Furman Center

Research at NYU Wagner will explore how transportation and housing sectors can help build a "culture of health"

Research at NYU Wagner will explore how transportation and housing sectors can help build a "culture of health"

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has selected NYU Wagner to carry out research on policies, laws, and other regulatory tools that can support RWJF’s mission to build a “culture of health” in the public and private sectors. RWJF’s new research program, Policies for Action, or P4A, is based at the Temple University Center for Health Law, Policy and Practice. P4A will build on the work and insights of the Temple team’s six years of experience with its Public Health Law Research program, an RWFJ grantee. While P4A will continue to explore policies and laws that are traditionally and directly correlated with health outcomes — for instance, seatbelt laws or laws related to who can prescribe prescription drugs — the program is expanding its focus to other areas that impact health and equity in nontraditional ways, including policies and regulations from areas such as education, economics, transportation, justice, and housing.

RWJF has made an initial commitment of roughly $25 million over the next three years for research that begins to explore what builds a culture of health. NYU Wagner is one of several institutions around the country that have been chosen to be a research Hub under the program. Sherry Glied, Dean of Wagner, serves as Hub leader. The funded projects at Wagner will explore ways in which housing affects health, as well as the impact of transportation on health.

Taking the Measure of Business Improvement Districts

Taking the Measure of Business Improvement Districts

On July 25, 2007, the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy issued a report measuring the impact of New York City's Business Improvement Districts on the value of properties within their boundaries. The Benefits of Business Improvement Districts: Evidence from New York City is the first empirical analysis of the effects of BIDs on property values, and can be used to better understand the role these organizations play in local economic development. The study was covered by Crain's upon its release. “BIDs are widely touted as a way to increase business activity and boost the commercial success of a neighborhood,” said Ingrid Gould Ellen, co-director of the Furman Center and a professor at NYU’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. “We wanted to test how much of a difference BIDs really make, and whether their investments were being reflected in the property values of the communities they serve. While we expected we might find positive impacts, we did not expect that large BIDs would generate such substantial impacts, nor did we expect to see such a significant difference between the impacts of large and small BIDs.”

Taub, Furman Centers Launch Housing Breakfast Series

Taub, Furman Centers Launch Housing Breakfast Series

FEBRUARY, 2002

The Taub Center For Urban Policy Research and the Furman Center For Real Estate and Urban Policy have begun a monthly breakfast series on housing. The first breakfast on February 28th featured Jerilyn Perine, Commissioner of the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development and a former Wagner graduate student in urban planning, who spoke on "New Directions in Housing Policy."

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