Tag Archives: featured

Taxi Shift-Change Hackathon: Event Recap

The NYU Rudin Center joined forces with NYC’s Taxi and Limousine Commission to help resolve the taxi shift-change issue- when taxis are unavailable between 4 and 6 p.m. due to driver handoffs of vehicles. The hackathon took place on April 11 at the Rudin Center, under the sponsorship and technical guidance of Google.

Data scientists, civic hackers, graphic designers, analysts, government policymakers, and statistics hobbyists gathered to discover solutions to the taxi gap, which is estimated to miss out on about 11,000 rides daily.

We’ll post some of the solutions soon (the hackers are still hacking!), but in the meantime, here are some pics of the event:

 

NYC TLC Commissioner Meera Joshi kicked off the event, sharing the challenges and concerns of her agency; NYU Rudin Center Director Mitchell L. Moss discussed the importance of taxis to mobility in NYC; NYC TLC Director of Research and Evaluation Rodney Stiles presented the event-related data and the shift-change issue specifics.

The 40 hackers plugged away all day long, sharing results along the way.

 

Participants were treated to a Q&A with current taxi drivers, who added the on-the-ground perspective to this work.

NYC taxi drivers respond to participant questions at the NYC TLC Shift-Change Hackathon on April 11, 2015.
NYC taxi drivers respond to participant questions at the NYC TLC Shift-Change Hackathon on April 11, 2015.

 

The NYU Rudin Center is thrilled to have hosted this first event of its kind. We hope that in the future we can help connect the public sector with smart, thoughtful individuals to work toward  solutions for civic issues.

Thanks to our participants, the NYC TLC and Google.

 

Excellence in Transportation Breakfast

The Rudin Center for Transportation celebrated Excellence in Transportation at the annual breakfast, hosted by The Modern on March 12. Keynote speaker David Plouffe, Senior Vice President of Policy and Strategy at Uber, discussed the company’s collaborations with cities and suburbs to improve transportation for the twenty-first century.

Event photos follow.

Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods

In January 2015 The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation released a new report: “Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods,” focusing on the variations of job access by transit throughout New York City.

Although public transit provides access to jobs throughout the New York City region, there are actually substantial inequalities in mobility. By focusing on the neighborhood level, the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation has identified communities that are substantially underserved by the public transportation system.

“In New York, mass transit is the path to economic mobility, not education,” Mitchell Moss, Rudin’s director, told the Wall Street Journal. “It’s far more important to have a MetroCard than a college degree.” (Gothamist)

In New York City neighborhoods where people are heavily dependent on transit but access to jobs via train or bus is mediocre, 67 percent of workers commute by transit. In these areas the average income is lower than the city average, at $46,773, and the unemployment rate is 11.7, the highest in the city.

“It’s exactly these commuters, who live just beyond the reach of convenient transit but lack the resources to own a private car, who could benefit most from improvements to the city’s transit network.” (Streetsblog)

The report recommends that policymakers increase the number of transportation modal options across the city, maximize use of existing transportation infrastructure, and foster the ability to work remotely. These solutions will benefit all New Yorkers’ access to job opportunities and economic improvement.

“We need to link transit to areas that aren’t likely to get a new subway system — using … a variety of buses, more customized buses to link people to the mass transit system,” [Moss] says. “In some cases it’s getting people to mass transit that’s the challenge.” (Vox)

 

This research was supported by The Rockefeller Foundation and Google.