Urban Planning

Context Sensitive Solutions in Large Central Cities

Context Sensitive Solutions in Large Central Cities
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, February

de Cerreño, A.L.C. & Pierson, I.
02/01/2004

This report is a summary of the proceedings and findings from a one-and-a-half day peer-to-peer workshop on context sensitive design/solutions (CSD/S) held in New York City in June 2003. The goal of the session was to lay a foundation for dealing with the state of the practice and processes related to context sensitive solutions, and to identify specific urban examples that could be used as benchmarks for lessons learned and best practices. The report presents hard -to-find examples of CSD/S in large central cities, specifically from Boston, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, New York City, and Philadelphia. Each example illustrates some elements of CSD.S more than others, but together they provide a baseline for understanding how large cities are coping with the myriad issues related to CSD/S and why a more concerted effort is needed in understanding and implementing CSD/S.

Assessment of the Transfer Penalty for Transit Trips: A GIS-based Disaggregate Modeling Approach

Assessment of the Transfer Penalty for Transit Trips: A GIS-based Disaggregate Modeling Approach
Transportation Research Record, Vol.1872, pp.10-18

Guo, Z. & Wilson, N.H.M.
01/01/2004

Transit riders negatively perceive transfers because of their inconvenience, often referred to as a transfer penalty. Understanding what affects the transfer penalty can have significant implications for a transit authority and also lead to potential improvements in ridership forecasting models. A new method was developed to assess the transfer penalty on the basis of onboard survey data, a partial path choice model, and geographic information system techniques. This approach was applied to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)subway system in downtown Boston. The new method improves the estimates of the transfer penalty, reduces the complexity of data processing, and improves the overall understanding of the perception of transfers.

Dept. of Building, Winning the West

Dept. of Building, Winning the West
The New Yorker, July 5,

Whitagker, C. & Finnegan, W.
01/01/2004

Both sides have started punching harder lately in the brawl over whether or not to build a seventy-five-thousand-seat football stadium over the Hudson rail yards on Manhattan’s far West Side. The New York Jets, who would own the place, will be taking computers from the mouths of needy schoolchildren if the state and the city are forced to provide the six hundred million dollars that would be their part of the deal—or, at least, that’s what the television ads paid for by the Dolan family, the owners of Madison Square Garden, say. Nonsense, say the Jets and their supporters, who include Mayor Bloomberg, Governor Pataki, and the construction unions. The stadium will be such a financial success that it will end up giving computers to needy schoolchildren. Opponents say that the stadium will sink New York City’s bid to host the 2012 Olympics (the International Olympic Committee does not like controversy). No, say the stadium’s backers, it is the centerpiece of the city’s Olympic hopes.

Evaluation Study of the Port Authority of NY & NJ's Value Pricing Initiative

Evaluation Study of the Port Authority of NY & NJ's Value Pricing Initiative
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, January

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
01/01/2004

Part of a larger project assessing the efficacy of value pricing and changes in the toll schedule on Port Authority facilities, this report documents the decision-making process leading up to and immediately following the implementation of value pricing so as to derive lessons learned that could be utilized when implementing similar programs elsewhere.

How Telecommunications is Shaping Urban Spaces

How Telecommunications is Shaping Urban Spaces
J. Wheeler et. al., eds. Fractionated Geographies: Cities in the Telecommunications Age

Moss, M. & Townsend, A.
01/01/2004

All too often, telecommunications systems are treated as an alternative to transportation systems, as a substitute for the physical movement of people and services. The growing use of telecommunications systems is doing far more than influence where people work and live, but is actually changing the character of activities that occur in the home, workplace, and automobile. This chapter examines the way in which information and telecommunications are transforming everyday urban life; making the home into an extension of the office, shopping mall, and classroom; allowing the automobile and airplane to become workplaces; and converting the office building into a hub for social interaction and interpersonal contact. The diffusion of information technologies drastically increases the complexity of cities by increasing the number and type of interactions among individuals, firms, technical systems and the external environment. Information systems are permitting new combinations of people, equipment, and places; as a result, there is a dramatic change in the spatial organization of activities within cities and large metropolitan regions.

Sustaining Urban Networks: The Social Diffusion of Large Technical Systems

Sustaining Urban Networks: The Social Diffusion of Large Technical Systems
London, UK: Routledge,

Coutard, O., R. Hanley & Zimmerman, R., eds.
01/01/2004

Telecommunications, transportation, energy and water supply networks have gained crucial importance in the functioning of modern social systems over the past 100 to 150 years. Sustaining Urban Networks studies the development of these networks and the economic, social and environmental issues associated with it.

Taking sustainability in its triple economic, environmental and social dimensions, contributors such as Bernard Barraque and Olivier Coutard take stock of previous research on large technical systems and discuss sustainability from three main perspectives: uses, cities, rules/institutions.

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