Category Archives: transit

Stacey Hodge proposes off-hour deliveries at Short Talks, Big Ideas - April 7, 2014

New event: Short Talks, Big Ideas

Join us at the sixth edition of Short Talks, Big Ideas on September 23rd.

RSVP here - http://wagner.nyu.edu/events/rudin-09-23-2014

Sponsored by the Rudin Center and by the University Transportation Research Center

Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Time: 6:30pm – 9:30pm
Location:  295 Lafayette Street, 2nd Floor, NYC
                 The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue


Join the NYU Rudin Center to learn about the frontiers of transportation in this sixth event of the Short Talks, Big Ideas series.
Speakers will deliver lightning presentations about their work and ideas, followed by networking and refreshments. We guarantee the audience will learn something new.

Confirmed Speakers:
John Biggs, TechCrunch – “Mytro”
Arlene Ducao, MindRider – Brain wave-tracking bike helmets
Richard Dunks, NYU CUSP – Water Street Corridorscope
Malinda Foy, MTA Bridges and Tunnels
Neysa Pranger, Control Group – Beacon technology for transit
Paul Salama, WXY Architecture + Urban Design – Green loading zones
Jose Soegaard, Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance – Development of the NY/NJ waterfront

Moderator:
Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

Follow @NYURudin for more speaker announcements, and join the discussion on Twitter at #BigIdeas14

 

flickr // momentcaptured1

Map: Subway Stations with Wireless Service

Where can you use your cell phone underground? Here’s a map to show you which 37 subway stations are wired for access. According to MTA and Transit Wireless, the consortium responsible for building out the access, the 241 remaining underground stations will come online  within four years.


// Map by NYU Rudin Center intern Andrew Poeppel – data from Transit Wireless

Top image: flickr // momentcaptured1

Yelp Reviews of the Busiest Subway Stations

Did you know people post Yelp reviews of subway stations? Here’s a map of NYC’s busiest subway stations, created by our summer intern Andrew Poeppel. Click on the stations (numbered by busiest) to see their Yelp rating, reviews and more.

You can find Andrew on Twitter: @AndrewPoeppel.

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Citi Bike and “Reactionary Biking”

We at the NYU Rudin Center got an early look at Citi Bike’s new trip data and found exciting snippets, such as where it’s clear that New Yorkers hopped off delayed subways and onto bikes, transferred from ferries, or attended events at Barclays Center. (Check out our video of 48 hours in the life of Citi Bike, now live on the NYTimes website.)

 In fact, for the month of September, there is evidence of “reactionary biking,” in which subway riders encountering delays likely switched modes to bike share for that trip. The chart below demonstrates a moderate correlation between subway delays and Citi Bike usage throughout September: when delays increase, so does bike share ridership.

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Reactionary biking is indicated during particular instances: for example, on September 17th at 7:45 a.m., the MTA sent an alert that the 2/3 train was delayed at Wall Street, in the heart of Citi Bike’s stations. In the half hour surrounding this alert, seventeen rides were recorded along the 2/3 route within four stops of the Wall Street Station; they were not repeated at the same time the following day. The increased rides on days heavy with delays, coupled with September’s pleasant weather (with temperatures ranging from 59 to 76 on average), lead to the conclusion that New Yorkers are avoiding or escaping transit delays by taking to bike share. As Citi Bike expands across New York City, it will provide a more comprehensive alternative to delayed transit.

Citi Bike has become an important mode in New York’s diverse transportation landscape, both as a method of active transport and an essential connection to the transit network; we are eager to analyze this data to understand its role in New York-area mobility.

 

Data notes:

  • The chart accounts for unplanned service changes only; it does not include planned weeknight and weekend service diversions (and their occasional cancelations) relating to construction work.
  •  Dates recorded are for bike trip starts only; trips ending on subsequent days are recorded on the days on which the trips started.
Proximity To Subway

Report: Citi Bike Takes New York

Why does Citi Bike work? New York’s densely populated center already encourages residents, workers, and tourists to walk or take transit to get around the city. New York City, famed for its density and walkability, lends itself well to a tightly knit web of bike share stations. There are almost 20 stations per square mile within its service area, and almost 3/4 of its stations are within walking distance of a subway entrance.

Check out the report here.  Download here.

Here’s an example of what you’ll see in the report:

Distance from Subway Entrance
Citi Bike Station Distance from Subway Entrance
Noel Hidalgo presents at Short Talks, Big Ideas, Fall 2013

New Event: Short Talks, Big Ideas

Join the NYU Rudin Center on Monday, April 7th at 6:30pm to learn about new projects and thinking on the frontiers of transportation. Speakers will deliver lightning presentations about their work and ideas, followed by networking, refreshments. We guarantee the audience will learn something new.

 

Speakers confirmed for this fifth edition of the event include:

Malinda Foy, MTA: The Access-A-Ride MetroCard
Lily Gordon-Koven, NYU Rudin Center: Citi Bike Trends
Nina Harvey, ARUP: Tech-Enhanced Urban Experiences
Stacey Hodge, NYC DOT: NYC Freight Mobility
Jacqueline Klopp, Columbia University: Open Transit Data for Nairobi
Stewart Mader, Subway NY NJ, Putting PATH on the Map
Jen Petersen, Revolution Rickshaws, Put Your [   ] on a Trike
Kate Rube, Project for Public Spaces: Lighter, Quicker, Cheaper – and Healthier
Andrew Salzberg, Uber: Uber in New York
Dani Simons, Citi Bike: Mainstreaming Biking
Moderated by Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

Join the discussion on Twitter at #BigIdeas14

This event is co-sponsored by the University Transportation Research Center.

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New Work: Co-Monitoring for Transit

A new report and accompanying website have just been posted, in which author Sarah Kaufman aims to bridge the communications gap between transit agencies and their riders.

Check out the advocacy site for open transit monitoring, or go straight to the report. As always, share your comments with us here or on social media.