Jody Spiro
Adjunct Professor of Public Administration

Jody Spiro is the Director of Education Leadership for The Wallace Foundation. Prior to this appointment, she served as the Foundation’s senior education program officer since 2002. She works with leaders from throughout the country on improving their education leadership programs and systems. Her career-to-date as a senior educator and manager of education programs has spanned the private, public, non-profit, and international sectors. Her areas of specialization include leadership, facilitating active learning and organizational change processes. Previous positions have included: Director of Education Development Center’s New York Office of Global Learning; Executive Director of the Soros Foundations for the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union and the Baltic States; University Planning Officer and Secretary of the Board of Trustees at Long Island University; Senior Assistant to the New York City School’s Chancellor; Director of Principals’ Professional Development, New York City Board of Education; and Second Vice President for Professional Development of Chase Manhattan Bank.

For the past 19 years, Dr. Spiro has also served as adjunct professor at New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, teaching courses in strategic management, the management of change, capstone, and international non-governmental organizations.

She holds her doctorate, in Adult and Higher Education, from Teachers College, Columbia University. She has a master’s degree in Public Administration from New York University, and a bachelor’s degree from Barnard College. She is the author of Leading Change Step-by-Step: Tactics, Tools and Tales (Jossey-Bass, 2011) and The Leading Change Handbook (The Wallace Foundation, 2009).

 

Semester Course
Fall 2011 PADM-GP.2110.002 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 INTL-GP.2216.001 International Organizations: NGOs

The role of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) in relief and development has grown more complex and urgent in recent years. From the shocking poverty of sub-Saharan Africa, stabilization of Afghanistan, earthquake relief in Haiti, floods in Pakistan, and the youth bulge throughout the developing world, INGOs ability to tackle issues cross disciplines in a coordinated and sustainable way is central to their success. This course is designed to help students increase their knowledge and understanding of such organizations -- what they do, how they operate, the complex issues they face, and how they can be more effective in achieving their development goals. This includes analyses of the implications of international structures, human resources, cultures, the role of global politics, key management skills needed and career possibilities. Throughout the course, we will analyze and discuss various structural and management issues central to working at an INGO including:

• The changing role of INGOs in international development, including the growing role of contractors, security issues,
• Civilian-Military relations (whether and how INGOs should work with military agencies)
• INGOs role vis-à-vis donors and governments
• How INGOs are structured operationally and programmatically (the HQ-field divide) and how to manage the tensions
• Working in diverse cultures and on dispersed teams
• Living the agency’s values: ethical dilemmas

The course will use a mixture of cases, experiential exercises, debates, and classroom discussions to elicit these themes so that students can wrestle with the complexities of working in an INGO.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 INTL-GP.2216.001 International Organizations: NGOs

The role of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) in relief and development has grown more complex and urgent in recent years. From the shocking poverty of sub-Saharan Africa, stabilization of Afghanistan, earthquake relief in Haiti, floods in Pakistan, and the youth bulge throughout the developing world, INGOs ability to tackle issues cross disciplines in a coordinated and sustainable way is central to their success. This course is designed to help students increase their knowledge and understanding of such organizations -- what they do, how they operate, the complex issues they face, and how they can be more effective in achieving their development goals. This includes analyses of the implications of international structures, human resources, cultures, the role of global politics, key management skills needed and career possibilities. Throughout the course, we will analyze and discuss various structural and management issues central to working at an INGO including:

• The changing role of INGOs in international development, including the growing role of contractors, security issues,
• Civilian-Military relations (whether and how INGOs should work with military agencies)
• INGOs role vis-à-vis donors and governments
• How INGOs are structured operationally and programmatically (the HQ-field divide) and how to manage the tensions
• Working in diverse cultures and on dispersed teams
• Living the agency’s values: ethical dilemmas

The course will use a mixture of cases, experiential exercises, debates, and classroom discussions to elicit these themes so that students can wrestle with the complexities of working in an INGO.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 CAP-GP.3226.004 Capstone: Advanced Project in International Management and Policy

Couples with CAP-GP.3227.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Capstone, in architecture, is the crowning piece of an arch, the center stone that holds the arch together, giving it shape and strength. Wagner's Capstone program plays a similar role, by providing students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 PADM-GP.2110.002 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 INTL-GP.2216.001 International Organizations: NGOs

The role of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) in relief and development has grown more complex and urgent in recent years. From the shocking poverty of sub-Saharan Africa, stabilization of Afghanistan, earthquake relief in Haiti, floods in Pakistan, and the youth bulge throughout the developing world, INGOs ability to tackle issues cross disciplines in a coordinated and sustainable way is central to their success. This course is designed to help students increase their knowledge and understanding of such organizations -- what they do, how they operate, the complex issues they face, and how they can be more effective in achieving their development goals. This includes analyses of the implications of international structures, human resources, cultures, the role of global politics, key management skills needed and career possibilities. Throughout the course, we will analyze and discuss various structural and management issues central to working at an INGO including:

• The changing role of INGOs in international development, including the growing role of contractors, security issues,
• Civilian-Military relations (whether and how INGOs should work with military agencies)
• INGOs role vis-à-vis donors and governments
• How INGOs are structured operationally and programmatically (the HQ-field divide) and how to manage the tensions
• Working in diverse cultures and on dispersed teams
• Living the agency’s values: ethical dilemmas

The course will use a mixture of cases, experiential exercises, debates, and classroom discussions to elicit these themes so that students can wrestle with the complexities of working in an INGO.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 CAP-GP.3227.003 Capstone: Advanced Project in International Management and Policy

Continuation of CAP-GP.3226.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Capstone, in architecture, is the crowning piece of an arch, the center stone that holds the arch together, giving it shape and strength. Wagner's Capstone program plays a similar role, by providing students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 CAP-GP.3226.003 Capstone: Advanced Project in International Management and Policy

Couples with CAP-GP.3227.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Capstone, in architecture, is the crowning piece of an arch, the center stone that holds the arch together, giving it shape and strength. Wagner's Capstone program plays a similar role, by providing students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 PADM-GP.2110.002 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 INTL-GP.2216.001 International Organizations: NGOs

The role of International Non-Governmental Organizations (INGOs) in relief and development has grown more complex and urgent in recent years. From the shocking poverty of sub-Saharan Africa, stabilization of Afghanistan, earthquake relief in Haiti, floods in Pakistan, and the youth bulge throughout the developing world, INGOs ability to tackle issues cross disciplines in a coordinated and sustainable way is central to their success. This course is designed to help students increase their knowledge and understanding of such organizations -- what they do, how they operate, the complex issues they face, and how they can be more effective in achieving their development goals. This includes analyses of the implications of international structures, human resources, cultures, the role of global politics, key management skills needed and career possibilities. Throughout the course, we will analyze and discuss various structural and management issues central to working at an INGO including:

• The changing role of INGOs in international development, including the growing role of contractors, security issues,
• Civilian-Military relations (whether and how INGOs should work with military agencies)
• INGOs role vis-à-vis donors and governments
• How INGOs are structured operationally and programmatically (the HQ-field divide) and how to manage the tensions
• Working in diverse cultures and on dispersed teams
• Living the agency’s values: ethical dilemmas

The course will use a mixture of cases, experiential exercises, debates, and classroom discussions to elicit these themes so that students can wrestle with the complexities of working in an INGO.


Download Syllabus
Date Publication/Paper
2011

Spiro, Jody 2011. Leading Change Step-by-Step: Tactics, Tools, and Tales San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc., January 2011.
Abstract

Leading Change Step-by-Step offers a comprehensive and practical guide for leaders.  This field-tested approach has been used successfully bot more than a decade in a wide variety of organizations including nonprofits, schools and districts, universities, public, and international agencies.  The book is filled with proven tactics for implementing change successfully, with tools to put the tactics into practice, and common mistakes to avoid.  Also included are stories of struggle and success that show how this approach has been used effectively in 22 states and internationally.  The approach helps guide leaders through analyzing situations, ideitifying stakeholders, and working with them effectively to bring about the desired results.

2010

Spiro, J. 2010. The Global Workforce The Handbook of Technology Management, Volume 2, pp. 629-640. John Wiley and Sons.
Abstract

2009

Spiro, J. 2009. Leading Change Handbook Copyright 2009 by Jody Spiro. Published by The Wallace Foundation, 35p.
Download Handbook
Abstract

Leading change is a topic of paramount importance. But a missing ingredient for many such leaders has been how to translate concepts into actions, continuous improvements and sustainable results. This toolkit by Wallace Senior Education Program Officer Jody Spiro was developed to fill that need in several key areas of the change process: assessing and improving participants' readiness; engaging stakeholders; planning "early wins;" minimizing resistance; using collaborative planning methods; and developing ways to bring initiatives to scale and sustain them over time.