Lucy MacPhail

Lucy MacPhail
Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management

Lucy MacPhail's research examines group, organizational and institutional influences on work processes, performance and learning in health care delivery settings. She is broadly interested in the conditions under which complex organizations deliver safe, effective services and the processes by which professionals negotiate role boundaries when performing interdependent work. Her dissertation examined the resilience, management and correction of work process failure in acute and primary care delivery settings. MacPhail has also co-authored publications on coordination of care and multidisciplinary collaboration in knowledge-intensive task environments. In 2010 she received a Ph.D. in Health Policy from Harvard University in the degree program's Management specialization at Harvard Business School. Prior to her doctorate, MacPhail received a Bachelor of Arts in History and Literature, also from Harvard, and worked as a health care research analyst at The Advisory Board Company in Washington, D.C.

Semester Course
Spring 2013 HPAM-GP.1830.001 Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This introductory course in the Health Policy and Management program explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system
and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and
practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


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Fall 2012 EXEC-GP.1830.001 Introduction to Health Policy and Management for Nurse Leaders

Only open to Executive MPA students.

This course explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2012 HPAM-GP.1830.001 Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This introductory course in the Health Policy and Management program explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system
and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and
practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2012 HPAM-GP.1830.002 Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This introductory course in the Health Policy and Management program explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system
and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and
practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2012 HPAM-GP.1830.001 Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This introductory course in the Health Policy and Management program explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system
and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and
practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 HPAM-GP.1830.002 Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This introductory course in the Health Policy and Management program explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system
and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and
practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


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Fall 2011 HPAM-GP.4833.001 Health Care Management I: Control and Organizational Design

This is a 2-credit course intended for graduate students and is designed to study how to manage in and lead health care organizations (HCOs). Topics covered will include: the use of evidence-based management in health care, how health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations, how performance control systems work in health care organizations, management of acute and chronic care delivery systems, and models of accountable health care systems.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 HPAM-GP.1830.002 Introduction to Health Policy and Management

Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This introductory course in the Health Policy and Management program explores core topics in the study of health and health care delivery in the United States. We will discuss the distribution of health and disease in society, the organization of the U.S. health care system
and roles and behaviors of its key actors, the historical context for developments in public health and medicine, the quality and accessibility of health care services, and current events in health care reform. We will examine major themes in health care policy and
practice using an interdisciplinary approach that employs sociological, political, economic and ethical perspectives on health and disease, characteristics of health care in the U.S., and the complexity of achieving high quality and affordability given the varied (and sometimes conflicting) motivations of policy-makers, payers, providers and patients. Students will also consider the U.S. health care system in an international context to provide a comparative lens on its nature and performance versus those of other industrialized nations. The objective of this course is to build understanding of fundamental ideas and problems in the areas of health and medical care and thereby to provide a strong foundation for future studies and careers in the health care field.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 HPAM-GP.1833.001 Health Services Management
Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This course is intended for graduate students and is about learning how to manage in health care organizations (HCOs).

At the end of this course, students will understand:
• Use of evidence-based management in health care.
• How health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations.
• How health care organizations assess and adapt to change.
• How performance control systems work in HCOs.
• Constraints/opportunities in shaping organizational performance and managerial careers.

Students will also learn to work better with others on team projects, and improve their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills.
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Date Publication/Paper
2011

MacPhail, L., and A. Edmondson. 2011. The Importance of Work Context in Organizational Learning from Error Errors in Organizations. D. Hoffman & M. Frese, eds. Psychology Press, 2011.
Abstract

2009

MacPhail, L., E. Neuwirth, & J. Bellows. 2009. Coordination of Diabetes Care in Four Delivery Models Using an Electronic Health Record Medical Care 47(9): 993-999.
Abstract

Background: Care coordination is essential to effective chronic care, but knowledge of processes by which health care professionals coordinate their activities when caring for chronically ill patients is limited. Electronic health records (EHRs) are expected to facilitate coordination of care, but whether they do so completely-and under what conditions-is not well understood.

Objectives: To identify processes by which providers worked together to provide care using an EHR and to examine factors supporting coordination of care.

Design: Qualitative multiple case study in 4 sites with diverse care delivery models, using semi-structured in-person interviews with 46 physicians and staff and telephone interviews with 65 adult patients with diabetes.

Setting: Four Kaiser Permanente medical centers.

Results: Across all care models, physicians and staff acted sequentially as loosely coupled links in a chain, relying on EHR-enabled informational continuity to coordinate care. Of providers, 94% were highly satisfied with the availability of patient information, and 89% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the coordination of their care. However, 6 of 65 patients described experiences of uncoordinated care, and 5 of 12 primary care providers identified coordination issues. These pertained to unreconciled differences of opinion, conflicting role expectations, and discipline-specific views of patient needs.

Conclusions: Diabetes care can be coordinated across providers, but some coordination issues persist despite the informational continuity provided by an EHR. Multidisciplinary care teams should be alert to potential coordination challenges, and possible solutions should be explored, including longitudinal care planning with structured communications at key points in care.

 

MacPhail, L., K. Roloff, & A. Edmondson. 2009. Collaboration Across Knowledge Boundaries: Reciprocal Expertise Affirmation as an Enabling Condition Exploring Positive Identities and Organizations: Building a Theoretical and Research Foundation. L.M. Roberts & J. Dutton, eds. Psychology Press, 2009.
Abstract