Research

Capstone Projects Exhibited at Lively NYU Wagner Expo

Capstone Projects Exhibited at Lively NYU Wagner Expo

NYU Wagner graduate students exhibited the findings of their 2015 Capstone team consultancy and research projects at a highly enthusiastic, dynamic expo that brought together hundreds of alumni, faculty, public service managers, and policymakers at the Kimmel Center for University Life on May 12.

Eighty-nine Capstone efforts, each tackling a critical challenge faced by a nonprofit, public, or private sector organization, were unveiled, their authors using laptops, full-color poster boards, and carefully sifted data to explain the impact of their projects for their client agency and the public at large.

The year’s work of the MPA and MUP students delved into complex questions of management, finance, policy, health care, urban planning, and applied research in local, domestic, and international realms.

Among the organizational clients served by the Capstone teams were: God’s Love We Deliver, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the China Center for Urban DSC_0148.JPGDevelopment, Impact Hub Mexico City, Chevron Liberia, the World Bank South Asia Urban Sector, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, the City of Long Beach, N.Y., and numerous others.

For the nonprofit God’s Love We Deliver, the Capstone team identified growth potential and service gaps for New York City area food and nutrition service. For the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, a team explored ways to improve internal workflow process and response rates. In Long Beach, a community hit hard by Hurricane Sandy, a team worked on developing an integrated transportation plan. The impact of Chevron Liberia’s social investment program was still another team’s focus.

Capstone, a requirement of the Master of Public Administration and Master of Urban Planning programs at NYU Wagner, provides students with both a critical learning experience and an opportunity to perform a public service. Over the course of an academic year, students in Capstone work in teams with faculty oversight to address challenges and identify opportunities for a client organization or to conduct research on a pressing social question. 

Capstone projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills such as project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. For students, it's an opportunity to apply their classroom learning in real time to unpredictable, complex, real-world situations.

The Capstone Program was originally funded with a generous grant from the Ford Foundation in 1995. Since then, more than 5,200 students have completed nearly 1,200 projects for more than 800 organizations. FJC: A Foundation of Philanthropic Funds provided generous financial support for this year's Capstone Program.

CHPSR's Berry Published

CHPSR's Berry Published

Research Associate Professor Carolyn Anne Berry, deputy director of NYU Wagner�s Center for Health and Public Service Research [CHPSR], co-authored an article, �Nutrient Intake of Adolescents with Diabetes,� in the journal Diabetes Educator [28(3), pp.382-388]. She also recently co-wrote an article, �The Relationship of Life Stressors and Maternal Depression to Pediatric Asthma Morbidity in a Subspecialty Practice,� for the journal Ambulatory Pediatrics [1(4), pp. 185-193].

Communications Training Leads to Better Medical Student Performance

Communications Training Leads to Better Medical Student Performance

Comprehensive training in doctor-patient communications significantly improved the ability of medical students to understand and address patients' needs, according to a study in the September 3rd issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association. "We believe this study establishes that the systematic teaching of communication skills is critical to effective and humane healthcare delivery," said Michael Yedidia, Ph.D, of NYU Wagner, the study's senior author. "We're hopeful that our tools for measuring communications competence will be useful to other schools for teaching as well as evaluation purposes."

Conference on Social Theory, Politics and the Arts, Oct. 11-13

Conference on Social Theory, Politics and the Arts, Oct. 11-13

On October 11th, 12th and 13th, the Conference on Social Theory, Politics and the Arts (STP&A) -- the premier arts and cultural policy conference - will be conducted for the first time in more than a decade in New York City, and the first time ever at NYU. The 33rd annual conference, which was held last year in Vienna, Austria, will be chaired by NYU Wagner Professor Ruth Ann Stewart. It begins Thursday evening, Oct. 11, 2007, with an opening reception in the Puck Building in Manhattan, the landmark home of the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. About 200 scholars, artists, and cultural-organization leaders from 26 countries and 22 states throughout the U.S. are expected to attend the conference and share their professional experience and research findings through papers and panels. The six conference themes are: Artists, Activism, and Social Change; Leadership in, of, and through the Arts; Sustaining Cultural Industries and Organizations; Role of the Arts in Bridging Ethnic, Cultural, and Regional Differences; Cultural Planning, Development, and Economics; Urban Revitalization and the Arts.

The online conference schedule can be found at http://stpa.culture.info. Anyone interested in attending this exciting event may contact the Conference Coordinator, Darren Flusche, at stpa2007@gmail.co.

Congress, Defense Issues, and the Future

Congress, Defense Issues, and the Future

NYU Wagner's Brademas Center for the Study of Congress held a well-attended and timely forum Dec. 14, 2007, on how the U.S. Congress can come to grips with looming defense issues such as the War on Terror, changes in force structure, Department of Defense reform, and base closings. The question addressed by the panel convened by Paul C. Light, Paulette Goddard Professor of Public Service at Wagner, was, "How can Congress address these defense issues before they become intractable?" Part of a series of Brademas Center discussions on Congressional decision making titled "Legislating for the Future," the forum took place in the Rayburn Building in Washington, D.C., and included leading scholars on defense: Paul K. Davis, Principal Researcher, The Rand Corporation; Kenneth R. Mayer, Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison; and Michael O'Hanlon, Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution.

Click the link below to view C-SPAN's coverage of the forum.

Through forums such as this, the John Brademas Center for the Study of Congress - at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service - seeks to advance understanding of the powers, processes and political character of the U.S. Congress among scholars, students pursuing careers in public service, those working on Capitol Hill, and the public. It is named for its founder, the former U.S. Representative from Indiana (1959-81) and President Emeritus of New York University (1981-1992).

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