Angela Hendrix Terry
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Administration

Angela Hendrix Terry is an independent consultant to nonprofit and government organizations. Her practice is primarily focused on issues of change and leadership. Ms. Terry assists leaders in clarifying mission, task and role; building collaborative work groups to facilitate change; and developing systems which align with change efforts. She brings her knowledge of group process and action learning to this work to optimize the effectiveness of change initiatives and collaborative efforts .

Prior to her consulting work, Ms. Terry spent over 20 years in leadership positions that exposed her to innovative leaders as well as challenging projects. She served as Chief of Staff at the New York City Economic Development Corporation during the consolidation of several economic development agencies in the early '90s and as Special Assistant to the Dean of NYU's Wagner Graduate School of Public Service during key leadership changes at the university and at the school. Ms. Terry also managed the NYC Department of Juvenile Justice's planning process for two new state-of-the-art juvenile facilities and served as part of the implementation team for a national demonstration project, NYC City Volunteer Corp, focused on urban youth.

Ms. Terry holds a Masters of Art in Political Science from Northwestern University. She also received a post-graduate certificate in Organizational Consultation and Development from the William Alanson White Institute where she also serves as a faculty member of the Organizational Program. Ms. Terry also serves as adjunct faculty at NYU Wagner where she co-teaches Reflective Practice and Developing Management Skills.

Semester Course
Fall 2012 CAP-GP.0001.001 Capstone Advanced Team Session
The goal of the Capstone Advanced Teamwork Seminar is to enhance students’ teamwork skills. It is designed to build on previous training on teamwork in a required core course, Managing Public Service Organizations.

This required Capstone seminar will focus on advancing students’ understanding and skills in four areas of teamwork: (a) diversity, (b) conflict, (c) roles, and (d) team process.
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Spring 2009 PADM-GP.1901.001 Reflective Practice: Learning from Work

“Research on leader development suggests that reflection, especially for highly successful action-oriented leaders and managers, is counter-intuitive, requires disciplined and intentional practice to become a solid part of a leader’s development strategy, and is critical to success.” The goal of this course is to provide the basis on which students can begin to build the tools to become disciplined and intentional reflective practitioners. To this end, we will explore:

• the issues of self at work, including ways of paying attention to the individual, small group, and large group dynamics of organizational life;
• the concept of building theory from practice; and
• the ways to create space for reflection.

Students are expected to be working or interning at an organization during the semester they are taking this course.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 PADM-GP.1901.001 Reflective Practice: Learning from Work

“Research on leader development suggests that reflection, especially for highly successful action-oriented leaders and managers, is counter-intuitive, requires disciplined and intentional practice to become a solid part of a leader’s development strategy, and is critical to success.” The goal of this course is to provide the basis on which students can begin to build the tools to become disciplined and intentional reflective practitioners. To this end, we will explore:

• the issues of self at work, including ways of paying attention to the individual, small group, and large group dynamics of organizational life;
• the concept of building theory from practice; and
• the ways to create space for reflection.

Students are expected to be working or interning at an organization during the semester they are taking this course.


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Spring 2008 CAP-GP.0001.001 Foundations of Nonprofit Management

The Wagner School prepares students for the real – sometimes messy, always complex – world of public service. To achieve this mission, we are dedicated to creating opportunities for students to discover the interrelationships of conceptual theory, practical realities, and individual career goals. This course encourages students to develop career planning skills through concentrated research, written assignments, and large group discussions, map an intended career field and develop a broad understanding of the various roles and organizations that influence that field, and understand the interconnections among diverse public service issues and between Wagner’s various programs.


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