Category Archives: event

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New Program: Emerging Leaders in Transportation

Announcing the NYU Rudin Center’s new fellowship for Emerging Leaders in Transportation.

In this fellowship program, participants will learn from top transportation and management professionals to enhance leadership skills and policy work to bring innovative ideas into practice. During three half-day sessions, emerging leaders will build long-term leadership goals and will focus on developing innovative projects and ideas within an organization.

Applications due August 15, 2014. APPLY HERE: http://wagner.nyu.edu/rudincenter/fellowship_application/

Details:

  • The program is open to transportation professionals with up to 10 years of experience.
  • The program will be held on three half-days: October 10, 17 and 24.
  • There is no cost for participating in the program.
  • We are unable to subsidize travel or lodging for participants.

Further questions? Email rudin.center@nyu.edu.

This program is supported by a grant from the University Transportation Research Center.

Big Ideas for Transportation - 7/8/2014

Big Ideas for Transportation: Recap and Photos

Last night’s panel on Big Ideas for Transportation, co-hosted by the Rudin Center, Downtown Alliance and Control Group, featured fantastic talks against the scenic background of South Street Seaport.

The speaker lineup:

Introductions:

Panelists:

  • Chris Whong, Socrata, explored the notion of hardware-based taxi hailing devices, bringing the internet of things to the urban street corner.
  • Florent Pyre, Placemeter, discussed Placemeter Speedbuster, a crowdsourcing initiative that allows citizens to let city agenciesidentify traffic hotspots that warrant additional stop signs, speed bumps, or traffic patrols by placing a small sensor in their windows and leveraging computer vision.
  • Joe Dack, NYC DOT, discussed freight activity and give an overview of solutions that organizations can adopt to reduce the impact of freight activity in the urban area.
  • Eric Goldwyn, Columbia University School of Architecture, Preservation & Planning, made the case for expanded ferry service between Lower Manhattan, Northern Brooklyn, and Western Queens.
  • Justin Schultz, MTA Capital Construction, discussed the changing landscape in Lower Manhattan and transit’s role in the creation ofa truly 24/7 community.
  • Neysa Pranger (Moderator), Control Group

Some photos of the event:

Thanks to event co-organizers Daria Siegel and Stacey Levine, and to Jeff Ferzoco for photography.

Members of the Google PDF 2014 Fellowship and Google Staff

Personal Democracy and Transportation

By Sarah Kaufman

Last week I attended the Personal Democracy Forum, an annual two-day symposium on the intersection of technology and politics, and often the source of much rabble-rousing in online rights. This year’s theme was “Save the Internet / The Internet Saves,” referring to the massive data-gathering of online records by government contrasted with the frequent positive interactions and movements only made possible by the internet’s connectivity.

I had the pleasure of participating in the conference as one of fifteen Google PDF Fellows who, like me, believe in the power of the internet and open data to make our cities and countries better places to live, work and get around. That Microsoft and Google were major sponsors of a conference on individualized web rights speaks volumes about the current push-pull relationship between simultaneous calls for personal privacy and government transparency.

That push-pull exists widely in transportation as well: We do not want our movements tracked, but we want Uber cars on demand. We want real-time information about how many people are in a station, but don’t want our own MetroCard swipes made public. We want traffic data, but don’t want our phones constantly being pinged for motion detection.

When it comes to transportation, we are often being tracked more than it seems, and up to this point, it has worked out to our benefit. Significant sets of transportation data, including procurement practices and taxi trips, should still be opened quickly and in digestible formats to take us to the next level of smart mobility.

However, privatized modes constitute a growing sector of transportation, including Uber, ZipCar and corporate shuttle buses. None of those modes are legally required to disclose data, but imagine if they did: perhaps cities would be more amenable to the working e-hail model, residents of congested cities could be incentivized to car-share rather than own, and road use fees could be charged appropriately to private buses to help pay for public ones. In a disaster, such as after a storm that knocks out a city’s subway system, data on all of these modes would help mobilize the city to ensure that residents can get to home, work and safe spaces.

It’s time to embrace these private transportation providers as important transportation networks while also requiring them to provide open data, for the greater good of urban mobility.

Members of the Google PDF 2014 Fellowship and Google Staff
Members of the Google PDF 2014 Fellowship and Google Staff (photo courtesy of Google)
Dani Simons (Citi Bike) presenting at the Citi Bike Data Showcase on May 28, 2014

Recap and Photos: Citi Bike Data Showcase

Last night’s Citi Bike Data Showcase brought a full, fun crowd to talk about visualizations, apps and nuances of Citi Bike use and analysis. Hosted by the Rudin Center and emceed by Noel Hidalgo of BetaNYC, the event featured several brief talks:

  • Dani Simons, Director of Marketing at NYC Bike Share, showed how the organization uses its data to manage bike fleets and where the system expansion may occur going forward.
  • Jeff Ferzoco (linepointpath) and Alex Chohlas-Wood (NYU CUSP) discussed their upcoming project of calculating bike salmoning.
  • Aaron Fraint (Hunter College) showed his favorite coding tools for analysis and visualization, including some processes that can take three days to complete.  (link)
  • Ben Wellington (I Quant NY/Pratt) demonstrated the process of map creation using Citi Bike and NYC data with free coding tools.
  • Sarah Kaufman (NYU Rudin Center) discussed gender, Citi Bike, and the modern freedoms reflective of women’s discovery of pantaloons.
  • Amy Wu and Luke Stern (SVA) redesigning Citi Bike’s checkout and kiosk process

Frank Hebbert (Open Plans) closed out the event by showcasing his new #bikestoday tool, which automatically counts bikes riding past.

See event photos below (by Jeff Ferzoco).

Sarah Kaufman moderated Short Talks, Big Ideas - April 7, 2014

Short Talks, Big Ideas: Photos and Recap

Monday night’s Short Talks, Big Ideas event showcased the newest innovations in transportation projects and ideas. Thanks to the excellent speakers and large crowd!

See the photos below and visit the tweetstream for discussion.

Photos by Jeff Ferzoco

Polly Trottenberg, NYC DOT Commissioner, at the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation breakfast at The Modern, March 13, 2014

Excellence in Transportation Breakfast

The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation hosted the Excellence in Transportation Breakfast on March 13, 2013, at The Modern. Tom Prendergast, MTA Chairman and CEO and Polly Trottenberg, NYC DOT Commissioner, delivered keynote addresses.

Noel Hidalgo presents at Short Talks, Big Ideas, Fall 2013

New Event: Short Talks, Big Ideas

Join the NYU Rudin Center on Monday, April 7th at 6:30pm to learn about new projects and thinking on the frontiers of transportation. Speakers will deliver lightning presentations about their work and ideas, followed by networking, refreshments. We guarantee the audience will learn something new.

 

Speakers confirmed for this fifth edition of the event include:

Malinda Foy, MTA: The Access-A-Ride MetroCard
Lily Gordon-Koven, NYU Rudin Center: Citi Bike Trends
Nina Harvey, ARUP: Tech-Enhanced Urban Experiences
Stacey Hodge, NYC DOT: NYC Freight Mobility
Jacqueline Klopp, Columbia University: Open Transit Data for Nairobi
Stewart Mader, Subway NY NJ, Putting PATH on the Map
Jen Petersen, Revolution Rickshaws, Put Your [   ] on a Trike
Kate Rube, Project for Public Spaces: Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper – and Healthier
Andrew Salzberg, Uber: Uber in New York
Dani Simons, Citi Bike: Mainstreaming Biking
Moderated by Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

Join the discussion on Twitter at #BigIdeas14

This event is co-sponsored by the University Transportation Research Center.