Academics

"Beyond the Wal-Martization of Immigration"

"Beyond the Wal-Martization of Immigration"

In a guest commentary, NYU Wagner Professor Natasha Iskander and fellow researcher Nichola Lowe, of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, writes on the role scholars can play in reshaping the political dialogue and debate about immigration and its impact on the national economy. The piece is hosted by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill. (See, too, a recent study coauthored by Iskander, entitled "Hidden Talent: Skill Formation and Labor Market Incorporation of Latino Immigrants in the United States.")

On Friday, April 8, 2011, meanwhile, Professor Iskander visited the World Bank in Washington, D.C., to deliver a lecture about her recently published book, Creative State: Forty Years of Migration and Development Policy in Morocco and Mexico

"From Local to Global: Extrapolating Experiments"

"From Local to Global: Extrapolating Experiments"

NYU Wagner Associate Professor of Public Policy Rajeev Dahejia, an economist, has posted an original essay stimulated by the phenomenal growth of randomized control trials (RCTs) for impact evaluations in international development and aid interventions. As he writes –  for the International Growth Centre blog – “questions persist about what the results of an RCT in one context can tell us about the probable results of similar programme implemented in another context." We invite you to read and consider his blog entry.

 

"Portfolios of the Poor," co-authored by Prof. Jonathan Morduch, Helped Inspire a New App to Address Income Volatility: NY Times Magazine

"Portfolios of the Poor," co-authored by Prof. Jonathan Morduch, Helped Inspire a New App to Address Income Volatility: NY Times Magazine

“Want A Steady Income? There’s an App for That,” a piece published Sunday, May 3, in The New York Times Magazine, focuses on a Silicon Valley app-in-development partly inspired by Portfolios of the Poor: How the World’s Poor Live on $2 a Day, the groundbreaking book (Princeton University Press, 2009) written by NYU Wagner Professor of Public Policy and Economics Jonathan Morduch, NYU Wagner PhD Daryl Collins, and two others. The anticipated app is designed to help households manage what has been called America's “hidden inequality” – the profound stresses and disruptions income volatility can cause.

Professor Morduch’s research centers on microfinance, social investment, and the economics of poverty. He is the Executive Director and Founder of the Financial Access Initiative (FAI). His current “U.S. Financial Diaries” project examines how income volatility affects low- and moderate-income U.S. families.

"The Hidden Lives of America’s Poor and Middle Class”

"The Hidden Lives of America’s Poor and Middle Class”

Jonathan Morduch, Professor of Public Policy and Economics at NYU Wagner, has co-written an article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, describing the U.S. Financial Diaries project he leads. The ongoing project deeply explores the financial lives of individual American families of lower and middle income levels. It illuminates, in part, the phenomenon of unsteady household income and expenses, and how this volatility can hamper the ability of working families to gain economic stability and upward mobility. At the same time, the project shows that financial products, programs and policies created to help working households are sometimes ill-suited to the day-to-day challenges these households actually face – whether they are living below or well above the poverty line.

Professor Morduch is Executive Director the Financial Access Initiative, a consortium of researchers focused on the most pressing issues of financial inclusion in the U.S. and in developing countries. He created the U.S. Financial Diaries project with colleagues Rachel Schneider – with whom he co-authored the article – and NYU Wagner graduate Daryl Collins (PhD, 2010).

2011 'State of the Borough' Address Spotlights Capstone Program

2011 'State of the Borough' Address Spotlights Capstone Program

The Capstone Program at NYU Wagner came in for high praise in the State of the Borough address delivered February 24, 2011, by Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz, Jr.

"In October," he stated, "New York University's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service chose the Kingsbridge Armory for a study through its highly competitive Capstone Program. The Capstone Program is very well-respected, so much so that multiple city agencies have used its services to design and plan major projects. For several months, Capstone has been providing our task force with valuable support as we move forward on developing a new plan for the Armory.

"The report of this task force must be the cornerstone of a new RFP, and I invite the Mayor to join with me to responsibly develop the K ingsbridge Armory. Responsible development means that whatever plan we choose has a direct positive impact on all citizens...." said Diaz.

The Capstone Program is learning in action. Part of the core curriculum of the MPA and MUP programs at Wagner, it provides students with both a critical learning experience and an opportunity to perform a public service. Over the course of an academic year, students work in teams, either to address challenges and identify opportunities for a client organization or to conduct research on a pressing social question. Ultimately, Capstone contributes not only to the students' education, but also to the public good.

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