 9/11 and the Governor wanted a preliminary plan to discuss with the President at that time.

Revitalizing Inner-City Neighborhoods: New York City's Ten Year Plan for Housing

Revitalizing Inner-City Neighborhoods: New York City's Ten Year Plan for Housing
Housing Policy Debate 13(3),

Ellen, I.G., Schill, M.H., Schwartz, A.E. & Voicu, I.
01/01/2002

This article examines the impact of New York City's Ten-Year Plan on the sale prices of homes in surrounding neighborhoods. Beginning in the mid-1980s, New York City invested $5.1 billion in constructing or rehabilitating over 180,000 units of housing in many of the city's most distressed neighborhoods. One of the main purposes was to spur neighborhood revitalization.

In this article, we describe the origins of the Ten-Year Plan, as well as the various programs the city used to implement it, and estimate whether housing built or rehabilitated under the Ten-Year Plan affected the prices of nearby homes. The prices of homes within 500 feet of Ten-Year Plan units rose relative to those located beyond 500 feet, but still within the same census tract. These findings are consistent with the proposition that well-planned project based housing programs can generate positive spillover effects and contribute to efforts to revitalize inner-city neighborhoods.

 

Setting an Agenda for Local Action: The Limits of Expert Opinion and Community Voice

Setting an Agenda for Local Action: The Limits of Expert Opinion and Community Voice
Policy Studies Journal (2002 - Vol. 30, No. 3), pp. 362-278.

Silver, D., Weitzman, B.C. & Brecher, C.
01/01/2002

Many social programs, funded by government or philanthropy, begin with efforts to improve local conditions with strategic planning. Mandated by funders, these processes aim to include the views of community residents and those with technical expertise. Program leaders are left to reconcile public and expert opinions in determining how to shape their programs. The experience of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Urban Health Initiative suggests that although consultation with experts and the public failed to reveal a clear assessment of the community's problems or their solutions, it did assist in engaging diverse groups. Despite this engagement, however, core leaders wielded substantial power in selecting the agenda.

Social Implications of Infrastructure Network Interactions

Social Implications of Infrastructure Network Interactions
Journal of Urban Technology, Vol. 8, No. 3 (December 2001), pp. 97-119. Also published in Flux Cahiers scientifiques internationaux Reseaux et Territoires (International Scientific Quarterly on Networks and Territories), Number 47, Janvier-Mars

Zimmerman, R.
01/01/2002

Urbanized and soon-to-be urbanizing areas are increasingly dependent upon infrastructure transmission and distribution networks for the provision of essential public resources and services for transportation, energy, communications, water supply, and wastewater collection and treatment. In large part, the increasing spread of population settlements at the periphery of cities and the increasing density and vertical integration of urban cores have increased reliance upon the connectivity that these networks provide. These infrastructure networks are, in turn, dependent upon one another, both functionally and spatially, in very complex ways, and that interdependence is increased as new capacity-enhancing infrastructure technologies are developed. The extent of these dependencies appears to be escalating, and that results in interactions among the systems and produces effects upon environments that are difficult to predict.

National Dialogue on Transportation Operations Association Partners Dialogue

National Dialogue on Transportation Operations Association Partners Dialogue
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, July

Kupferman, S.
07/01/2001

This white paper reflects the views of the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) regarding operations and management issues. It is intended to assist the U.S. Department of Transportation in furthering the National Dialogue on Transportation Operations (National Dialogue) at its 2002 fall Summit, and in formulating operations and management policy initiatives for the next reauthorization of federal transportation programs. This project was conducted for the Institute of Transportation Engineers and the Federal Highway Administration with the cooperation and support of the National Association of City Transportation Officials.

Institutional Decision-Making

Institutional Decision-Making
Chapter 9 and Appendix 10 in Climate Change and a Global City: The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. Metro East Coast, edited by C. Rosenzweig and W. D. Solecki. New York, NY: Columbia Earth Institute and Goddard Institute.

Zimmerman, R. & Cusker, M..
04/01/2001

The international scientific community has begun to focus upon the reality of global climate change and sophisticated research techniques provide increasingly accurate models of the potential impacts of associated weather extremes, disease outbreaks, and global and local environmental destruction. Yet decision-making institutions have not, for the most part, incorporated global climate change in their policies and planning efforts. This report presents the implications of climate change, thus far considered largely in a global context, in very local terms. As research and discussion of climate change begin to focus on anticipated regional impacts, decision-makers in the Metropolitan East Coast (MEC) Region and elsewhere should begin to consider and implement practical adaptation policies affecting land use, infrastructure, natural resource management, public health, and emergency and disaster response.

Changing Water and Sewer Finance: Distributional Impacts and Effects on the Viability of Affordable Housing

Changing Water and Sewer Finance: Distributional Impacts and Effects on the Viability of Affordable Housing
Journal of the American Planning Association, 67(4): 420-37.

Schill, M., Netzer, D. & Susin, S.
01/01/2001

In this article, we focus on the distributional impact of a shift to charging for water and sewer service based entirely on actual water use measured by meters. In particular, we examined what the impact of universal metering in New York City would be on low- and moderate- income housing. We found that, despite its possible positive effects on conservation, universal water metering would have a substantial and regressive impact on both the providers and consumers of the city's low-income housing.

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