Category Archives: citibike

What We Read Last Week

What we read online last week:

  • Smart Cars on rails?  (Link)
  • Citi Bike in the hot seat on uptown expansion (Link)
  • What’s the history behind your neighborhood’s name?  (Link)
  • Are companies like Uber and Lyft responsible for NYC’s recent rise in congestion?  (Link)
  • More than 700 hidden miles of NYC are ripe for development (Link)
  • Building efficiency in public construction for NY State  (Link)

Photo Above By: CTA Web

By: Sean Lewin

What we’re reading this week

What we’re reading online this week:

  • Central and Prospect Park rush hour car traffic is reduced (Link)
  • Charter Bus startup looking to fill in transit gaps for residents of the outer boroughs (Link)
  • 3D print a bridge for your city (Link)
  • MTA Bus drivers conduct protest while on the job, clogging up parts of the city   (Link)
  • UES bicycle hit-and-run leads to offer of safety classes (Link)
  • De Blasio and Cuomo differ on picks for MTA board (Link)

And in case you missed it, we’ve launched our applications for this year’s Emerging Leaders in Transportation program. See more information here.

Photo: Traffic in Kuala Lumpur by Michael Loke

By: Sean Lewin

The Future of the Streetscape Photos

Last night’s discussion about the future of the streetscape was exciting! We’re looking forward to a collaborative planning process for whatever comes our way. Thanks to our thoughtful and energetic panelists:

  • Sean Basinski, Director of the Street Vendor Project
  • Neil Giacobbi, Executive Director, Public Affairs, AT&T
  • Stacey Hodge, Director of the Office of Freight Mobility, NYCDOT
  • Jeff Risom, Partner and Managing Director, Gehl Studio
  • Dani Simons, Director of Corporate Communications & External affairs, Motivate
  • Rodney Stiles, Director of Research & Evaluation at New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission
  • Anthony Townsend, Senior Researcher at NYU Rudin Center for Transportation
  • Moderator: Sarah Kaufman, Assistant Director for Technology Programming, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

and thank you to the Van Alen Institute for the great photos and gracious hosting.

What we’re reading this week

What we’ve read this week:

  • “The architecture becomes a solution to an almost unsolvable puzzle.” Designing 2 World Trade Center (Link)
  • Citi Bike to release new fleet of upgraded bikes (Link)
  • Staten Island pushes for travel by Tram (Link)
  • Old subway photos show packed train cars in vintage form (Link)
  • An underground park could be making its way to the LES, pending Kickstarter donations (Link)
  • Transit travel is severely limited by the shortage of wheelchair accessible subway stations, as shown on this map (Link)

Photo By: IamNigelMorris                                                                                              By Sean Lewin

80 Bicicletas

We’re proud to announce the publication of Sarah Kaufman’s essay, “Citi Bike Y Pantaloncillos” (Citi Bike and Pantaloons) in the new book La Vuelta al Mundo en 80 Bicicletas (Around the World in 80 Bicycles). The essay describes gender disparities in Citi Bike usage and how they relate to the women’s liberation movement of the 1890s.

The book is available here.

 

The Rudin Center in the News

The NYU Rudin Center has appeared in the press recently, discussing policy, tech and social media:

  • Smart buses and public transportation can be compatible – Sarah Kaufman in Wired. (link)
  • How NYC “has merit as a subject of art” – Mitchell Moss in the Wall Street Journal. (link)
  • Benefits of Citi Bike’s weekend reset – Mitchell Moss in The New York Times. (link)
  • Social media keeps transit riders informed – Sarah Kaufman in Government Technology. (link)
  • Anthony Townsend named to Chicago’s Internet of Things Council – Chicago Tribune. (link)

Image above: Interior of Leap Bus, via Wired.

NYC Now #1 Cycling City in US

At a press conference today alongside the new Lafayette Street protected bike lane, NYC Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg and Bicycling Magazine’s Bill Strickland announced that New York City is now the top city for biking in the United States. 

From the DOT press release:

“New Yorkers love to cycle and they bring an energy and passion that only this city can produce. I want to thank the past leadership at DOT and our current bike lane innovators who helped make New York the best biking city in the U.S.” – DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg

See photos of the event below, with the NYU Rudin Center’s Puck Building office in the background. Photos by Nolan Levenson.

Recap and Photos: Citi Bike Data Showcase

Last night’s Citi Bike Data Showcase brought a full, fun crowd to talk about visualizations, apps and nuances of Citi Bike use and analysis. Hosted by the Rudin Center and emceed by Noel Hidalgo of BetaNYC, the event featured several brief talks:

  • Dani Simons, Director of Marketing at NYC Bike Share, showed how the organization uses its data to manage bike fleets and where the system expansion may occur going forward.
  • Jeff Ferzoco (linepointpath) and Alex Chohlas-Wood (NYU CUSP) discussed their upcoming project of calculating bike salmoning.
  • Aaron Fraint (Hunter College) showed his favorite coding tools for analysis and visualization, including some processes that can take three days to complete.  (link)
  • Ben Wellington (I Quant NY/Pratt) demonstrated the process of map creation using Citi Bike and NYC data with free coding tools.
  • Sarah Kaufman (NYU Rudin Center) discussed gender, Citi Bike, and the modern freedoms reflective of women’s discovery of pantaloons.
  • Amy Wu and Luke Stern (SVA) redesigning Citi Bike’s checkout and kiosk process

Frank Hebbert (Open Plans) closed out the event by showcasing his new #bikestoday tool, which automatically counts bikes riding past.

See event photos below (by Jeff Ferzoco).

Citi Bike and Gender

By Sarah Kaufman; Map by Jeff Ferzoco

As the city enters a long-awaited spring and the bikes emerge, so too might a pattern: according to Citi Bike’s public data, men are riding more – far more – than women, averaging three times more rides. Of subscriber-based rides in July through December 2013, men took 76.3% of all trips, and women 23.7%. What is the cause of this disparity, and how can it be resolved?

Women typically attribute reduced cycling numbers to safety among car traffic, and considering Citi Bike’s distribution across some of the most congested parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn, lower female participation makes sense. Further analysis of the gender divide by bike share station shows that bike stations in Manhattan are predominantly used by men, while Brooklyn stations are more proportionately popular among women. Of the top ten stations for each gender, women preferred the Brooklyn residential neighborhoods of Fort Greene and Clinton Hill, while men were overwhelmingly represented in bustling midtown Manhattan. Women also chose stations in areas with fewer lanes of traffic, more limited truck traffic, fewer collision-based cyclist injuries in recent memory, and in some cases, fast access to bridge entrances; men most often chose stations with more traffic, some truck traffic, some collision-based cyclist injuries, and, typically, connectivity to major transit hubs.

See the map below to explore these stations:

MapBaseforSketchTNv2 (2)

The station with the highest proportion of women, only 37.9%, is Station 266, the East Village’s 8th Street and Avenue D location. Although there is no dedicated bike lane on that block, the area has limited transit access, quieter traffic, and easy access to the tranquil East River waterfront and bridges.

The numbers of women bikers are universally important, since they teach us which locations are safe (and perceived to be). Station 266’s relative diversity can teach us a few things about biking in New York City: When it is (and feels) safe, people will bike as a last-mile transit solution, a connector to parks and recreation, and as a lifeline for improved job access from a distant location (ask an Avenue D resident if they would consider working in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, a treacherous commute by transit; biking would essentially halve the travel time).

Women have a long favorable history with biking. In the 1890s, women discovered the bicycle as the best means of personal mobility, providing exercise, freedom from reliance on men for transportation, and reform of requirements for wearing unwieldy undergarments. According to suffragist Susan B. Anthony, biking had “done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” (source)

In 2014, a safe, active travel mode that complements transit is important for all New Yorkers, and as the system expands farther into the city’s residential reaches of Brooklyn, Queens and uptown Manhattan, we will likely see a more balanced use of the system. By comparison, Washington, DC’s Capital Bikeshare system extends into multiple lower-traffic residential areas like Clinton Hill, and the subscriber rate is a more balanced 55% male, 45% female. (source)

Removing the barriers to cycling will universalize biking’s appeal, and bike share will become a truly mature transportation mode integrated into NYC’s fabric of mobility.

Data note: Station proportions were calculated by number of trip starts by subscribers, the only users for whom gender data is available.

P.S. Enjoy data uses like the one here? Be sure to join us for the Citi Bike data showcase night on May 28.