Category Archives: bikes

What We’re Reading This Week

What we’ve read online this week:

  • The importance of building Hudson River rail tunnels (Link)
  • Microtransit: A combination of public transit and Uber (Link)
  • New traffic signals for cyclists in London (Link)
  • An app to make parking less painful (Link)
  • Planning for the good and bad of electric tricycles in the Philippines (Link)
  • Our report on Citi Bike, and its low female ridership, was featured in The New York Times(Link)
  • The report was also highlighted in a Pix11 report; here’s the video:


Photo Above By: Sean Batten                                                                              Post By: Sean Lewin

What We Read Last Week

What we read online last week:

  • Smart Cars on rails?  (Link)
  • Citi Bike in the hot seat on uptown expansion (Link)
  • What’s the history behind your neighborhood’s name?  (Link)
  • Are companies like Uber and Lyft responsible for NYC’s recent rise in congestion?  (Link)
  • More than 700 hidden miles of NYC are ripe for development (Link)
  • Building efficiency in public construction for NY State  (Link)

Photo Above By: CTA Web

By: Sean Lewin

Citi Bike: The First Two Years

Cyclists have taken more than 13.6 million trips on Citi Bike since its launch in May 2013. Bike share has become an integral part of New York’s transportation culture; a new report from the NYU Rudin Center, “Citi Bike: The First Two Years,” analyzes Citi Bike’s success and offers policy suggestions for the future.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY   /    DOWNLOAD THE REPORT

Image above: NYC DOT Flickr

What We’re Reading This Week

What we’re reading online this week:

  • In case you missed it, we’ve mapped out the history of NYC’s pride parade (link)
  • Say goodbye to the Crown Victoria; the Taxi of Tomorrow is coming  (Link)
  • NY’s bus ridership might be decreasing, but Boston’s is booming  (Link)
  • What effect will self-driving cars have on companies like Uber and Zipcar?  (Link)
  • DC aiming to be a hub for transportation innovation  (Link)
  • It takes a village to find a parking spot (in Brooklyn) (Link)
  • Philadelphia’s bikeshare is wildly popular (Link)

Photo By: Solenne Durand                                                                                              Post By: Sean Lewin

What we’re reading this week

What we’re reading online this week:

  • Central and Prospect Park rush hour car traffic is reduced (Link)
  • Charter Bus startup looking to fill in transit gaps for residents of the outer boroughs (Link)
  • 3D print a bridge for your city (Link)
  • MTA Bus drivers conduct protest while on the job, clogging up parts of the city   (Link)
  • UES bicycle hit-and-run leads to offer of safety classes (Link)
  • De Blasio and Cuomo differ on picks for MTA board (Link)

And in case you missed it, we’ve launched our applications for this year’s Emerging Leaders in Transportation program. See more information here.

Photo: Traffic in Kuala Lumpur by Michael Loke

By: Sean Lewin

The Future of the Streetscape Photos

Last night’s discussion about the future of the streetscape was exciting! We’re looking forward to a collaborative planning process for whatever comes our way. Thanks to our thoughtful and energetic panelists:

  • Sean Basinski, Director of the Street Vendor Project
  • Neil Giacobbi, Executive Director, Public Affairs, AT&T
  • Stacey Hodge, Director of the Office of Freight Mobility, NYCDOT
  • Jeff Risom, Partner and Managing Director, Gehl Studio
  • Dani Simons, Director of Corporate Communications & External affairs, Motivate
  • Rodney Stiles, Director of Research & Evaluation at New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission
  • Anthony Townsend, Senior Researcher at NYU Rudin Center for Transportation
  • Moderator: Sarah Kaufman, Assistant Director for Technology Programming, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

and thank you to the Van Alen Institute for the great photos and gracious hosting.

What we’re reading this week

What we’ve read this week:

  • “The architecture becomes a solution to an almost unsolvable puzzle.” Designing 2 World Trade Center (Link)
  • Citi Bike to release new fleet of upgraded bikes (Link)
  • Staten Island pushes for travel by Tram (Link)
  • Old subway photos show packed train cars in vintage form (Link)
  • An underground park could be making its way to the LES, pending Kickstarter donations (Link)
  • Transit travel is severely limited by the shortage of wheelchair accessible subway stations, as shown on this map (Link)

Photo By: IamNigelMorris                                                                                              By Sean Lewin

What we’re reading this week

Articles of the week:

  • Coming soon? Heads-up display attachment on a bike helmet   (Link)
  • LaGuardia inches toward a much-needed face lift   (Link)
  • Should New Yorkers wear seat belts in taxis?  (Link)
  • Uber, on its five-year anniversary, talks future plans  (Link)
  • A new app for parking ticket magnets (Link)
  • Local high school seniors come up with solution to fix MTA’s garbage crisis                                                                                                              (Link)

Photo By: Jackie.lck                                                                                                       By Sean Lewin

What we’re reading online this week

What we’re reading online this week:
  • NYC to increase Ferry Service throughout boroughs (link)
  • New plan to elevate Bikers in San Fran (link)
  • NY State Biking rating may surprise you (link)
  • 97% of subway stations are not cleaned regularly enough (link)
  • New York’s gay nightlife, the interactive map (link)
By Sean Lewin
Image: Anandapur Transportation by Scott Smith

80 Bicicletas

We’re proud to announce the publication of Sarah Kaufman’s essay, “Citi Bike Y Pantaloncillos” (Citi Bike and Pantaloons) in the new book La Vuelta al Mundo en 80 Bicicletas (Around the World in 80 Bicycles). The essay describes gender disparities in Citi Bike usage and how they relate to the women’s liberation movement of the 1890s.

The book is available here.