Tag Archives: sarah

Recent events at the NYU Rudin Center

Current research: Intelligent Paratransit

The NYU Rudin Center’s current work surrounds “Intelligent Paratransit,” a project to re-frame mobility for the elderly and disabled using modern ridesharing technologies.

Through this work, the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation aims to find technological solutions to making paratransit across the country more cost- and time-efficient, and a better experience for its customers. We are analyzing paratransit systems worldwide, evaluating potential improvements for reservations, dispatch and routing, and recommending strategies for incorporating new technology into existing systems.

The NYU Rudin Center hosted advisory group sessions to discuss the implications of changes and advances in policy, technology, and operations as they apply to paratransit in the US and collaborate on potential solutions. The project advisory group consists of stakeholders from the public, private, non-profit and advocacy sectors.

The Intelligent Paratransit report will be released in the summer of 2016.

Intelligent Paratransit is led by Sarah M. Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center Assistant Director, and is funded by grants from TransitCenter and The New York Community Trust.

 

Transit: The Gender Difference

Experiences in transit are as diverse as New Yorkers, and it’s time to call attention to the different ways genders approach transit in New York City.

NYU Rudin Center Assistant Director Sarah M. Kaufman has published a post in today’s Second Avenue Sagas highlighting these differences and recommended action plans.

Click here for the post.

Transit: The Gender Difference

Photo above by Thomas Hawk / Flickr

A Groundbreaking Hackathon

The Staten Island Bus Hackathon, organized by the NYU Rudin Center, TransitCenter and the MTA was a resounding success and an unprecedented event. Held on Saturday, March 5th, It was highly attended and produced many implementable solutions.

Approximately 150 participants – coders, planners and other interested attendees – joined the event held at LMHQ in Lower Manhattan. Fifteen proposals for reforming Staten Island Bus service were submitted and presented.

Three prizes were awarded:

  • Grand Prize: “How to Optimize Express Bus Routes in Staten Island,” by Sri Kanajan (link)
  • Best Solution for Express Bus Service: “Better Than The Subway,” by Colin Foley, Maria Carey, Raymond Cha, Larry Gould and David McCreery (link)
  • Best Solution for Local Bus Service: “Buses in SI,” by Austin Krauza, Jenny Ye, Adam Davidson, Sunny Zheng and Steve Bauman (link)

All submissions can be viewed in the gallery.

The event was hosted by NYU Rudin Center Assistant Director Sarah Kaufman and TransitCenter Program Manager Tabitha Decker. The program featured several prominent presenters:

  • TransitCenter’s Executive Director, David Bragdon, welcomed the attendees.
  • Staten Island Borough President James Oddo discussed key transportation concerns and his high hopes for the hackathon’s outcomes.
  • The data and Staten Island Bus Study were introduced by MTA NYCT planners Jonathan Hawkins and Chris Pangalinan.
  • Key tools to be used by hackers were introduced by Felipe Hoffa (Google) and Jeff Ferzoco (CartoDB).
  • Chris Whong of CartoDB delivered the lunchtime keynote, hitting on several key ingredients necessary for successful civic hacking.

The hackathon submissions were judged by:

  • John Gaul, Vice President, 21st Century Service Delivery, MTA New York City Transit
  • Manasvi Menon, Senior Strategic Consultant, Intersection
  • Shin-pei Tsay, Deputy Executive Director, TransitCenter
  • Sarah Wyss, Senior Director, Bus Service Planning, MTA New York City Transit

The hackathon was a highly successful event showcasing the importance and value of public participation in planning and the power of data-based solutions.

Photos below and at our photo gallery.

Announcing NYC’s First-Ever Bus Hackathon

MTA New York City Transit, TransitCenter and the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation will hold the first-ever New York City Bus Hackathon on March 5, 2016. Participants will use ridership and performance data to inform and improve bus route planning. This event will build upon the MTA’s study of Staten Island bus service and will shape local data-centric transit planning in the future.

Participants will be tasked with developing proposals for a reconsidered network of express and local buses on Staten Island. MTA New York City Transit will provide unprecedented data sets, including ridership data for express routes and comprehensive archival performance data from BusTime for express and local routes. The best solutions for faster, more reliable transit for Staten Island will be rewarded and presented to local officials.

Visit the event website on DevPost.

Please join us:
Saturday March 5, 2016
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
LMHQ: 150 Broadway, 20th Floor, New York, NY

Click here to register. This event is open to the public, but requires pre-registration.

This event is organized in partnership with TransitCenter and the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation, and generously sponsored by TransitCenter. Additional support is provided by Google and CartoDB; technical assistance will be available from both organizations at the event.

 

 

Save the Date: Bus Hackathon

Join us on March 5th to rethink NYC bus planning for the 21st century. Save the date for a TransitCenter and NYU Rudin Center hackathon in partnership with MTA NYC Transit. More information and registration coming soon.

Saturday, March 5, 2016
9:00 a.m.

Register here.

Updated: Mobility, Economic Opportunity and NYC Neighborhoods

The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation has updated our January 2015 report: “Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods,” focusing on the variations of job access by transit throughout New York City. The new edition includes this year’s new transit resources, such as the 7 line station and Select Bus Service routes.

 

This research was supported by The Rockefeller Foundation and Google.

Event Announcement: PERIPHERAL PROPOSALS : Models for Commuting from the Margins

Monday, November 9
7:00pm—9:00pm
Van Alen Institute
30 W 22nd Street, New York, NY

Subways are the primary mode of transportation in New York, but we need new ideas for atypical travelers: those who live on the city’s geographic and social edges. From off-the-grid dollar vans and mobile apps for commuters with limited accessibility, to ambitious proposals to connect the boroughs’ coastlines along ferry routes, we’ll explore how ad-hoc systems, new technologies, and innovating with antique infrastructure can expand transit equity.

Participants: Eric Goldwyn, journalist; David R. Jones, president & CEO, Community Service Society; Sarah M. Kaufman, digital manager and assistant adjunct professor of planning, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation; Joanne Rausen, assistant commissioner, data & technology, NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission; Douglas Adams, Waterfront Alliance

The discussion will also include new ideas from the NYU Rudin Center’s Emerging Leaders in Transportation Fellows.

This event is presented in partnership with the Van Alen Institute.

Purchase tickets here. Students qualify for free entry; please contact the Rudin Center for more information.

U.S. Transportation Secretary Foxx Speaks on a Rudin Center Panel

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx visited the NYU Rudin Center on July 21st. He spoke about “Transportation, Social Mobility, and Cities,” on a panel with David R. Jones, President and CEO of the Community Service Society of New York, Sarah M. Kaufman, Assistant Director for Technology Programming at the NYU Rudin Center, and Patrick Sharkey, Associate Professor of Sociology at NYU. The panel was moderated by NYU Rudin Center Director Mitchell L. Moss.

The discussion focused on improving access to education and job opportunities, as featured in the Rudin Center report “Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods.” Secretary Foxx shared his childhood experiences that led him to value the importance of transportation in upward mobility. Sharkey emphasized the need for low-income populations to escape clustering effects. Jones explained the exceptional difficulties faced by low-income workers trying to travel in NYC, and Kaufman recommended the use of data for intelligent transit planning.

Photos by Don Pollard.