Category Archives: Uncategorized

New Report: Intelligent Paratransit

Our new report, Intelligent Paratransit, is available for download here.

Executive Summary

As Americans aged 65 or older increase from fifteen to twenty percent of the population by 2030, cities across the United States will face a transportation crisis. Urban residents who are physically unable to use public transportation, including the disabled and mobility-impaired elderly, are offered paratransit services. These paratransit systems, as required by an unfunded 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act mandate, are enormous, and growing annually in new applications and budget requirements.

Paratransit demand is growing nationwide and costs continually increase (now $5.2 billion nationwide); the user experience is often reported as poor. To address efficiency and user experience, this report assesses the state of paratransit, analyzes innovative solutions in three cities and recommends potential technological solutions. The Intelligent Paratransit Technological Upgrade Framework includes improvements in the areas of Onboarding, Reservations, Dispatch & Routing and User Experience. Key technological recommendations include:

  • Ride reservations should be available through multiple channels: phone, apps, SMS messaging, physical infrastructure on the street and wearable technology for riders.
  • Paratransit agencies must collaborate with taxis and app-based car services, including Uber, Lyft, Via and SilverRide, to integrate efficient services.
  • Services connecting riders to transit should feature real-time, in-vehicle data integration with transit services to optimize accessibility of trips.
  • As cities grow in language diversity, paratransit vehicles should feature on-board translation apps and call-in numbers to better service all riders.

By applying new technological systems to a 26 year-old mandate, paratransit services can be made more efficient and provide a better customer experience. In New York City, these upgrades could save the agency up to $133 million per year. Improving mobility solutions for the elderly and disabled is possible, necessary and urgent.

Reimagining Southwest Brooklyn

The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation hosted Reimagining Southwest Brooklyn last week. Chris Ward of global engineering firm AECOM presented a redevelopment plan that would add thousands of residential units to the Brooklyn waterfront and a subway connection to lower Manhattan.

Read the Southwest Brooklyn study here.

NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission Hackathon

Help NYC TLC provide more public data – identify potential privacy risks in public taxi datasets!

The TLC has been a pioneer in sharing big data since 2010. With over 21,000 licensed vehicles equipped to capture GPS-enabled trip records. TLC’s trip data are valuable for policy makers, scholars, businesses and urban planners. Earlier data releases included anonymized vehicle and driver identifiers, but in 2014 they were de-anonymized and published. In response, we stopped releasing these identifiers altogether, which limits the data’s usefulness.  TLC would like you help to re-release this information in the most efficient manner possible.

Read contest rules and more information at the hackathon website.

L Train Closure: CityLab Coverage

The NYU Rudin Center’s report “L Train Closure and Mitigation,” was covered in CityLab last week.

“MTA and city leaders had better get a game plan in place, according to the report’s authors. They suggest some obvious steps, such as bolstering subway service on other lines, ramping up the frequency of ferry connections, and adding high-speed bus service over the Williamsburg Bridge during peak hours. Increasing car-share options and creating partnerships with the likes of Uber and Lyft should also be on the table.

And, as the authors point out, the L train closure might also be an opportunity to pursue some outside-the-box transit improvements, like a scooter share system modeled after San Francisco’s and even a high-speed gondola.”

Read the full article here.

L Train Closure and Mitigation

The L train tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn will close fully to trains for 18 months in 2019 to repair extensive damage from Superstorm Sandy.  The L has become synonymous with the Brooklyn brand; ridership at Brooklyn’s Bedford Avenue station has increased more than thirty percent since 2010.

The NYU Rudin Center addresses the effects of this closure in our newest report, “L Train Closure and Mitigation,” written by Mitchell L. Moss, Sarah M. Kaufman, Jorge Hernandez and Sam Levy.

This report analyzes how the L train’s surrounding Brooklyn communities will absorb the economic impact of this tunnel closure: jobs, commutes dining and nightlife will be affected, and recommends mitigation measures.

Download the report [pdf]

Read the Wall Street Journal coverage.

How NYC Won the Olympics

New York City’s bid to host the 2012 Olympics resulted in a spate of new development, despite the selection of London as the host city. The NYU Rudin Center report, “How New York City Won the Olympics,” describes how the 2012 plan shaped development and transformed major areas of New York City.

Mitchell L. Moss, NYU Rudin Center Director and author of the report, commented to DNA Info: “New York got everything that’s desirable out of the Olympics without any of the burdens” in an article this week: How NYC’s Failed 2012 Olympic Bid Shaped the City We Live in Today.

Job Access report featured in NY Times

The NYU Rudin Center’s report, “Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods” was featured in The New York Times this week. The article applied lessons learned from New Yorkers living in transit deserts to those dreading the L train’s impending closure.

Sarah M. Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center assistant director, commented in the article: “‘It is a perpetuating cycle because rents are closely correlated to transit access’ … adding that people with long commutes often face hardships like higher child care costs because they get home later.”

APPLY NOW: EMERGING LEADERS IN TRANSPORTATION FELLOWSHIP

The application period has closed. Thank you for your interest. We will contact applicants in October.

The Emerging Leaders in Transportation fellowship program aims to enhance the toolkit of early-career employees to make transportation more efficient, effective and people-oriented.

In this competitive fellowship program, participants will learn from top transportation and management professionals to enhance leadership skills, communication techniques and policy work to bring innovative ideas into practice.

The 2016 program will take place on December 1 and 2 at the NYU Rudin Center, 295 Lafayette Street, NY, NY. The agenda includes:

December 1:

  • A half-day leadership session, where emerging leaders will collaborate on long-term leadership goals
  • A behind-the-scenes visit to a major transportation facility for hands-on learning about industry goals and challenges
  • A networking reception with 2014 and 2015 Emerging Leaders cohorts

December 2:

  • A half-day leadership session focused on developing innovative projects and ideas within an organization
  • Lunchtime networking opportunities 

Discussion topics will include: leadership, innovation, communications, building support for innovation, and practical applications. Sessions will include talks from and with esteemed professionals and group discussions and exercises. Participants will develop plans to introduce innovative solutions or concepts within their workplaces.

View a recap of last year’s fellowship program here.

Apply using the form below or by clicking here.

Application Timeline:

  • August 3: Application period opens
  • September 15: Applications due
  • October 13: Fellowship class selection announcement
  • December 1-2: Fellowship program
Details:
  • The Emerging Fellows program is open to transportation professionals with up to 10 years of experience.
  • There is no cost for participating in the program.
  • Applicants are welcome from any location; however, we are unable to subsidize travel or lodging for participants.
  • No AICP or other continuing education credit is available for this program.
  • Previous applicants are welcome to re-apply. Past participants are ineligible.

If you have questions about this program, please email rudin.center@nyu.edu.

This program is supported by a grant from the University Transportation Research Center.

The application period has closed. Thank you for your interest. We will contact applicants in October.