Eric G. Galipo
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Urban Planning

Formerly with the New York City Department of City Planning, Brooklyn Borough Office, Eric Galipo is an experienced project planner and urban designer. At H3, Eric is responsible for concept development for urban planning and design projects. Eric has worked on plans for the Newark Downtown District Streetscape and the Take Me To The River project in West Harlem. He has also completed plans for Military Park (Newark, NJ), Round Rock Texas Arts Master Plan, Native Plant Garden Education Pavilion at the New York Botanical Gardens (Bronx, NY), Harford County Center for the Arts Master Plan, and Emily Bayless Graham Park Master Plan (Bel Air, MD).

A member of the American Institute of Certified Planners, the American Planning Association and a fellow of the Institute for Urban Design, Eric has a Master of Urban Planning from New York University and a Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from North Carolina State University.

Semester Course
Fall 2014 URPL-GP.1620.001 Introduction to Urban Physical Design

This course will concentrate on design, research, interpretation and analysis of urban spaces in New York City, with discussion of the region, the country and abroad. The introductory nature of the course necessitates overview of a broad range of topics rather than in-depth exploration of each topic. However, all course materials and work will relate to the forces that shape urban form. By the end of the course, each student will develop an awareness of the built environment and the critical elements required for successful place making. Learning throughout the semester will be project-centered with hands-on application of physical planning and design. Students will focus on planning process during the first half of the semester and development for the remainder.


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Fall 2013 URPL-GP.1620.001 Introduction to Urban Physical Design

This course will concentrate on design, research, interpretation and analysis of urban spaces in New York City, with discussion of the region, the country and abroad. The introductory nature of the course necessitates overview of a broad range of topics rather than in-depth exploration of each topic. However, all course materials and work will relate to the forces that shape urban form. By the end of the course, each student will develop an awareness of the built environment and the critical elements required for successful place making. Learning throughout the semester will be project-centered with hands-on application of physical planning and design. Students will focus on planning process during the first half of the semester and development for the remainder.


Download Syllabus