Angela Glover Blackwell

Adjunct Associate Professor of Urban Planning

Angela Glover Blackwell is an Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Service at the NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Founder and CEO of PolicyLink. Founded in 1999, PolicyLink has become a leading voice in the movement to use public policy to improve access and opportunity for all low-income people and communities of color, particularly in the areas of health, housing, transportation, education, and infrastructure.

Blackwell previously served as Senior Vice President at the Rockefeller Foundation, where she oversaw the foundation’s domestic and cultural divisions. A lawyer by training, she gained national recognition as founder of the Oakland (CA) Urban Strategies Council, where she pioneered new approaches to neighborhood revitalization. From 1977 to 1987, Blackwell was a partner at Public Advocates. She currently serves on President Obama’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans.

Blackwell is the co-author of Uncommon Common Ground: Race and America’s Future and contributed to Ending Poverty in America: How to Restore the American Dream and The Covenant with Black America. In 2013, Blackwell and PolicyLink collaborated with the Center for American Progress to write and release All In Nation: An America that Works for All.

Blackwell earned a B.A. from Howard University and a law degree from the University of California, Berkeley.

As America bolts toward becoming a majority people of color nation, dozens of cities are already there. This urban transformation is occurring against the backdrop of rising inequality and persistent racial inequity. The resulting friction sometimes overshadows, and in the long run threatens to undermine, the incredible opportunities afforded by the resurgence of cities. To maintain their competitive advantage, cities will have to address the following tough questions:

• Who benefits from the investments?

• Who gets to live in dense neighborhoods rich in culture and opportunity?

• How do we open up opportunity to everyone?

To answer these questions, we need fresh thinking about job creation, education, housing, economic development and everything that makes cities tick. At the same time, we need to lift up groundbreaking local efforts that are beginning to fuse the achievement of racial equity and the creation of 21st century cities. This course examines how cities can meet these challenges through policy interventions.

 

 

Download Syllabus

American cities are comprised of residents from a great diversity of nations, cultures, religions, and political philosophies. Consequently, conflicts surrounding race, ethnicity, class, and gender are often at the center of disputes about the use of public space and the allocation of city resources. This course examines the patterns of racial‐ethnic, class, and gender inequality in American cities. We shall address how these inequalities emerge, how they are perpetuated, and the role of public policy in addressing these social problems.

Download Syllabus

As America bolts toward becoming a majority people of color nation, dozens of cities are already there. This urban transformation is occurring against the backdrop of rising inequality and persistent racial inequity. The resulting friction sometimes overshadows, and in the long run threatens to undermine, the incredible opportunities afforded by the resurgence of cities. To maintain their competitive advantage, cities will have to address the following tough questions:

• Who benefits from the investments?

• Who gets to live in dense neighborhoods rich in culture and opportunity?

• How do we open up opportunity to everyone?

To answer these questions, we need fresh thinking about job creation, education, housing, economic development and everything that makes cities tick. At the same time, we need to lift up groundbreaking local efforts that are beginning to fuse the achievement of racial equity and the creation of 21st century cities. This course examines how cities can meet these challenges through policy interventions.

 

 

Download Syllabus