Tag Archives: smart cities

Farewell to Traffic Lights

Sarah Kaufman, Digital Manager, wants New Yorkers to prepare for change.

“In the coming decades, a familiar overhead sight—this one fully a product of the automobile age—may disappear. The disappearance of the familiar green, yellow, and red circles above our heads will mark a profound transformation in the way we move through cities.”

Sarah illustrates how cities are transitioning away from traffic lights in a new piece from Satellite Magazine. Read more and explore some of the questions involving this trend.

Big Data, Big Picture

Next City talks to two of our researchers, Anthony Townsend and Sarah Kaufman, about patterns in big data and challenges cities face in using it. And they ask, would you share your private data for the good of city planning planning? Well, would you?

“As the data accumulates, these traffic schemas acquire a third dimension: They show a city changing not just from day to night, but from year to year.

They show a city changing not just from day to night, but from year to year. Using cellphone data, for example, “you can really see the story of how a metropolitan area has evolved, over the last decade,” says Anthony Townsend, the author of Smart Cities.

Many of these ideas are hypothetical, for the moment, because so-called “granular” data is so hard to come by…Corporate entities, like Uber’s pending data offering to Boston, don’t always meet researchers’ standards. “It’s going to be a lot of superficial data, and it’s not clear how usable it’ll be at this point,” explains Sarah Kaufman.”

Interview: Anthony Townsend in Atlantic Cities

SmartCities.embed_NYU Rudin Senior Research Fellow Anthony Townsend discussed his new book and the growth of smart cities in Atlantic Cities. He said, “in 2011 when I started writing Smart Cities, the best forecast of the smart city market, in terms of credibility and without being too, sort of, puffing it up, was this group called Pike Research based in Boulder, Colorado. And they tagged it at $100 billion through 2020. And recently, about a month ago, the U.K. released its own forecast, and they’re saying $400 billion a year.” Read more here.