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Aruba's Prime Minister Mike Eman Shows Path to a Sustainable Future

Aruba's Prime Minister Mike Eman Shows Path to a Sustainable Future

NYU Wagner students were treated to a fascinating account of Aruba's efforts to link economic growth and social development in sustainable ways -- a presentation delivered at NYU Wagner by none other than the island's Prime Minister, Mike Eman.

Prime Minister Eman, who is serving his second term, noted that Aruba, with a population of 100,000, began to develop its structural reforms even before the worldwide financial bubble burst in 2007-'08. In the prior two decades, Aruba had struggled with socio-economic stressors of its own despite the tremendous growth of its tourism industry.

To address this striking disconnect, Mr. Eman and his political party initiated Social Dialogues to encourage greater public involvement across communities and sectors in government planning. These and other efforts brought about the reshaping of the streetscape, the refurbishment of older buildings, and renewed emphasis on strengthening schools, healthcare, and conditions for the elderly. Overall, the work-in-progress contributes to the island's general welfare and "happiness," even drawing praise from environmentalists Al Gore, Richard Branson, and many others. Mr. Eman went from his Wagner visit of March 26 to an engineering society gathering in Manhattan where he accepted an award on behalf of the new battery-fueled trolley system in Aruba -- a notable advance in clean, safe urban transit.

"In 2008, the world was surprised when in so many cases greed had taken over and the public interest was not taken into account," said Mr. Eman. However, he said, Aruba's experiences suggest that while economic growth is critical, it cannot be de-coupled from democratic values, the environment, and social development -- or the result will be a city, a country, or indeed a world which is neither truly happy nor sustainable.

Community Reflection

Community Reflection

The grand jury decisions in the police killings of Michael Brown of Ferguson, MO., and Eric Garner of Staten Island, NY, were the catalysts for insights, reflections, and next-step brainstorming as the NYU Wagner community came together for an open-mike forum on December 9 facilitated by Wagner students Simone Andrews and Quintin Haynes.

The conversation among nearly 100 students, staff, and faculty reflected not only the deep emotions that many have voiced on the New York University campus and across the country at demonstrations, die-ins, and tributes to the victims and their families, but an opportunity to discuss policy solutions, as well.

Haynes said he was pleased that so many of Wagner’s faculty and staff were present at the gathering, engendering a collaborative spirit with students.

In recent weeks, NYU Wagner’s Black Student Association (BSA) released a letter to the Ferguson City Council, offering recommendations for improving police/community relations, along with an open letter to the Wagner community underscoring the need for dialogue aimed at bringing about change that matters.

The BSA has been holding a series of “Tea Talks” on topics such as Ferguson’s rippling effect throughout America, and the obstacles to collaboration and mutual support facing us all.

The continuing outcry has a strong resonance for many people within the Wagner community, and events are now being scheduled for the spring semester to continue the conversation.

Influential Chinese Delegation Visits NYU Wagner on U.S. Study Tour

Influential Chinese Delegation Visits NYU Wagner on U.S. Study Tour

An influential Chinese delegation made NYU Wagner an extended stop on its U.S. study tour on Sept. 25, spending more than two hours at the school and hearing faculty discuss their research world cities, aging populations, and healthcare.

The 20 delegates of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) listened as Professor Victor Rodwin explained his comparative studies focused on the health of older adults in some of the world’s biggest cities. Professor Zhan Guo described his research on the built landscape and walkability in fast-growing Chinese urban areas.

Both research presentations drew a lively question-and-answer period, with some delegates asking about the role of the family in taking care of aging relatives, and taking part in a discussion of cultural differences between cities such as Tokyo, Hong Kong, and New York.

The CPPCC delegates left with a host of printed materials about NYU Wagner, and some promised to spread the word about the school’s vital role in educating the next generation of global public service leaders in the nonprofit, governmental, and private sectors.

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