Category Archives: leaders

Citi Bike Usage and the Future of the Program

NYU’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management released a study today entitledCiti Bike, What Current Use and Activity Suggests for the Future of the Program,” which takes stock of the system’s strengths and areas for growth as policymakers determine the City’s role in bringing Citi Bike to all five boroughs.

Key findings include:

  • Citi Bike is most heavily used in Manhattan- 83% of September trips started & ended there, with concentration around major transportation networks. If the system expands to the outer boroughs ridership is expected to be lower, speaking to the need for additional private or public financing— but will likely still primarily transport New Yorkers to commercial centers and other forms of transportation like buses and subways.
  • The majority of Citi Bike trips are short in both time and distance; 98% lasted under 45 minutes and 48% lasted under ten minutes— highlighting the importance of station density to match how people are using the system.
  • Only 112 stations (18%) are located in Zip Codes that have median household incomes of less than $50,000—reinforcing the importance of improving bike equity and access throughout the system.

The paper, published by Sarah M. Kaufman and Jenny O’Connell, is the result of an open forum on the status of Citi Bike hosted at the Rudin Center in November of 2016.  Expert speakers included Council Member Ydanis Rodriguez, Chair of the Transportation Committee; Tracey Capers (Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation/BSRC); Elena Conte (Pratt Center for Community Development); and Paul Steely White (Transportation Alternatives).  NYU Rudin Center for Transportation Director Mitchell L. Moss moderated.

The panelists agreed that Citi Bike provided a valuable transportation service, and alternative funding methods would be necessary to support expansion to a five-borough Citi Bike network.

Download the report here [pdf].

A Scooter Share Primer

In the NYU Rudin Center’s August 2016 report on the “L Train Closure and Mitigation,” we suggested creative measures, including gondolas and scooter shares, to diversify commute and travel options. Today, we set out to explore the scooter share market around the world.
So, what is a scooter share?
Think bike share, but with electric scooters.
We looked at 10 scooter shares around the globe to see how they operated, including Cityscoot (Paris, France), Coup (Berlin, Germany), eBike (Chiayi, Taiwan), Enjoy (Milan, Italy), LoopShare (Vancouver, Canada), Scoot (San Francisco, US), Scooty (Brussels, Belgium), WeMo (Taipei, Taiwan), Yugo (Barcelona, Spain) and 2Hire (Rome, Italy).


How does it work?
For starters, all but one of the scooter shares (eBike in Chiayi, Taiwan) are privately operated. Some require a membership or registration fee (monthly, annual or one time) in addition to base charges per ride, but many are free to join. With the exception of Vancouver’s LoopShare, every system charges on a minute basis; LoopShare charges per kilometer traveled. Similar to bike share systems, most of the scooter shares we observed charge a flat rate for a set trip time, ranging from 10 to 30 minutes, and tack on a per-minute charge once the trip has surpassed that limit. Unlike bike shares, however, many of the scooter shares allow you to park anywhere within a zone. Users then pick up a scooter where it’s been parked (sometimes a designated charging spot). Because most scooter sharing programs have rolled out in the last year, most cities currently only have pilot zones (usually in the central business district), with the aim of expanding in the near future. Users tap into the network by locating and reserving scooters in a proprietary app.

Graphic of the Yugo System
Graphic of the Yugo System

What is the scooter riding experience?
Nearly all of the scooter shares employ electric scooters though each scooter seems as unique as the city its found in. Perhaps the most eye-catching, is the Taiwanese-developed Gogoro scooter, which hit the market only last year in Taiwan and is currently being utilized in both Taipei WeMo and Berlin Coup scooter sharing systems. The Gogoro features a “smart” mode, that tunes the scooter’s performance to optimize battery life. Paris’s Cityscoot is employing the German-based Govec scooter, featuring a fold-out wind and waterproof blanket to cover the rider’s legs on cold or rainy days. Barcelona’s Yugo scooter fleet is nearly indistinguishable from a vintage Vespa, save for it’s silent, emission-free electric motor. San Francisco’s Scoot launched with the a Govec scooter similar to Cityscoot in Paris, but is now transitioning to a lighter weight option that tops out around 30 miles per hour. Vancouver’s Loop scooters are perhaps the least traditional scooter of the bunch, with a very light-weight, minimal design and topping out at a speed of 25 miles per hour. The only non-electric scooters are from Milan’s Enjoy fleet of robust, three-wheeled Piaggio scooters, which are operated in tandem with a car-sharing service by Italian gas company Eni.

gogoro-family-shot1
Gogoro Scooter pictured with Battery Station

How are the scooters and network powered?
Because most of the scooters used in these programs are electric and require recharging, it can be challenging to keep them juiced-up. At least two of the ten scooter systems incentive riders to return the scooter to a charging dock; for instance, Cityscoot in Paris offers a two euro credit for docked scooters. Taipei’s WeMo system relies on a battery exchange system; when the scooters are running low on power, the batteries can easily be swapped by the rider for a fully charged one using one of the many battery charging kiosks around the city.  Only the publicly operated eBike system in Chiayi and Rome’s 2Hire for university students have assigned parking docks.

Opportunities for Future Study
Through this exploration of scooter shares, we’ve identified additional questions and opportunities for future study. These topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Where do scooter shares currently exist? Given that only one of the scooter shares, Scoot SF, was located in the United States, we wanted to know more about the makeup of cities with scooter shares. Do they share commonalities in terms of population density and mode share split?
  • What modes of transit do scooter shares naturally complement? How do other systems integrate with transit?
  • What are the challenges inherent to a scooter share?
  • What are the operational differences between the scooters currently used by sharing systems? Which systems require drivers’ licenses or motorcycle licenses?

Program Recap: Emerging Leaders in Transportation 2016

Last week, the NYU Rudin Center concluded its second Emerging Leaders in Transportation program. This year’s program consisted of two mornings of seminars with industry leaders, a behind-the-scenes tour of local transportation facilities and a networking reception with program alumni.

Program participants explored innovation and leadership within the context of their careers and engaged in discussion about how to build essential leadership skills, manage office politics, promote their ideas, and lead change within their respective companies. This year’s themes included data analysis, autonomous vehicles, congestion management, sustainability and active transport.

This year’s speakers included:

With a program keynote speech delivered by

The group visited the NYC Transit Rail Control Center for an inside perspective on operations and challenges.

The 2016 Emerging Leaders in Transportation program was a major success. Thanks to the many transportation professionals who took the time to participate as speakers and to this year’s fellows, who brought their best ideas and enthusiasm.

Emerging Leaders in Transportation was directed and moderated by Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center Assistant Director, and supported by the University Transportation Research Center.

Event: The Future of Citi Bike: Assuring Access to Low-Income Communities

DATE: November 17, 2016
TIME: 08:45am – 10:00am
LOCATION: Puck Building – The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl., 295 Lafayette Street, New York; NY 10012-9604

 

A panel discussion with:

Tracey Capers
Executive Vice President, Programs/Organizational Development, Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Elena Conte
Director of Policy, Pratt Center for Community Development

Councilmember Ydanis Rodriguez
Chair – Committee on Transportation, New York City Council

Paul Steely White
Executive Director, Transportation Alternatives

Moderated by:

Mitchell L. Moss
Henry Hart Rice Professor of Urban Policy and Planning and Director of the Rudin Center for Transportation, NYU Wagner School

Event: Cities, Data, And Mobility: The NYC Experience

Date: 11/15/2016
Time: 8:45am – 10:00am
Location: The Puck Building, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Fl., 295 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10012-9604
RSVPhttps://wagner.nyu.edu/events/rudin-11-15-2016

The  growth of NYC’s for-hire vehicle market means that the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission is gathering unprecedented amounts of trip data, yielding  a far more comprehensive view of how New Yorkers travel. The TLC uses this data to enforce consumer protections and safety requirements and to gain insight into emerging transportation models, accessibility and driver income. How can the public and private sectors use this data to inform policymaking?

Join us for a lively discussion.

Opening remarks: Meera Joshi, Commissioner and Chair, New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission

Panelists:
Gale Brewer, Manhattan Borough President
Cordell Schachter, Chief Technology Officer, New York City Department of Transportation
Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer, City of New York
Anthony Townsend, Founder, Bits and Atoms

Moderated by Mitchell L. Moss, Director, NYU Rudin Center

RSVP here.

Photo: Michael Greenberg

Reimagining Southwest Brooklyn

The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation hosted Reimagining Southwest Brooklyn last week. Chris Ward of global engineering firm AECOM presented a redevelopment plan that would add thousands of residential units to the Brooklyn waterfront and a subway connection to lower Manhattan.

Read the Southwest Brooklyn study here.

APPLY NOW: EMERGING LEADERS IN TRANSPORTATION FELLOWSHIP

The application period has closed. Thank you for your interest. We will contact applicants in October.

The Emerging Leaders in Transportation fellowship program aims to enhance the toolkit of early-career employees to make transportation more efficient, effective and people-oriented.

In this competitive fellowship program, participants will learn from top transportation and management professionals to enhance leadership skills, communication techniques and policy work to bring innovative ideas into practice.

The 2016 program will take place on December 1 and 2 at the NYU Rudin Center, 295 Lafayette Street, NY, NY. The agenda includes:

December 1:

  • A half-day leadership session, where emerging leaders will collaborate on long-term leadership goals
  • A behind-the-scenes visit to a major transportation facility for hands-on learning about industry goals and challenges
  • A networking reception with 2014 and 2015 Emerging Leaders cohorts

December 2:

  • A half-day leadership session focused on developing innovative projects and ideas within an organization
  • Lunchtime networking opportunities 

Discussion topics will include: leadership, innovation, communications, building support for innovation, and practical applications. Sessions will include talks from and with esteemed professionals and group discussions and exercises. Participants will develop plans to introduce innovative solutions or concepts within their workplaces.

View a recap of last year’s fellowship program here.

Apply using the form below or by clicking here.

Application Timeline:

  • August 3: Application period opens
  • September 15: Applications due
  • October 13: Fellowship class selection announcement
  • December 1-2: Fellowship program
Details:
  • The Emerging Fellows program is open to transportation professionals with up to 10 years of experience.
  • There is no cost for participating in the program.
  • Applicants are welcome from any location; however, we are unable to subsidize travel or lodging for participants.
  • No AICP or other continuing education credit is available for this program.
  • Previous applicants are welcome to re-apply. Past participants are ineligible.

If you have questions about this program, please email rudin.center@nyu.edu.

This program is supported by a grant from the University Transportation Research Center.

The application period has closed. Thank you for your interest. We will contact applicants in October.

Op-Ed: Rebuild Penn Station without uprooting the Garden

Mitchell L. Moss, NYU Rudin Center Director, and Hugh O’Neill, founder and president of Appleseed, wrote an op-ed in today’s Crain’s New York, “Forget romantic fantasies—rebuild Penn Station without uprooting the Garden.” (link)

Here’s an excerpt:

There are well-meaning groups who believe we should tear down the current structure, move Madison Square Garden, and start over. Simply put, this is too expensive and disruptive an option for achieving most of the same goals by modernizing the existing facility at far lower cost and with far less disruption.

Read the full piece here; Read the related report, “Penn Station: Time to Get Moving,” here.

Recent events at the NYU Rudin Center