Category Archives: pedestrians

Proximity To Subway

Report: Citi Bike Takes New York

Why does Citi Bike work? New York’s densely populated center already encourages residents, workers, and tourists to walk or take transit to get around the city. New York City, famed for its density and walkability, lends itself well to a tightly knit web of bike share stations. There are almost 20 stations per square mile within its service area, and almost 3/4 of its stations are within walking distance of a subway entrance.

Check out the report here.  Download here.

Here’s an example of what you’ll see in the report:

Distance from Subway Entrance
Citi Bike Station Distance from Subway Entrance
Noel Hidalgo presents at Short Talks, Big Ideas, Fall 2013

New Event: Short Talks, Big Ideas

Join the NYU Rudin Center on Monday, April 7th at 6:30pm to learn about new projects and thinking on the frontiers of transportation. Speakers will deliver lightning presentations about their work and ideas, followed by networking, refreshments. We guarantee the audience will learn something new.

 

Speakers confirmed for this fifth edition of the event include:

Malinda Foy, MTA: The Access-A-Ride MetroCard
Lily Gordon-Koven, NYU Rudin Center: Citi Bike Trends
Nina Harvey, ARUP: Tech-Enhanced Urban Experiences
Stacey Hodge, NYC DOT: NYC Freight Mobility
Jacqueline Klopp, Columbia University: Open Transit Data for Nairobi
Stewart Mader, Subway NY NJ, Putting PATH on the Map
Jen Petersen, Revolution Rickshaws, Put Your [   ] on a Trike
Kate Rube, Project for Public Spaces: Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper – and Healthier
Andrew Salzberg, Uber: Uber in New York
Dani Simons, Citi Bike: Mainstreaming Biking
Moderated by Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

Join the discussion on Twitter at #BigIdeas14

This event is co-sponsored by the University Transportation Research Center.

NYC vs. DC: Pedestrian Showdown

Do pedestrians have more time to cross the street in DC than in NYC? It depends. Both cities have rapidly implemented “countdown” pedestrian signals to give pedestrians a better estimate of how much time they have to cross. This is particularly useful for those who may walk a bit slower than the “average” pedestrian, such as the elderly and disabled.

Countdown Pedestrian Signals in DC display the full cycle length

Countdown Pedestrian Signals in DC display the full cycle length. Source: Eric Fischer, Creative Commons / Flickr

At first glance, it may seem like pedestrians have longer to cross in DC, but here’s the secret: in the District, pedestrians are given the countdown of the full cycle length, whereas NYC pedestrians are only given the countdown for time just before the “don’t walk” phase (the blinking red light or the “clearance phase”).

Countdown Pedestrian Signals in NYC follow the MUTCD and only display "clearance times."

Countdown Pedestrian Signals in NYC follow the MUTCD and only display “clearance times.” Source: Eric Fischer, Creative Commons/Flickr

Why does this difference exist? According to the signal bible, the Manual on Uniform Control Devices (MUTCD) published by the Federal Highway Administration, pedestrian signals should look like the ones in NYC. But wouldn’t you want to know how much time you have total? Not just the “clearance time”?

Are government officials in DC a bunch of rule breakers? Actually, DC was a trial city for implementation of full countdown clocks, but the results of this “test” have yet to be released.

In general, the length of signals for pedestrians depends on volumes of people and traffic on the street. DC usually uses 100-second signal cycles (for all intersection movements) during peak hours, and 80-second signal cycles on nights and weekends. NYC varies much more, with cycle lengths between 45 and 120 seconds.

Sources: Sam Zimbabwe and George Branyan, DDOT; NYCDOT website