Alumni

Karen Grepin's New Paper Explores the Impact of HIV-Focused Donor Aid

Karen Grepin's New Paper Explores the Impact of HIV-Focused Donor Aid

A research investigation by NYU Wagner Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy Karen Grépin on the impact of international HIV-focused donor funding on health service delivery will appear in a special issue of the journal Health Affairs. The July thematic issue is devoted to analysis of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, a nine-year-old program of bilateral U.S. assistance to support countries in their battle against HIV/AIDS (and one that has been described as the largest program of  U.S. aid since the Marshall Plan). The Health Affairs volume and its dissemination are funded, in part, by the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator; Merck & Co, Inc.; BD; and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Professor Grépin’s paper is titled “HIV Donor Funding Has Both Boosted And Curbed The Delivery Of Different Non-HIV Health Services In Sub-Saharan Africa."  She will join contributors, thought leaders, and policy makers at a morning briefing in Washington, D.C., on July 10 to mark the issue’s release.

Katherine O'Regan Receives NYU 2010-11 Distinguished Teaching Award

Katherine O'Regan Receives NYU 2010-11 Distinguished Teaching Award

Congratulations to Katherine M. O'Regan, associate professor of public policy extraordinaire here at NYU Wagner! She has been selected as a recipient of the 2010-2011 Distinguished Teaching Award.

The award recipients include a total of six professors from across the university.

Professor O'Regan will be donating half of her esteemed award to the Wagner Experience Fund, established for the first time this year to fund 50 internships for Wagner students this summer.

Past teaching-award recipients at Wagner include Ingrid Gould Ellen, Steven Finkler, and Ellen Schall.

 

Keystone Fellowship on Leadership Selects 18 Fellows

Keystone Fellowship on Leadership Selects 18 Fellows

Sponsored by the UJA-Federation of New York, the COJECO Keystone Fellowship is a new leadership development program grounded in a partnership between COJECO — the central coordinating body of the Russian-speaking Jewish community of New York — and NYU Wagner.

Now, the Keystone Fellowship has announced an inaugural, 18-person cohort of Fellows, representing diverse Jewish activists and the broad array of organizations and affiliations across the Jewish community of New York.

Starting in January, 2015, these outstanding Fellows will have the opportunity to study issues of institutional governance, fiduciary responsibilities, and leadership learning. The year-long Keystone Fellowship will also include an intensive, three-day retreat,  fifteen group sessions, and a weeklong, immersive learning experience in Israel.

NYU Wagner will award the participants an executive graduate certificate upon their successful completion of the Fellowship program.

"In the Jewish world, there is a pressing need for well-trained and thoughtful volunteer leaders to steer our organizations, from synagogues to schools, to those providing social welfare and culture, to those engaging in political action and social justice," said David Elcott, NYU Wagner's Henry and Marilyn Taub Professor of Practice in Public Service and Leadership, and Co-Director of the Dual Degree Program in Jewish Studies. "As the demands and pressures facing Jewish agencies and organizations increase, supporting further advancement of mid-level leader becomes even more urgent."

Details on the Keystone Fellowship  and a list of the new Fellows are available at COJECO.

 

Kovner-Behrman Health Forum Focuses on Coordination of Cancer Care

Kovner-Behrman Health Forum Focuses on Coordination of Cancer Care

Established by NYU Wagner Professor Anthony Kovner in 1996, the annual Kovner-Behrman Health Forum focused on “Coordination of Cancer Care: The Patient Perspective” on April 20, with a discussion featuring Associate Professor Ingrid M. Nembhard of the School of Public Health and the School of Public Management at Yale and Ethan Basch, an oncologist and Director of Cancer Outcomes Research at the University of North Carolina.

Sherry Glied, Dean of NYU Wagner, offered words of welcome, while Professor Kovner set the tone with emotional remarks. Speaking to more than 100 attendees, he recalled his parents’ and brother’s struggle with cancer, and emphasized the life-and-death importance of the evening’s topic for so many, from the standpoint of cancer patients and their loved ones in particular.

The featured guests illuminated the challenging, evolving world of coordinated care in cancer treatment, citing growing interest among healthcare organizations and medical providers in new approaches.

They described pioneering innovations, such as: nurse navigators who help individuals with cancer to coordinate their  treatment; computer tablets for gathering and  sharing knowledge about a patient's diagnosis  and progress across all of his or her caretakers;  performance-based bonus payments for hospitals  that streamline costs through intensive care  coordination and management; and relational  skills building exercises to foster a greater degree  of mutual respect and communication between the patient and providers.

Many of these approaches still require additional study and development, while others are already in use, though not uniformly. The challenge will be to demonstrate their value and bring the most promising ones to scale. The 19th annual Kovner-Behrman Health Forum, in focusing on the issue of care coordination, marked an important step in this direction.

“The current model of care delivery does not have the patient at its center,” lamented Dr. Basch. But he, and Professor Nembhard, both described a rising level of interest in care coordination, notable instances of success around the country, and even, as Basch put it, a nascent “cultural change to bring the patient to the center of care.”

Kristof responds! NYT columnist answers critique from Wagner's own Dave Algoso

Kristof responds! NYT columnist answers critique from Wagner's own Dave Algoso

On Friday, 10/29, Nicholas Kristof responded to some critiques of his column in last Sunday's New York Times Magazine, including one penned by Wagner student Dave Algoso for Foreign Policy. Kristof writes, "My Sunday magazine piece a week ago on young Americans engaging in do-it-yourself foreign aid projects sparked a good bit of reaction, including some thoughtful criticisms. You can read the comments below the previous blog post to get a flavor. Let me try to address some of the complaints."

Read the rest of his response

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