Shanna Rose

Shanna Rose
Clinical Assistant Professor

Shanna Rose is a political scientist with expertise in government budgeting, state politics, federalism, and health policy. Her recently published book, Financing Medicaid: Federalism and the Growth of America's Health Care Safety Net (University of Michigan Press) examines the role of fiscal federalism in driving the growth of public spending on health care for low-income Americans. A current project, States as Stakeholders: Federalism and Policy Feedback in the United States (with Andrew Karch), investigates the effects of federal policy initiatives on state political dynamics, comparing programs in a variety of policy arenas including health care, transportation, and education. Her research also has appeared in The Journal of Politics, Public Administration Review, and Public Choice, among others. Professor Rose currently teaches The Politics of Public Policy at the undergraduate level and Introduction to Public Policy at the graduate level. She also has experience teaching a variety of courses related to government budgeting, American politics, political economy, and empirical methods. She is the recipient of several teaching awards including Professor of the Year at NYU Wagner and the Dean's Award for Excellence in Student Teaching at the Harvard Kennedy School. She holds a Ph.D. in political economy and government from Harvard University.

Semester Course
Spring 2014 UPADM-GP.101.001 The Politics of Public Policy

This course provides an introduction to the political institutions and processes through which public policy is made and implemented in the United States (although the key concepts are applicable to other political systems as well). The course also introduces students to the tools of policy analysis. The first half of the course presents the major models of policymaking and policy analysis. The second half of the course applies these concepts to specific policy areas such as health, education, and environment, as illustrated by real-world case studiesThe course emphasizes written and oral communication through the development of professional memo-writing and presentation skills.


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Spring 2014 CORE-GP.1022.001 Introduction to Public Policy

Introduction to Public Policy covers a wide range of topics, from the norms and values informing democratic policymaking to the basics of cost-benefit and other tools of policy analysis. Though emphases will differ based on instructor strengths, all sections will address the institutional arrangements for making public policy decisions, the role of various actors-including nonprofit and private-sector professionals-in shaping policy outcomes, and the fundamentals (and limits) of analytic approaches to public policy.

Note: Students who have not taken an American Government course in many years, and need to brush up on knowledge of the basic design and functions of the governmental units in the United States, are strongly encouraged to take Introduction to Governance (NONCR-0989) module prior to taking Introduction to Public Policy.


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Spring 2013 CORE-GP.1021.001 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


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Spring 2013 NONCR-GP.0933.001 Excel Module II

This workshop introduces students to Excel’s advanced tools for data analysis and modeling. Topics include shortcut keys, sorting and filtering, conditional formatting, macros, a variety of formulas (if, lookup, index, match, etc.), array formulas, graphing, pivot tables and charts, what-if analysis (scenario manager, goal seek, and data tables), and regression analysis.


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Fall 2012 PADM-GP.2143.001 Government Budgeting

This course provides an introduction to government budgeting. The first half of the course consists of lectures, case studies, and memo-writing; the second half consists of a budgeting laboratory in which students work in teams to prepare a budget for a local government. Throughout the course, students will have a chance to apply the tools learned in the core financial management course, such as net present value and variance analysis; acquire additional financial management tools, such as revenue-forecasting techniques; and further develop their Excel skills, particularly the creation and use of pivot tables.


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Fall 2012 NONCR-GP.0933.001 Excel Module II

This workshop introduces students to Excel’s advanced tools for data analysis and modeling. Topics include shortcut keys, sorting and filtering, conditional formatting, macros, a variety of formulas (if, lookup, index, match, etc.), array formulas, graphing, pivot tables and charts, what-if analysis (scenario manager, goal seek, and data tables), and regression analysis.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2012 CORE-GP.1021.001 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2012 NONCR-GP.0933.001 Excel Module II

This workshop introduces students to Excel’s advanced tools for data analysis and modeling. Topics include shortcut keys, sorting and filtering, conditional formatting, macros, a variety of formulas (if, lookup, index, match, etc.), array formulas, graphing, pivot tables and charts, what-if analysis (scenario manager, goal seek, and data tables), and regression analysis.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2012 CORE-GP.1021.003 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 NONCR-GP.0933.001 Excel Module II

This workshop introduces students to Excel’s advanced tools for data analysis and modeling. Topics include shortcut keys, sorting and filtering, conditional formatting, macros, a variety of formulas (if, lookup, index, match, etc.), array formulas, graphing, pivot tables and charts, what-if analysis (scenario manager, goal seek, and data tables), and regression analysis.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 CORE-GP.1021.001 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 NONCR-GP.0120.001 Excel Module II

This workshop introduces students to Excel’s advanced tools for data analysis and modeling. Topics include shortcut keys, sorting and filtering, conditional formatting, macros, a variety of formulas (if, lookup, index, match, etc.), array formulas, graphing, pivot tables and charts, what-if analysis (scenario manager, goal seek, and data tables), and regression analysis.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 PADM-GP.2143.001 Government Budgeting

This course provides an introduction to government budgeting. The first half of the course consists of lectures, case studies, and memo-writing; the second half consists of a budgeting laboratory in which students work in teams to prepare a budget for a local government. Throughout the course, students will have a chance to apply the tools learned in the core financial management course, such as net present value and variance analysis; acquire additional financial management tools, such as revenue-forecasting techniques; and further develop their Excel skills, particularly the creation and use of pivot tables.


Download Syllabus
Summer 2010 PADM-GP.2140.001 Public Economics and Finance

Public finance (the economic analysis of revenues and expenditures of the public sector) and public economics (economic analysis of the public sector in a market economy) analyze the impact of public policy on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in the economy. In this course, you will learn how to interpret economic analyses and how to use the tools of microeconomics and empirical analysis to investigate and predict the effects of public expenditures, regulation and government revenue-raising activities.


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Spring 2010 CORE-GP.1021.001 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 PADM-GP.2143.001 Government Budgeting

This course provides an introduction to government budgeting. The first half of the course consists of lectures, case studies, and memo-writing; the second half consists of a budgeting laboratory in which students work in teams to prepare a budget for a local government. Throughout the course, students will have a chance to apply the tools learned in the core financial management course, such as net present value and variance analysis; acquire additional financial management tools, such as revenue-forecasting techniques; and further develop their Excel skills, particularly the creation and use of pivot tables.


Download Syllabus
Summer 2009 PADM-GP.2140.001 Public Economics and Finance

Public finance (the economic analysis of revenues and expenditures of the public sector) and public economics (economic analysis of the public sector in a market economy) analyze the impact of public policy on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in the economy. In this course, you will learn how to interpret economic analyses and how to use the tools of microeconomics and empirical analysis to investigate and predict the effects of public expenditures, regulation and government revenue-raising activities.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 CORE-GP.1021.002 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 PADM-GP.2143.001 Government Budgeting

This course provides an introduction to government budgeting. The first half of the course consists of lectures, case studies, and memo-writing; the second half consists of a budgeting laboratory in which students work in teams to prepare a budget for a local government. Throughout the course, students will have a chance to apply the tools learned in the core financial management course, such as net present value and variance analysis; acquire additional financial management tools, such as revenue-forecasting techniques; and further develop their Excel skills, particularly the creation and use of pivot tables.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 CORE-GP.1021. Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations

In this core course in financial management, students will learn the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting for public, health, and not-for-profit organizations. Through readings, lectures, real-world case studies, and assignments, students will gain an understanding of how to use financial information in organizational planning, implementation, control, reporting, and analysis. In addition, students will have the chance to develop their spreadsheet skills by using Excel to perform financial calculations and create financial documents.

The first half of the course focuses on managerial accounting, a set of tools used by managers for planning, implementation, and control. Topics in this portion of the course include operating budgets, cash budgets, break-even analysis, indirect cost allocation, variance analysis, the time value of money, capital budgeting, and long-term financing.

The second half of the course focuses on financial accounting, a set of tools used by managers and outside observers for reporting on and analyzing an organization’s financial health. Topics in this portion of the course include the preparation and analysis of financial statements (balance sheet, activity statement, and cash flow statement), ethics in financial management, and government accounting and financial condition analysis.


Download Syllabus
Date Publication/Paper
2013

Shanna Rose 2013. Financing Medicaid: Federalism and the Growth of America's Health Care Safety Net University of Michigan Press
Abstract

Medicaid has evolved over the past five decades from a tiny “welfare medicine” program into the single largest health insurance program in the United States. Contrary to the conventional wisdom that programs for the poor are vulnerable to instability and retrenchment because they lack a powerful constituency, This book finds that, as a result of its unique institutional structure, Medicaid does, in fact, have an organized, influential interest group: the nation’s governors. Although governors routinely criticize Medicaid for its mounting cost to the states, they have found it difficult to resist the powerful expansionary incentives created by the program’s open-ended federal matching grants. Throughout the program’s history, state leaders have used a variety of methods ranging from lobbying and negotiation to creative financing mechanisms and waivers to maximize federal aid, thereby fueling Medicaid’s growth. And, perceiving federal retrenchment efforts as a threat to their states’ financial interests, the governors have repeatedly worked together in bipartisan fashion to defend the program against cutbacks. Indeed, Rose argues, Medicaid has been a driving force behind the mobilization of the intergovernmental lobby, and specifically the National Governors Association—one of the most powerful interest groups in Washington. Financing Medicaid intertwines theory, historical narrative, and case studies, drawing on a variety of sources including archival materials from gubernatorial and presidential libraries and the National Governors Association.

Charles Brecher and Shanna Rose 2013. Medicaid's Next Metamorphosis Public Administration Review, Vol 73, no. 4
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Abstract

Medicaid’s transformation since its inception rivals the biological changes of metamorphosis, and that process is not yet over. Past metamorphoses are the change from a small program with eligibility linked to the states’ cash welfare benefits to one with national eligibility standards covering many not receiving cash benefits, from a traditional fee-for-service payment program to one dominated by capitated managed care arrangements, and under the ACA to a widely accepted component of a national system for near universal insurance coverage. An analysis of the forces behind these significant changes suggests that future transformations are likely, and four potential scenarios are presented and assessed.

2012

Rose, Shanna, and Daniel L. Smith. 2012. Budget Slack, Institutions, and Transparency Public Administration Review 72(2): 187-95
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Abstract

Economic theory suggests that it is optimal for governments to use precautionary saving as a countercyclical tool. However, the availability of surplus funds often triggers political pressure for tax cuts and spending increases. Mechanisms for alleviating that pressure include limiting the transparency of slack resources and limiting politicians' discretion to use slack resources for purposes other than stabilization. This article investigates the extent to which these two mechanisms are substitutes. In particular, the authors examine whether the widespread adoption of budget stabilization funds (BSFs) in the U.S. states over the past several decades has been accompanied by a decline in conservative revenue forecast bias. Using panel data from 47 states over a 22-year period, they find that the adoption of a BSF reduces revenue underestimation by approximately two-thirds; however, the size of the effect depends in part on how much a state saves in the BSF and the rules governing BSF deposits and withdrawals. The results suggest that BSFs have the unintended effect of increasing fiscal transparency.

2011

Rose, Shanna. 2011. Book review of Health Care Reform and American Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know by Lawrence R. Jacobs and Theda Skocpol Political Science Quarterly 126(3): 509-510.
Abstract

Rose, S. 2011. Disentangling Accountability and Competence in Elections: Evidence from U.S. Term Limits With James Alt and Ethan Bueno de Mesquita.  The Journal of Politics 73 (1): 171-186.
Abstract

We exploit variation in U.S. gubernatorial term limits across states and time to empirically estimate two separate effects of elections on government performance. Holding tenure in office constant, differences in performance by reelection-eligible and term-limited incumbents identify an accountability effect: reelection-eligible governors have greater incentives to exert costly effort on behalf of voters. Holding term-limit status constant, differences in performance by incumbents in different terms identify a competence effect: later-term incumbents are more likely to be competent both because they have survived reelection and because they have experience in office. We show that economic growth is higher and taxes, spending, and borrowing costs are lower under reelection-eligible incumbents than under term-limited incumbents (accountability), and under reelected incumbents than under first-term incumbents (competence), all else equal. In addition to improving our understanding of the role of elections in representative democracy, these findings resolve an empirical puzzle about the disappearance of the effect of term limits on gubernatorial performance over time.

2010

Rose, S. 2010. Institutions and Fiscal Sustainability National Tax Journal 63 (4): 807–838.
Abstract

As budgetary commitments outpace current revenues and long-term liabilities balloon, the fiscal sustainability of state and local governments is a matter of mounting concern. Over the years, these governments have experimented with a wide variety of political and fiscal institutions, ranging from direct democracy to balanced budget rules, with the goal of slowing the growth of government and increasing financial responsibility. This article synthesizes the related empirical literature, summarizing what we know (and don’t know) about the effectiveness of various rules and procedures in promoting fiscal sustainability.

2008

Rose, Shanna and Dall Forsythe. 2008. Closing State Deficit Requires Prudence Albany Times Union. December 10, 2008.
Abstract

Rose, S. 2008. Intergovernmental Aid and Mandates Political Encyclopedia of U.S. States and Regions. Edited by Donald Haider-Markel. Congressional Quarterly Press. Washington, D.C.
Abstract

General editor Haider-Markel (U. of Kansas) presents a two-volume encyclopedia intended to serve as a first-stop reference on state politics in the United States, which also includes some coverage of US overseas territories and Puerto Rico. The encyclopedia opens with four broad topical essays on the evolution and impact of state constitutions, the impact of direct democracy (voter initiatives and the like), cooperation between the states, and states as policy testing grounds. It then presents individual state profiles, about ten pages each, that are uniformly structured to allow comparison of state history, the political environment, elections and voting behavior, the legislative branch, the executive branch, the judicial branch, intergovernmental relations, state-tribal relations (where applicable), and long-term issues and policy trends. The state entries also include bibliographies; charts showing partisan distribution of presidential elections from 1988 to 2004; and data tables on political history, political environment, elections and voting behavior, the legislative branch, the executive branch, and the judicial branch. Also included are some 175 A-to-Z topical entries discussing general concepts related to governmental functions and procedures, government structures and bodies, political theory, and political behavior. Examples of specific topics would include gerrymandering, impeachment, public health, auditor, bicameralism, legislative leadership, common law, judicial review, and social welfare. Finally, statistical data on populations, economics, finance, the environment, government spending, voting, and campaign fundraising is presented for all 50 states, followed by a comprehensive index.

Rose, S. 2008. The Political Manipulation of U.S. State Rainy Day Funds under Rules versus Discretion State Politics and Policy Quarterly 8(2): 150-176.
Abstract

Anecdotal evidence suggests that politicians manipulate rainy day funds for political purposes, but such claims remain untested in the literature. This article finds that lawmakers withdraw nearly three times more funds in response to a deficit shock of a given size if the shock occurs in an election year rather than a non-election year; this occurs despite the fact that the magnitude of shocks does not vary over the electoral cycle. This effect is stronger when incumbents are eligible for re-election than when they are term-limited. When it comes to preventing political manipulation, rainy day fund rules that increase the number of veto players who must approve of withdrawals seem to be more effective than rules that specify the economic conditions under which funds may be withdrawn.

2007

Rose, S. & J. Alt. 2007. Context-Conditional Political Budget Cycles in Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics, Carles Boix and Susan Stokes, eds, Oxford University Press.
Abstract

We investigate electorally-induced fluctuations in spending with two questions in mind: "Under what circumstances is it more feasible? Under what circumstances is it more desirable?" Using data on the US states, we find a clear effect of balanced budget laws: states that restrict politicians' ability to issue debt to cover spending shortfalls simply do not exhibit political budget cycles. The probability of re-election also is important: the expected closeness of the upcoming election, measured by moderate levels of gubernatorial job approval, is associated with larger pre-election surges in spending. Low newspaper circulation is also associated with substantially larger budget cycles. Other results (divided government, transparency) did not come out clearly, as they had in some cross-national studies.
2006

Rose, S. 2006. Do Fiscal Rules Dampen the Political Business Cycle? Public Choice 128: 407-431.
Abstract

This paper develops and tests the theory that fiscal rules limit politicians' ability to manipulate the budget for electoral gain. Using panel data from the American states, I find evidence suggesting that stringent balanced budget rules dampen the political business cycle. That is, while spending rises before and falls after elections in states that can carry deficits into the next fiscal year, this pattern does not exist in states with strict "no-carry" rules. Neither binding gubernatorial term limits nor the partisan composition of government appear to significantly affect the magnitude of the political business cycle.

Alt, J.E., Lassen, D.D. & Rose, S. 2006. The Causes of Fiscal Transparency: Evidence from the American States IMF Staff Papers, Special Issue, Vol. 53, pp. 30-57.
Abstract

We use unique panel data on the evolution of transparent budget procedures in the American states over the past three decades to explore the political and economic determinants of fiscal transparency. Our preliminary results suggest that more equal political competition and power sharing are associated with both greater levels of fiscal transparency and increases in fiscal transparency during the sample period. Political polarization is associated with lower transparency, and past fiscal conditions also appear to affect the level of transparency.