Urban Planning

Assessment of the Transfer Penalty for Transit Trips: A GIS-based Disaggregate Modeling Approach

Assessment of the Transfer Penalty for Transit Trips: A GIS-based Disaggregate Modeling Approach
Transportation Research Record, Vol.1872, pp.10-18

Guo, Z. & Wilson, N.H.M.
01/01/2004

Transit riders negatively perceive transfers because of their inconvenience, often referred to as a transfer penalty. Understanding what affects the transfer penalty can have significant implications for a transit authority and also lead to potential improvements in ridership forecasting models. A new method was developed to assess the transfer penalty on the basis of onboard survey data, a partial path choice model, and geographic information system techniques. This approach was applied to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)subway system in downtown Boston. The new method improves the estimates of the transfer penalty, reduces the complexity of data processing, and improves the overall understanding of the perception of transfers.

Evaluation Study of the Port Authority of NY & NJ's Value Pricing Initiative

Evaluation Study of the Port Authority of NY & NJ's Value Pricing Initiative
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, January

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
01/01/2004

Part of a larger project assessing the efficacy of value pricing and changes in the toll schedule on Port Authority facilities, this report documents the decision-making process leading up to and immediately following the implementation of value pricing so as to derive lessons learned that could be utilized when implementing similar programs elsewhere.

How Telecommunications is Shaping Urban Spaces

How Telecommunications is Shaping Urban Spaces
J. Wheeler et. al., eds. Fractionated Geographies: Cities in the Telecommunications Age

Moss, M. & Townsend, A.
01/01/2004

All too often, telecommunications systems are treated as an alternative to transportation systems, as a substitute for the physical movement of people and services. The growing use of telecommunications systems is doing far more than influence where people work and live, but is actually changing the character of activities that occur in the home, workplace, and automobile. This chapter examines the way in which information and telecommunications are transforming everyday urban life; making the home into an extension of the office, shopping mall, and classroom; allowing the automobile and airplane to become workplaces; and converting the office building into a hub for social interaction and interpersonal contact. The diffusion of information technologies drastically increases the complexity of cities by increasing the number and type of interactions among individuals, firms, technical systems and the external environment. Information systems are permitting new combinations of people, equipment, and places; as a result, there is a dramatic change in the spatial organization of activities within cities and large metropolitan regions.

Sustaining Urban Networks: The Social Diffusion of Large Technical Systems

Sustaining Urban Networks: The Social Diffusion of Large Technical Systems
London, UK: Routledge,

Coutard, O., R. Hanley & Zimmerman, R., eds.
01/01/2004

Telecommunications, transportation, energy and water supply networks have gained crucial importance in the functioning of modern social systems over the past 100 to 150 years. Sustaining Urban Networks studies the development of these networks and the economic, social and environmental issues associated with it.

Taking sustainability in its triple economic, environmental and social dimensions, contributors such as Bernard Barraque and Olivier Coutard take stock of previous research on large technical systems and discuss sustainability from three main perspectives: uses, cities, rules/institutions.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Spring/Summer 2004, Vol. 7, No. 2.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Editor.
01/01/2004

This issue considers the diverse ways that transportation can engage with its context, from its place in Downtown Brooklyn and central cities to engineering for the pedestrian environment or ADA compliance.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Fall 2004, Vol. 8, No. 1.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Editor.
01/01/2004

The Journal's editor, together with publisher Elliot Sander, the Editorial Board, and our volunteer authors, put together an issue that discusses the state transportation and MTA financing issues, a discussion of value pricing efforts at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the use of green design in transit projects and history and current vision for the Bronx's Grand Concourse.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Fall 2004, Vol. 8, No. 1.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Editor.
01/01/2004

This issue discusses the state transportation and MTA financing issues, value pricing efforts at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the use of green design in transit projects and the history and current vision for the Bronx's Grand Concourse.

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: A School-Based Social and Emotional Learning Program

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: A School-Based Social and Emotional Learning Program
In J.E. Zins, R.P. Weissberg, M.C. Wang, & H.J. Walberg (Eds.), Building academic success on social and emotional learning: What does the research say? (pp.151-169). New York, NY: Teachers College Press,

Brown, J.L., Roderick, T., Lantieri, L. & Aber, J.L.
01/01/2004

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP) is one of the oldest and largest school-based conflict resolution programs in the United States. Beginning in 1994, we planned and implemented a rigorous scientific evaluation of the RCCP, involving over 350 teachers and 11,000 children from 15 public elementary schools in New York City. In this chapter, we describe the RCCP, explain the rationale for and design of the study, summarize the major results related to the program's impact on children's trajectories of social and emotional learning (SEL) and academic achievement, and discuss the implications of these findings for research, practice, and policy.

The Role of Cities in Providing Housing Assistance: A New York Perspective

The Role of Cities in Providing Housing Assistance: A New York Perspective
In Amy Ellen Schwartz, ed., City Taxes, City Spending: Essays in Honor of Dick Netzer. Northampton, Mass: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.,

Ellen, I.G., Schill, M.H., Schwartz, A.E. & Voicu, I.
01/01/2004

In a festschrift to Netzer-a public finance economist well known for his research on state and local taxation, urban public services, and nonprofit organizations-eight chapters apply microeconomics to problems facing urban areas and use statistical analysis to gain insight into practical solutions. The essays look at alternative methods of financing urban government, such as a land value tax and the impact of sales and income taxes on property taxation; at government expenditures, including housing subsidies; and at subsidies to nonprofit arts groups as well as the role of the nonprofit sector in providing K-12 education. Of interest to the fields of public finance, urban economics, and public administration.

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