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Jose Soegaard discusses waterfront development at Short Talks, Big Ideas, 9/23/14

Event Recap: Short Talks, Big Ideas

Last night’s Short Talks, Big Ideas featured the best in transportation innovations of late:

Arlene Ducao showed off her MindRider brain wave-tracking bike helmets, which help map biking stress points in NYC.

Richard Dunks discussed the missing link in data processing (what to do with all this data), focusing on his Water Street Corridorscope project (with Jeff Ferzoco).

Paul Salama showed the potential for green loading zones, such as priority delivery windows for electric trucks.

Jose Soegaard taught us the importance of a functional NYC waterfront, including ferries that have been used in emergency evacuations.

Malinda Foy showcased new work at MTA Bridges and Tunnels, and fielded several questions about potential for biking on bridges (answer: hopefully!).

Neysa Pranger dove into potential uses for beacon technology to improve transit by sharing applicable information to riders’ devices.

Ryan Russo shared Vision Zero’s important initiatives to improve pedestrian safety in New York City, estimating that two million speeding tickets will be issued in 2014.

John Biggs discussed travel in reality and fiction, including his new young adult novel, “Mytro,” featuring a magical worldwide subway.

The event was moderated by Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation. Please contact her if you have a big idea to share at the next event.

 

See the photos below (by Lauren Holter and Sarah Kaufman, in a very dark room) and visit the tweetstream for further discussion.

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Introducing the Emerging Leaders in Transportation Fellows

Congratulations to the inaugural class of Emerging Leaders in Transportation! We are thrilled to welcome these impressive individuals this fall to the NYU Rudin Center to amplify their leadership skills, develop new ideas to bring to their workplaces, and create an innovator network among local transportation organizations. We can’t wait to see what they do.

Meet the Fellows:

 

Onyinye Akujuo, from Queens, NY is an Assistant Director of Grant Management for the New York State Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA); she has delivered over 8 years’ experience in public service with a major career focus on the transportation funding and planning sector.

John Baker is Technical Staff at Consensus Systems Technologies, where he specializes in geographic information systems, regional ITS architectures, systems engineering, and the design and implementation of ITS standards.

 Stephanie Camay is a Lead Planner at Parsons Brinckerhoff, with experience in a variety of assignments including alternative analyses for rail and bus rapid transit corridors, neighborhood transportation studies, transit feasibility studies, EIS documentation, and stakeholder and public participation strategy development and implementation.

Graham Cavanagh: With an MS in City and Regional Planning from Pratt Institute and now working at the NYC DOT Manhattan Borough Commissioner’s Office, Graham Cavanagh has been greatly influenced by the values of communication design and community participation in the planning process – with the intention to promote safe, healthy, and innovative Cities.

Jana Langhammer is an electrical engineer at JFK Airport, aviation geek born in Prague, world traveler, surfer and piano player.

Andrew Lappitt works at TransOptions, a transportation-oriented nonprofit in New Jersey and has a strong interest in communicating the impacts of transportation planning concepts and principles to the public.

Aviva Laurenti is a traffic engineer (and avid cyclist) working at Sam Schwartz Engineering primarily on transportation analyses for environmental review documents with experience in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Christopher Lee is a Senior External Relations Representative for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, focusing on Government and Community Outreach to elected officials and groups in the Boroughs of Staten Island and Manhattan.

Stephanie Lotshaw is a Program Manager in the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy’s US & Africa office; her work focuses on helping cities on both continents to implement gold-standard BRT and has also recently focused on working with cities to develop high quality transit-oriented development (TOD).

Dawn Miller is the Executive Director of Strategic Planning at the NYC Taxi and Limousine Commission, where she focuses on improving access to safe, convenient, high-quality for-hire transportation throughout the city.

Jacob Nussbaum: Originally from Charleston, SC, Jacob graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2012 with a BA in Urban Studies and currently works for JetBlue Airways in Revenue Management.

Kate Rube is the Transportation Program Manager at Project for Public Spaces, and she works to foster great streets and sustainable communities through policy, training, and technical assistance work.

Frank Ruchala Jr is an associate city planner and urban designer at New York’s Department of City Planning’s Manhattan Office where he is the primary project manager for Midtown Manhattan.

Patrick Sabol: As a researcher at the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, Patrick’s work is focused on identifying, developing, and implementing innovative new approaches to infrastructure funding and finance.

Rodney Stiles is a graduate of the Bloustein School for Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers, and he is coming to terms with being an expert on the taxi industry in New York City—a symptom of years of combing through millions of taxi trip and administrative records to find answers for his bosses.

Tiffany-Ann Taylor is a formally trained Urban Planner with a passion for transportation planning, emergency management, public policy and community infrastructure.

Midori Valdivia is currently a Senior Advisor to the Executive Director of the Port Authority and has a background in urban planning and financial management.

Ema Carol Yamamoto: Equipped with degrees in civil engineering and transportation planning, Ema works to advance the state of transportation in Philadelphia as a Planner/Analyst for Philadelphia’s Mayor’s Office of Transportation & Utilities.

Beth Zall is a Transportation Planner at Parsons Brinckerhoff who is currently actively involved in the Port Authority Midtown Bus Master Plan effort.

 

The fellowship will be directed by Sarah Kaufman of the NYU Rudin Center.

This fellowship is co-sponsored by the University Transportation Research Center.

Stacey Hodge proposes off-hour deliveries at Short Talks, Big Ideas - April 7, 2014

New event: Short Talks, Big Ideas

Join us at the sixth edition of Short Talks, Big Ideas on September 23rd.

RSVP here - http://wagner.nyu.edu/events/rudin-09-23-2014

Sponsored by the Rudin Center and by the University Transportation Research Center

Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Time: 6:30pm – 9:30pm
Location:  295 Lafayette Street, 2nd Floor, NYC
                 The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue


Join the NYU Rudin Center to learn about the frontiers of transportation in this sixth event of the Short Talks, Big Ideas series.
Speakers will deliver lightning presentations about their work and ideas, followed by networking and refreshments. We guarantee the audience will learn something new.

Confirmed Speakers:
John Biggs, TechCrunch – “Mytro”
Arlene Ducao, MindRider – Brain wave-tracking bike helmets
Richard Dunks, NYU CUSP – Water Street Corridorscope
Malinda Foy, MTA Bridges and Tunnels
Neysa Pranger, Control Group – Beacon technology for transit
Ryan Russo, NYC DOT – Vision Zero
Paul Salama, WXY Architecture + Urban Design – Green loading zones
Jose Soegaard, Metropolitan Waterfront Alliance – Development of the NY/NJ waterfront

Moderator:
Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center for Transportation

Follow @NYURudin for more speaker announcements, and join the discussion on Twitter at #BigIdeas14

 

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New Program: Emerging Leaders in Transportation

Announcing the NYU Rudin Center’s new fellowship for Emerging Leaders in Transportation.

In this fellowship program, participants will learn from top transportation and management professionals to enhance leadership skills and policy work to bring innovative ideas into practice. During three half-day sessions, emerging leaders will build long-term leadership goals and will focus on developing innovative projects and ideas within an organization.

The three half-days will cover:

- Leadership and Transportation
- Leadership and Innovation
- Building Support for Innovation

Sessions will include talks from esteemed professionals and group discussions and exercises. Participants will be expected to complete assignments between sessions, and by the program’s conclusion, should have a plan to introduce an innovative solution or concept within their workplaces.

Applications due August 15, 2014. APPLY HERE: http://wagner.nyu.edu/rudincenter/fellowship_application/

Details:

  • The program is open to transportation professionals with up to 10 years of experience.
  • The program will be held on three half-days: October 10, 17 and 24.
  • There is no cost for participating in the program.
  • We are unable to subsidize travel or lodging for participants.

Further questions? Email rudin.center@nyu.edu.

This program is supported by a grant from the University Transportation Research Center.

Gabriel Royal, NYC Subway Cellist // flickr: Dan Nguyen

Transportation: the Music!

Join the NYU Rudin Center on a musical journey as we explore all the transportation songs known to Spotify. Whether you’re a fan of Gladys Knight, Arcade Fire or MIA, you’ll surely find a plane, train or automobile tune that works for you. The playlist is collaborative, so feel free to add your own tunes! We’ll add along the way.

Can’t see the embedded playlist above? Here’s the direct link: Transportation Songs

Image at top: Gabriel Royal, NYC Subway Cellist  // flickr: Dan Nguyen
Special thanks to NYU Rudin Center intern Andrew Poeppel for compiling the playlist generated by Rudin Center employees and students past and present.

flickr // momentcaptured1

Map: Subway Stations with Wireless Service

Where can you use your cell phone underground? Here’s a map to show you which 37 subway stations are wired for access. According to MTA and Transit Wireless, the consortium responsible for building out the access, the 241 remaining underground stations will come online  within four years.


// Map by NYU Rudin Center intern Andrew Poeppel – data from Transit Wireless

Top image: flickr // momentcaptured1

Big Ideas for Transportation - 7/8/2014

Big Ideas for Transportation: Recap and Photos

Last night’s panel on Big Ideas for Transportation, co-hosted by the Rudin Center, Downtown Alliance and Control Group, featured fantastic talks against the scenic background of South Street Seaport.

The speaker lineup:

Introductions:

Panelists:

  • Chris Whong, Socrata, explored the notion of hardware-based taxi hailing devices, bringing the internet of things to the urban street corner.
  • Florent Pyre, Placemeter, discussed Placemeter Speedbuster, a crowdsourcing initiative that allows citizens to let city agenciesidentify traffic hotspots that warrant additional stop signs, speed bumps, or traffic patrols by placing a small sensor in their windows and leveraging computer vision.
  • Joe Dack, NYC DOT, discussed freight activity and give an overview of solutions that organizations can adopt to reduce the impact of freight activity in the urban area.
  • Eric Goldwyn, Columbia University School of Architecture, Preservation & Planning, made the case for expanded ferry service between Lower Manhattan, Northern Brooklyn, and Western Queens.
  • Justin Schultz, MTA Capital Construction, discussed the changing landscape in Lower Manhattan and transit’s role in the creation ofa truly 24/7 community.
  • Neysa Pranger (Moderator), Control Group

Some photos of the event:

Thanks to event co-organizers Daria Siegel and Stacey Levine, and to Jeff Ferzoco for photography.

Members of the Google PDF 2014 Fellowship and Google Staff

Personal Democracy and Transportation

By Sarah Kaufman

Last week I attended the Personal Democracy Forum, an annual two-day symposium on the intersection of technology and politics, and often the source of much rabble-rousing in online rights. This year’s theme was “Save the Internet / The Internet Saves,” referring to the massive data-gathering of online records by government contrasted with the frequent positive interactions and movements only made possible by the internet’s connectivity.

I had the pleasure of participating in the conference as one of fifteen Google PDF Fellows who, like me, believe in the power of the internet and open data to make our cities and countries better places to live, work and get around. That Microsoft and Google were major sponsors of a conference on individualized web rights speaks volumes about the current push-pull relationship between simultaneous calls for personal privacy and government transparency.

That push-pull exists widely in transportation as well: We do not want our movements tracked, but we want Uber cars on demand. We want real-time information about how many people are in a station, but don’t want our own MetroCard swipes made public. We want traffic data, but don’t want our phones constantly being pinged for motion detection.

When it comes to transportation, we are often being tracked more than it seems, and up to this point, it has worked out to our benefit. Significant sets of transportation data, including procurement practices and taxi trips, should still be opened quickly and in digestible formats to take us to the next level of smart mobility.

However, privatized modes constitute a growing sector of transportation, including Uber, ZipCar and corporate shuttle buses. None of those modes are legally required to disclose data, but imagine if they did: perhaps cities would be more amenable to the working e-hail model, residents of congested cities could be incentivized to car-share rather than own, and road use fees could be charged appropriately to private buses to help pay for public ones. In a disaster, such as after a storm that knocks out a city’s subway system, data on all of these modes would help mobilize the city to ensure that residents can get to home, work and safe spaces.

It’s time to embrace these private transportation providers as important transportation networks while also requiring them to provide open data, for the greater good of urban mobility.

Members of the Google PDF 2014 Fellowship and Google Staff
Members of the Google PDF 2014 Fellowship and Google Staff (photo courtesy of Google)
Dani Simons (Citi Bike) presenting at the Citi Bike Data Showcase on May 28, 2014

Recap and Photos: Citi Bike Data Showcase

Last night’s Citi Bike Data Showcase brought a full, fun crowd to talk about visualizations, apps and nuances of Citi Bike use and analysis. Hosted by the Rudin Center and emceed by Noel Hidalgo of BetaNYC, the event featured several brief talks:

  • Dani Simons, Director of Marketing at NYC Bike Share, showed how the organization uses its data to manage bike fleets and where the system expansion may occur going forward.
  • Jeff Ferzoco (linepointpath) and Alex Chohlas-Wood (NYU CUSP) discussed their upcoming project of calculating bike salmoning.
  • Aaron Fraint (Hunter College) showed his favorite coding tools for analysis and visualization, including some processes that can take three days to complete.  (link)
  • Ben Wellington (I Quant NY/Pratt) demonstrated the process of map creation using Citi Bike and NYC data with free coding tools.
  • Sarah Kaufman (NYU Rudin Center) discussed gender, Citi Bike, and the modern freedoms reflective of women’s discovery of pantaloons.
  • Amy Wu and Luke Stern (SVA) redesigning Citi Bike’s checkout and kiosk process

Frank Hebbert (Open Plans) closed out the event by showcasing his new #bikestoday tool, which automatically counts bikes riding past.

See event photos below (by Jeff Ferzoco).