Alumni

Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award Goes to Two NYU Wagner Scholars

Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award Goes to Two NYU Wagner Scholars

A distinguished pair of NYU Wagner professors have been named as recipients of New York University's 2012 Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award.

Congratulations to Shankar Prasad, who is adjunct assistant professor of public administration, and Associate Professor Deirdre Royster, who is co-affiliated with the NYU Department of Sociology.

The faculty award recognizes University professors who exemplify the spirit of the late civil rights leader through their scholarship, research, and teaching by making a positive contribution to their students in the classroom and to the greater NYU community.

Professors Prasad and Royster and three other honorees were recognized at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Faculty Award Reception on  February 8 in Pless Hall Lounge. Prasad's research focuses on political learning within immigrant communities across the United States. Royster is the author of "Race and the Invisible Hand: How White Networks Exclude Black Men From Blue-Collar Jobs" (2003).

 

Mayor Bloomberg Announces Help for Nonprofits at NYU Wagner Event

Mayor Bloomberg Announces Help for Nonprofits at NYU Wagner Event

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg

Speaking before about 300 public service leaders at New York University's Kimmel Center, Mayor Michael Bloomberg on April 6, 2009, announced a series of new initiatives to help more than 40,000 nonprofit cultural, health and social service organizations in New York City weather the economic downturn. The event was sponsored by the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, with welcoming words offered by NYU President John Sexton, and with the Mayor introduced and the economic challenges confronting the nonprofit sector framed in opening remarks delivered by NYU Wagner Dean Ellen Schall.

"Almost half a million New Yorkers who make up our nonprofit workforce contribute profoundly to the heartbeat of our city by  helping residents across the five boroughs -- particularly during these trying times," said Mayor Bloomberg. "Whether by training people for jobs, providing access to arts and culture, or building affordable housing, the nonprofit sector is a vital part of the City and our economy. As nonprofits face increasing challenges due to the economic downturn, it's critical that the City take concrete steps to strengthen the sector and help it thrive."

The mayor's initiatives are aimed at helping nonprofit organizations reduce fixed costs through group-purchasing of goods, energy savings, and other strategies, improving the city's contracting procedures, increasing bridge loans, and providing dedicated assistance through nyc.gov - where the initiatives are spelled out in detail -- and the 311 city information hotline.

Dean Schall said, "Mayor Bloomberg has shown unprecedented acknowledgement and support of the vital role that the nonprofit sector plays in New York City. As the dean of the  NYU Graduate School of Public Service, I applaud the Mayor for focusing needed attention on the critical needs of nonprofits, which have been particularly hard hit by current economic conditions. Streamlining the process for nonprofits to contract with the city strengthens the bottom line. Just as important is the Mayor's call for increased collaboration and partnership. NYU Wagner, through its faculty, students , and alumni, is proud to partner with the city in its efforts to maximize the positive impact of the city's nonprofit sector."

Measuring Progress in Reducing Poverty [Video]

Measuring Progress in Reducing Poverty [Video]

C. Nicole Mason, executive director of the Women of Color Poverty Network (WOCPN) at NYU Wagner, delivered opening remarks at a major conference on measuring poverty, held March 29 at the Center for American Progress, and co-hosted by WOPCN and the Half in Ten campaign.

She joined with other national experts as they discussed the challenges of developing poverty benchmarks and indicators for progress, how the new measure can be used in tandem with other statistics to assess shared goals, and how agencies and organizations can collaborate to effectively reduce poverty in the next decade. Congressman Jim McDermott (D-Wisconsin) gave the keynote address.

The event, including Mason's opening remarks, can be seen here [Video].

Pages

Subscribe to Alumni