Urban Planning

UPSA Hosts Mayor Bloomberg on NYC's future

UPSA Hosts Mayor Bloomberg on NYC's future

Mayor Bloomberg with UPSA chair Sandra Rothbard

     Mayor Michael Bloomberg provided an optimistic forecast of the city's future in a talk he delivered October 26, 2009, at New York University's Kimmel Center as a guest of NYU Wagner's Urban Planning Students Association (UPSA). More than 100 Wagner students attended the event and heard an introduction by UPSA chair Sandra Rothbard. Bloomberg, in his remarks, said he envisions improvements in transit service, affordable housing, education, public safety, and the environment. He said he was pleased to talk with students who attend the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, a school, he noted with a smile, that is named for a "distinguished three-term mayor." Bloomberg ended his remarks with a straight-forward nod to Wagner and its "impressive" alumni working in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors.

Urban Design is a Matter of Public Health [Video]

Urban Design is a Matter of Public Health [Video]

New York City Health Commissioner Thomas Farley

New York City Health Commissioner Thomas Farley was the keynoter at the "Speeding Summit" held at NYU Wagner on November 19, 2010 -- and he pledged a major new public health emphasis on urban design.

"After quitting smoking, there's probably no behavior that promotes health more than regular physical activity," said Dr. Farley. "Okay, that's great. So what are we going to do about that? To me, the answer to that is thoughtful urban design and transportation infrastructure. "

The event, sponsored by the nonprofit group Transportation Alternatives, examined a proposal by cycling and other traffic safety advocates to reduce the side-street speed limit from 30 mph to 20 mph, and was hosted by the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management at NYU Wagner.

 

 

Urban Planning Students Publish February 2006 Edition of The Wagner Planner

Urban Planning Students Publish February 2006 Edition of The Wagner Planner

Published by the Urban Planning Student Association (UPSA), The Wagner Planner provides a forum to explore issues shaping the field of urban and city planning.

In focusing on sustainable development in their latest issue, The Wagner Planner Editors Uma Deshmukh and Susan Willetts were able to contrast the goals of sustainable development with the damage wrought by Hurricane Katrina. They note, "Comprehending the importance of sustainable development in real-world situations is less obvious. This past fall, Hurricane Katrina provided that understanding by underscoring how short-sighted environmental and policy decisions along the Gulf Coast created damaging, lasting effects for the region."

The issue also includes pieces on sustainable development projects in Seattle and New Jersey; an interview with an environmental designer working on a sustainable master plan for a major university; and, the latest software created to improve environmental decision-making.

Click here to read The Wagner Planner.

Urban Planning Students Publish Winter Edition of The Wagner Planner

Urban Planning Students Publish Winter Edition of The Wagner Planner

The Wagner Urban Planning Student Association (UPSA) published a new edition of The Wagner Planner, a newsletter highlighting events and issues of importance to the urban planning community at The Wagner School.

Urban Policy Students Explore China's Massive Urbanization in Shanghai Summer Course

Urban Policy Students Explore China's Massive Urbanization in Shanghai Summer Course

Students in Wagner's 2011 summer course utilized Shanghai's bike-share program, the largest in the world.

Within the next 20 years, China will move 300 million people--similar in number to the entire U.S. population--from rural to urban areas. This massive and rapid urbanization poses tremendous challenges to environment and sustainability, but also offers great opportunities for industrial restructuring and economic development.

Zhan Guo, an assistant professor of urban planning and transportation policy at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, has completed the second summer course in Shanghai, exposing 19 students during the summer of 2011 to the unparalleled transition from a centrally controlled economy to a market oriented economy. The urban policy students are from Wagner and several other graduate schools across the United States.

The 12-day course, to be offered each summer, exposes students to diverse issues under this context, such as the household registration system, migrant rural workers, motorization and high speed rail, the land finance and real estate bubble, property rights and forced eviction, economic development zones, and environmental protection. The course is held at NYU Shanghai [http://www.nyu.edu/global/shanghai/campus/campus_photos.htm], and combines classroom lectures, local guest speakers, visits to local organizations, and field trips in Shanghai and nearby towns and villages.

Excursions take students on visits to migrant worker enclaves, suburban ghost "new towns," and the vast Yangshan deep-water port, the Suzhou Industrial Park (SIP), a large-scale mixed-class residential development, and Bao Steel factory.

Students also met the planning director of Suzhou and chief planner for SIP, discussed  the real estate bubble with one of the largest developers in Shanghai, participated in a workshop at an architectural studio, and interacted with domestic students.

NYU Wagner courses abroad provide students and professionals with an opportunity to enhance conceptual knowledge, learn and interact with leading experts in the field, and apply new skills in a practical setting - in Accra, Ghana; in Cape Town, South Africa; and in Geneva, Switzerland, in addition to Shanghai.

For more information about the Shanghai program, please visit here: http://wagner.nyu.edu/shanghai.

 

Wagner Faculty Op-Eds

Wagner Faculty Op-Eds

Professors Dall Forsythe and Dennis Smith weighed in with recent op-ed essays in the Albany Times-Union and New York Post, respectively. Prof. Forsythe, who served as budget director under Gov. Mario Cuomo, co-authored an opinion piece May 17 arguing for a change in the state government's fiscal year. He said a July 1 fiscal year, which 46 states already have, would create more time for legislative participation, better information about revenues, and an opportunity to produce a completed budget on time. Prof. Smith, meanwhile, co-wrote an essay May 9 that underscores the risks of paying newly hired New York City police officers just $25,100 a year, a 40-percent drop compared to the previous contractual starting pay for rookie officers.

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