Urban Planning

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Fall 2004, Vol. 8, No. 1.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Editor.
01/01/2004

This issue discusses the state transportation and MTA financing issues, value pricing efforts at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the use of green design in transit projects and the history and current vision for the Bronx's Grand Concourse.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Spring/Summer 2004, Vol. 7, No. 2.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Editor.
01/01/2004

This issue considers the diverse ways that transportation can engage with its context, from its place in Downtown Brooklyn and central cities to engineering for the pedestrian environment or ADA compliance.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Fall 2004, Vol. 8, No. 1.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Editor.
01/01/2004

The Journal's editor, together with publisher Elliot Sander, the Editorial Board, and our volunteer authors, put together an issue that discusses the state transportation and MTA financing issues, a discussion of value pricing efforts at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the use of green design in transit projects and history and current vision for the Bronx's Grand Concourse.

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: A School-Based Social and Emotional Learning Program

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program: A School-Based Social and Emotional Learning Program
In J.E. Zins, R.P. Weissberg, M.C. Wang, & H.J. Walberg (Eds.), Building academic success on social and emotional learning: What does the research say? (pp.151-169). New York, NY: Teachers College Press,

Brown, J.L., Roderick, T., Lantieri, L. & Aber, J.L.
01/01/2004

The Resolving Conflict Creatively Program (RCCP) is one of the oldest and largest school-based conflict resolution programs in the United States. Beginning in 1994, we planned and implemented a rigorous scientific evaluation of the RCCP, involving over 350 teachers and 11,000 children from 15 public elementary schools in New York City. In this chapter, we describe the RCCP, explain the rationale for and design of the study, summarize the major results related to the program's impact on children's trajectories of social and emotional learning (SEL) and academic achievement, and discuss the implications of these findings for research, practice, and policy.

The Role of Cities in Providing Housing Assistance: A New York Perspective

The Role of Cities in Providing Housing Assistance: A New York Perspective
In Amy Ellen Schwartz, ed., City Taxes, City Spending: Essays in Honor of Dick Netzer. Northampton, Mass: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.,

Ellen, I.G., Schill, M.H., Schwartz, A.E. & Voicu, I.
01/01/2004

In a festschrift to Netzer-a public finance economist well known for his research on state and local taxation, urban public services, and nonprofit organizations-eight chapters apply microeconomics to problems facing urban areas and use statistical analysis to gain insight into practical solutions. The essays look at alternative methods of financing urban government, such as a land value tax and the impact of sales and income taxes on property taxation; at government expenditures, including housing subsidies; and at subsidies to nonprofit arts groups as well as the role of the nonprofit sector in providing K-12 education. Of interest to the fields of public finance, urban economics, and public administration.

West Side Financing’s Complex $1.3 Billion Story

West Side Financing’s Complex $1.3 Billion Story
Independent Budget Office for New York City, August

Devine, T.
01/01/2004

The Bloomberg administration's Hudson Yards project proposes a major redevelopment of Manhattan’s far West Side. The plan includes a city investment of roughly $3 billion (in 2003 dollars) to upgrade the district and facilitate the construction of thousands of new apartments and millions of square feet of new office and other commercial space. Among the proposed improvements are the extension of the #7 subway line, the construction of a platform over the Eastern Rail Yards, and the creation of a new boulevard and new parkland.

Funding Analysis for Long-Term Planning

Funding Analysis for Long-Term Planning
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, July

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
07/01/2003

In existence since 1956, the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) is the source of nearly all federal highway funding and roughly four-fifths of all federal transit funding. The Highway Trust Fund is integral to the long-term transportation planning of all 50 states. However, recent Congressional Budget Office forecasts show that at the current baselines (i.e. spending at currently enacted levels with adjustments for inflation within the context of current tax policies), the Highway Account of the HTF would be depleted by 2006 and the Mass Transit Account would fall to $0 three years later. These projections have been made in the midst of discussions regarding the reauthorization for surface transportation and the looming national needs in transportation that require an estimated average annual investment from all levels of government of between $90.7 billion and $110.9 billion just to maintain the system and between $127.5 billion and $169.5 billion to improve it.

Dividing the Pie: Placing the Transportation Donor-Donee Debate in Perspective

Dividing the Pie: Placing the Transportation Donor-Donee Debate in Perspective
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, May

Seaman, M. & de Cerreño, A.L.C
05/01/2003

This study looks at the distribution of dollars of federal transportation funding to the states from a number of perspectives. The analysis reveals relative winners and losers at the regional and state level based on various criteria. It also shows that in many respects, New York receives a very low or at best, average apportionment of federal transportation dollars. It also shows that while New York receives more in federal highway funding than it pays in highway taxes, this 'surplus' is dwarfed by the state's overall deficit with Washington, D.C.

ITS Challenges for the Tri-State Metro Region

ITS Challenges for the Tri-State Metro Region
New York Transportation Journal, Winter 2003, Vol. 6, No. 2.

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
01/01/2003

Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) have gone beyond futuristic ideals and are becoming mainstream tools for managing highway and transit systems, as well as for providing information to the public. ITS has shown itself to be a cost-effective means for making best use of the current transportation system in an environment where the ability to expand capacity has become increasingly more difficult and expensive. There are several projects already in place at the regional level (e.g. E-ZPass, Transcom's IRVIN system, and MetroCard) and at the local level (e.g. sub-area traffic management centers and transit system real-time train information systems). More major ITS systems are expected in the next few years.

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