Health

"Society flies blind when it comes to health care…"

"Society flies blind when it comes to health care…"

In the U.S. and England, the financial bottom line tends to drive decisions about how to value medical treatments within a competitive health system, and reconfigurations and reforms are usually led by administrators and politicians, not by physicians. “To improve the health care system,” argue NYU Wagner Professor John Billings and two fellow scholars writing for the Journal of the American Medical Association, “physicians should take a firm lead: a large portion of the activities most likely to have an impact on improving outcomes and quality are embedded in the care setting provided by physicians interacting directly with patients.” But is it likely that physicians will take the initiative and foster positive-sum competition for health-gain value to patients? For the answer, read the full article by Prof. Billings, Jennifer Dixon, and Cyril Chantler by clicking the link below.

Prof. Billings, Associate Professor of Health Policy and Public Service at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, teaches in the area of health policy. He is principal investigator on numerous projects to assess the performance of the safety net for vulnerable populations and to understand the nature and extent of barriers to optimal health for vulnerable populations. Much of his work has involved analysis of patterns of hospital admission and emergency room visits as a mechanism to evaluate access barriers to outpatient care and to assess the performance of the ambulatory care delivery system. He has also examined the characteristics of high cost Medicaid patients in to help in designing interventions to improve care and outcomes for these patients. Parallel work in the United Kingdom has involved creating an algorithm for the National Health Service to identify patients at risk of future hospital admissions and designing interventions to improve care for these high risk patients. As a founding member of the Foundation for Informed Decision Making, Professor Billings is helping to provide patients with a clearer mechanism for understanding and making informed decisions about a variety of available treatments.

'Nest' Program for Autistic Kids Grows

'Nest' Program for Autistic Kids Grows

Dorothy Siegel of NYU's Institute for Education and Social Policy helped the city Department of Education to create the "Nest" program for autistic children in 2003. According to a May 25, 2007, article in the New York Daily News, this successful program, which puts kids with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the same class with other students, is growing. Come September, it will be available to 200 kids. Once it is implemented across the city, it could benefit as many as 2,000 children.

Founded in 1995, the Institute for Education and Social Policy is a partnership between the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. It conducts scientific research about U.S. education and related social policy issues to help inform educational institutions about the effectiveness of instructional programs, the impact of school reform initiatives, and the relationships between academic achievement, school finance and socio-economic and demographic factors such as poverty, ethnicity and immigration status. It is led by Wagner Professors Amy Ellen Schwartz (director) and Leanna Stiefel (associate director).

To read the article, click below.

'Thinking Outside the Blog' on U.S. Politics and Government

'Thinking Outside the Blog' on U.S. Politics and Government

New blogs and online publications about U.S. domestic policy and political strategy prompted commentary from Washington Post op-ed columnist David Broder � and his words of praise for a thought-provoking article on the health care system written for Democracy: A Journal of Ideas by Jason Furman, a Visiting Scholar at NYU Wagner, a Senior Fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, and former Special Assistant for Economic Policy in the Clinton Administration.

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