Urban Planning

Danger Ahead! How to Balance the MTA’s Budget

Danger Ahead! How to Balance the MTA’s Budget
Citizens Budget Commission, June

Brecher, C.
06/01/2006

Despite its essential role in sustaining the New York economy, the MTA is not financed in a consistent or sensible
manner. Specifically, the financing arrangements for the MTA result in:
Problem 1: Repeated operating deficits.
Problem 2: Capital investments insufficient to bring its facilities to a state of good repair.

In order for New York to maintain a strong and vibrant economy, its transportation system has to be kept up to par and expanded to meet future needs. This report examines the two problems and suggests alternative financing policies for the MTA that would balance its operating budget and provide sufficient capital to accelerate the pace at which its facilities are brought to a state of good repair.

The next section describes the vital role of the MTA in transporting people to their jobs in New York's central business district. The following sections explain the MTA's problems identified above, present the CBC's guidelines for funding the MTA services in the future, and estimate the agency's expenditure and revenue requirements under those guidelines. The final section deals with options for meeting revenue requirements by increasing cross subsides from auto users.

Growing Older in World Cities: New York, Paris, London and Tokyo

Growing Older in World Cities: New York, Paris, London and Tokyo
Edited with Michael Gusmano. Nashville Tn: Vanderbuilt University Press,

Rodwin, V.G.
02/01/2006

Population aging often provokes fears of impending social security deficits, uncontrollable medical expenditures, and transformations in living arrangements, but public policy could also stimulate social innovations. These issues are typically studied at the national level; yet they must be resolved where most people live—in diverse neighborhoods in cities. New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo are the four largest cities among the wealthiest, most developed nations of the world. The essays commissioned for this volume compare what it is like to grow older in these cities with respect to health care, quality of life, housing, and long-term care. The contributors look beyond aggregate national data to highlight the importance of how local authorities implement policies.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Winter 2006, Vol. 9, No. 2.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Sterman, B.P., (eds).
02/01/2006

This issue contains an interview with Urban Designer and Architect Jan Gehl by Janette Sadik-Khan, Senior Vice President of Parson Brinckerhoff and President of Company 39. Also included is an article focusing on developing Nassau County, as well as a piece highlighting current Rudin Center research on "Pedestrian and Bicyclist Standards and Innovations in Large Central Cities."

New York City: IN THE 21st CENTURY

New York City: IN THE 21st CENTURY
Economic Development Journal, Spring 2006, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p7-16, 10p.

Moss, M. L.
01/01/2006

The article reflects on the role of New York City in the 21st century which includes bringing people together with other people to generate the information and products that are then sold around the world. It also presents a brief history of the city in becoming a leading city in the global economy. It also discusses the economic and technological innovations the city had undertaken to become a leading city and the reforms it is planning to implement to maintain its status.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Spring 2005, Vol. 8, No. 2.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Sterman, B.P., (eds).
04/01/2005

This issue includes testimony given by NYU Wagner Rudin Center Director, Elliot G. Sander at a joint hearing of the New York State Senate Finance and Assembly Ways and Means Committees. Also included is an interview with Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) on Federal funding, as well as an article focusing on Staten Island's unique transportation issues.

Choices at a Critical Junction: New York's Mobility and Highway Infrastructure Needs for 2005-2010

Choices at a Critical Junction: New York's Mobility and Highway Infrastructure Needs for 2005-2010
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, March

Schaller, B.
03/01/2005

The report is an analysis of the $17.4 billion capital budget currently proposed for the New York State Department of Transportation for the next five years, and in particular the $5.9 billion proposed for the downstate area. In its review of bridge and roadway trends, the study finds that the improvements in roadways and bridges achieved during the 1990's have begun to erode over the last few years, and the capital budget, as it is currently proposed, would fail to reverse the erosion. The report was written by Bruce Schaller, a Visiting Scholar at NYU Wagner's Rudin Center, who has experience in highway, transit and taxi issues in New York and nationally. Schaller has authored reports on East River bridge tolls, suburban transit access to Lower Manhattan, commuting and the growth of non-work travel in New York City, MTA fare policy and bus rapid transit and numerous other topics.

Mass Transit Infrastructure and Urban Health

Mass Transit Infrastructure and Urban Health
Mass Transit Infrastructure and Urban Health, Journal of Urban Health, Vol. 82 (1) 2005, pp. 21-32.

Zimmerman, R.
03/01/2005

Mass transit is a critical infrastructure of urban environments worldwide. The public uses it extensively, with roughly 9 billion mass transit trips occurring annually in the United States alone according to the U.S. Department of Transportation data. Its benefits per traveler include lower emissions of air pollutants and energy usage and high speeds and safety records relative to many other common modes of transportation that contribute to human health and safety. However, mass transit is vulnerable to intrusions that compromise its use and the realization of the important benefits it brings. These intrusions pertain to physical conditions, security, external environmental conditions, and equity. The state of the physical condition of transit facilities overall has been summarized in the low ratings the American Society of Civil Engineers gives to mass transit, and the large dollar estimates to maintain existing conditions as well as to bring on new improvements, which are, however, many times lower than investments estimated for roadways. Security has become a growing issue, and numerous incidents point to the potential for threats to security in the US. External environmental conditions, such as unexpected inundations of water and electric power outages also make transit vulnerable. Equity issues pose constraints on the use of transit by those who cannot access it. Transit has shown a remarkable ability to rebound after crises, most notably after the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center, due to a combination of design and operational features of the system. These experiences provide important lessons that must be captured to provide proactive approaches to managing and reducing the consequences of external factors that impinge negatively on transit.

Financial Management for Public, Health, and Not-for-Profit Organizations

Financial Management for Public, Health, and Not-for-Profit Organizations
2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 672 pages.

Finkler, S.A.
01/01/2005

This is one of the only books available that addresses financial and managerial accounting within the framework of the three major areas of the public sector. Clear and comprehensive, Finkler's unique and accessible text provides the fundamentals of financial management for those who lack a financial background so that readers can access and apply financial information more effectively. Details the many aspects of strategic and budgetary planning. Outlines the processes involved in implementing and controlling results. Features aspects of accounting unique for Health Care, not-for-profit organizations and state and local governments. Explains balance sheets, operating and cash flow statements. Provides basic foundation for financial analysis. For managers and policy-makers in public service organizations who want to make more efficient use of their organization's financial information.

Leadership Development for Global Health

Leadership Development for Global Health
in Global Health Leadership and Management, Forege, WH; Daulaire, N.; Black, R.E.; Pearson, C.E., Eds. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco,

Boufford, J.I.
01/01/2005

Written by an international panel of distinguished global health experts, this book distills valuable lessons from a wide variety of successful health programs that have been implemented around the world. "Global Health Leadership and Management gives practical suggestions for enhancing and developing the essential skills of leadership, management, communication, and project planning for health care leaders. The book will assist health leaders to work well within their communities and effectively plan, direct, implement, and evaluate effective programs and activities. "Global Health Leadership and Management outlines and describes such core competencies as Identifying challenges and developing and managing policy Developing strategies, pathways, and solutions Creating networks and partnerships and planning for change Learning from experience to build a generation of leaders Leading and managing teams by recognizing and celebrating success

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