What We’re Reading

We love transportation! And, we hope you enjoy this week’s reading list. This week, we’re reading about new attempts to marry shopping and dining experiences here in NYC with TurnStyle at the Columbus Circle subway station, impending L train repairs, and fun facts about floating concrete. What we’re reading this week:

What We’re Reading

In case you you missed it, our assistant director for technology programming, Sarah Kaufman, recently guest posted to the Second Avenue Sagas blog. We highly recommend you read her piece, “Transit: The Gender Difference” here.
This week, we’ve also been reading–and thinking–about the following transportation news items:

Photo by Phil Hilfiker on Flickr

Transit: The Gender Difference

Experiences in transit are as diverse as New Yorkers, and it’s time to call attention to the different ways genders approach transit in New York City.

NYU Rudin Center Assistant Director Sarah M. Kaufman has published a post in today’s Second Avenue Sagas highlighting these differences and recommended action plans.

Click here for the post.

Transit: The Gender Difference

Photo above by Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Brooklyn is the New Manhattan

Mitchell L. Moss, Professor of Urban Planning & Policy at NYU Wagner and Director of the school's Rudin Center for Transportation, has written a new op-ed describing Downtown Brooklyn's dramatic emergence as “the new model of urban redevelopment.”

“In fact,” writes Professor Moss in The New York Observer (March 29), “Brooklyn has emerged as a global brand, a symbol of urban creativity—whether in cuisine, poetry, innovative start-ups, or fashion. Brooklyn is now the destination for young, smart and pioneering kids who once flocked to Greenwich Village and the Lower East Side. Major banks, law firms, ad agencies and media conglomerates will always operate from Manhattan, but the talent they depend on no longer resides in aging suburbs or Manhattan’s upper east side—the promised land for psychiatrists, orthopedists and plastic surgeons. No county in the United States has more female-headed starts-ups than Brooklyn.”

Read the full piece, and check out the Rudin Center/Appleseed report Brooklyn Rising.

Exploring challenges in transportation and infrastructure