Category Archives: urban planning

Subway Manners

 It has become a trend in many major Metropolitan cities to make riders aware of proper subway etiquette.  Below are several Subway Etiquette advertisement posters to inform  from New York City, Philadelphia, Boston, San Francisco, Chicago and Tokyo.  The first two ads were part of an etiquette campaign in the early 1900s by the New York Board of Transportation.

New York
New York
New York
New York

These ads focus mainly on ‘manspeading’ and keeping your belongings to yourself.  It is interesting to compare how each city addressed this campaign.  Philadelphia and Chicago took a more aggressive and straight to the point approach.   Philadelphia titled it’s ads “Dude It’s Rude”.

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia

 

Chicago was quite frank with their messages towards riders who speak loudly or play loud music while on the train.

a92a7247d
Chicago
ct-ct-courtesy-campaign-a-0527-jpg-20150526
Chicago

Boston and Tokyo went a comical route.  Boston incorporated parrots into their advertisement.  Tokyo created an extreme situation of a passenger taking up too much space on the train.

Boston
Boston

 

 

 

 

Tokyo
Tokyo

 

New York City and San Francisco stayed conservative with their messages.

New York
New York
New York
New York
San Francisco
San Francisco

 

We’re looking forward to seeing which ads turn out to be most effective!

What we’re reading online this week

What we’re reading online this week:
  • NYC to increase Ferry Service throughout boroughs (link)
  • New plan to elevate Bikers in San Fran (link)
  • NY State Biking rating may surprise you (link)
  • 97% of subway stations are not cleaned regularly enough (link)
  • New York’s gay nightlife, the interactive map (link)
By Sean Lewin
Image: Anandapur Transportation by Scott Smith

NYU Rudin Study featured in NY Times

The NYU Rudin Center’s Study, “Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods,” was featured in the New York Times on May 7, 2015 in the article, “Transportation Emerges as Crucial to Escaping Poverty,” focusing on access to jobs and opportunities.

May7NYT

80 Bicicletas

We’re proud to announce the publication of Sarah Kaufman’s essay, “Citi Bike Y Pantaloncillos” (Citi Bike and Pantaloons) in the new book La Vuelta al Mundo en 80 Bicicletas (Around the World in 80 Bicycles). The essay describes gender disparities in Citi Bike usage and how they relate to the women’s liberation movement of the 1890s.

The book is available here.

 

What we’re reading this week

Image above: Cardboard apartment, via Andere Achterhuizen on Flickr

This is what we’re reading this week on the web:

  • New Yorkers are ditching buses for subways (link)
  • Middle East politics: now arriving at a station near you? (link)
  • Afghan girls, forbidden from riding bikes, are skateboarding instead. (link)
  • A MetroCard redesign we’re excited about (link)
  • The bright lights of NYC may dim (link)
  • Cortland St. station on 1 line receives a long overdue facelift  (link)

Compiled by Sean Lewin, research assistant.

What we’re reading this week

Image above: Cars being transported across Ireland in 1950, via the National Library of Ireland on Flickr

Aside from subway overcrowding and taxi data hacking, this is what we’re reading this week on the web:

  • The LaGuardia Airport renovation is in jeopardy, again. (link)
  • Indego, Philadelphia’s new bike share, opens today with 600 bicycles; users are encouraged to wear helmets. (link)
  • A new United Nations-adjacent residential tower will feature full-floor “floating gardens.” (link)
  • Cargo bikes are the new minivans. (link)
  • The hipster express: more L trains to start running this fall. (link)

Thanks to Sean Lewin, our new research assistant, for compiling this list.

Event: The Future of the Streetscape

Please join the NYU Rudin Center and the Van Alen Institute on June 11 for an evening of discussion:

How will the streetscape look and function in 20, 50, and 100 years?

The urban streetscape is facing increasing demands for space from a variety of users – pedestrians, cyclists, drivers, a spike in deliveries to homes and offices, food trucks, mobile commercial spaces, and more – without recalibrating the permitting or design. Join us for a series of presentations that ask urban planners, designers, architects, and others: What is the street of the future? We’ll review new visions for pleasant, productive streetscapes that balance the needs of transportation infrastructure, commercial activity, and residents young and old.

Sarah Kaufman, Digital Manager, and Anthony Townsend, Senior Research Scientist, will present at the event on behalf of the Rudin Center, along with esteemed professionals from throughout the transportation and tech fields.

Tickets and more information are available here: https://vanalen.org/events/on-the-street/

Students: Please email the Rudin Center for discounted tickets.

Image above via Flickr user Mel Schmidt

 

The Rudin Center in the News

The NYU Rudin Center has appeared in the press recently, discussing policy, tech and social media:

  • Smart buses and public transportation can be compatible – Sarah Kaufman in Wired. (link)
  • How NYC “has merit as a subject of art” – Mitchell Moss in the Wall Street Journal. (link)
  • Benefits of Citi Bike’s weekend reset – Mitchell Moss in The New York Times. (link)
  • Social media keeps transit riders informed – Sarah Kaufman in Government Technology. (link)
  • Anthony Townsend named to Chicago’s Internet of Things Council – Chicago Tribune. (link)

Image above: Interior of Leap Bus, via Wired.

Farewell to Traffic Lights

Sarah Kaufman, Digital Manager, wants New Yorkers to prepare for change.

“In the coming decades, a familiar overhead sight—this one fully a product of the automobile age—may disappear. The disappearance of the familiar green, yellow, and red circles above our heads will mark a profound transformation in the way we move through cities.”

Sarah illustrates how cities are transitioning away from traffic lights in a new piece from Satellite Magazine. Read more and explore some of the questions involving this trend.

Big Data, Big Picture

Next City talks to two of our researchers, Anthony Townsend and Sarah Kaufman, about patterns in big data and challenges cities face in using it. And they ask, would you share your private data for the good of city planning planning? Well, would you?

“As the data accumulates, these traffic schemas acquire a third dimension: They show a city changing not just from day to night, but from year to year.

They show a city changing not just from day to night, but from year to year. Using cellphone data, for example, “you can really see the story of how a metropolitan area has evolved, over the last decade,” says Anthony Townsend, the author of Smart Cities.

Many of these ideas are hypothetical, for the moment, because so-called “granular” data is so hard to come by…Corporate entities, like Uber’s pending data offering to Boston, don’t always meet researchers’ standards. “It’s going to be a lot of superficial data, and it’s not clear how usable it’ll be at this point,” explains Sarah Kaufman.”