Aram Hur

Postdoctoral Fellow

The Puck Building
295 Lafayette Street
Room 3004
New York, NY 10012
By appointment
Aram Hur

Aram Hur is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wagner School of Public Service. Her research lies at the intersection of comparative and international politics, with a focus on East Asia. She is interested in how identity politics shapes the way new or marginalized citizens integrate into democracies: how they develop a sense of democratic responsibility, whether and how they participate politically, and what that means for the resulting health of democracies.

Dr. Hur was selected by the Office of the Provost as a Faculty Fellow in NYU’s Postdoctoral and Transition Program for Academic Diversity in 2015. At Wagner, she is currently finishing her first book manuscript titled The Dutiful Citizen: How Nationalism Shapes Moral Obligations to the State, as well as ongoing projects on the political integration of North Korean refugees, national minorities, and immigrants.

She received her Ph.D. in Politics from Princeton University, M.P.P. from the Harvard Kennedy School, and B.A. from Stanford University.

Continuation CAP-GP.3148. As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience in which they are able to experience first-hand the full research experience. Under the guidance of an experienced faculty member, students will develop a research question, conduct a literature review, develop hypotheses, find relevant datasets, run analyses and write up findings. Students will also enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork.

Download Syllabus

Why do individuals choose to participate in politics and public life? This is an important question, since much of public policy depends on direct or indirect citizen support in the form of compliance, engagement, or collective action. Without it, even sound policies can fail to be broadly implemented. This course provides a “bottom up” view by exploring the motivations and constraints behind various kinds of civic engagement. We will cover voting, political mobilization, cooperation with the state, and the role of public opinion in both the American and international policy contexts. We will primarily read book chapters and articles in the field of political science, but the ramifications of our discussions will extend far beyond the field of politics and should be useful to a broad range of students interested in policy-making, implementation, and social change.

Download Syllabus

Couples with CAP-GP.3149. As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year conducting research on a pressing social question.  Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience in which they are able to experience first-hand the full research experience.  Under the guidance of an experienced faculty member, students will develop a research question,  conduct a literature review, develop hypotheses, find relevant datasets, run analyses and write up findings.  Students will also enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork.  

Download Syllabus

The purpose of the course is to deepen students’ understanding of the way in which public policy and political realities interact in American government at the national, state, and local levels: how political pressures limit policy choices, how policy choices in turn reshape politics, and how policymakers can function in the interplay of competing forces. The theme explored is how public officials balance concerns for substantive policy objectives, institutional politics and elective politics in order to achieve change. The nature of key legislative and executive institutional objectives and roles is examined. In addition, attention is given to the role of policy analysis and analysts in shaping policy decisions, seeking to identify their potential for positive impact and their limitations in the political process.

A second goal of the course is to sharpen students’ ability to think and write like professional policy analysts. Students will be asked to apply both policy analysis framework and political perspective to the issues under discussion.

Download Syllabus

Couples with CAP-GP.3149. As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year conducting research on a pressing social question.  Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience in which they are able to experience first-hand the full research experience.  Under the guidance of an experienced faculty member, students will develop a research question,  conduct a literature review, develop hypotheses, find relevant datasets, run analyses and write up findings.  Students will also enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork.  

Download Syllabus

Why do individuals choose to participate in politics and public life? This is an important question, since much of public policy depends on direct or indirect citizen support in the form of compliance, engagement, or collective action. Without it, even sound policies can fail to be broadly implemented. This course provides a “bottom up” view by exploring the motivations and constraints behind various kinds of civic engagement. We will cover voting, political mobilization, cooperation with the state, and the role of public opinion in both the American and international policy contexts. We will primarily read book chapters and articles in the field of political science, but the ramifications of our discussions will extend far beyond the field of politics and should be useful to a broad range of students interested in policy-making, implementation, and social change.

Download Syllabus

Couples with CAP-GP.3149. As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year conducting research on a pressing social question.  Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience in which they are able to experience first-hand the full research experience.  Under the guidance of an experienced faculty member, students will develop a research question,  conduct a literature review, develop hypotheses, find relevant datasets, run analyses and write up findings.  Students will also enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork.  

Download Syllabus

2017

Abstract

The duty to vote is a strong predictor of turnout, but little is known of its source, leaving much ambiguity around the nature of the motivation. This article shows that a powerful pathway lies in the ethical commitment many individuals feel to their nations. When the state is seen as an extension of one's national community, this national obligation is politicized toward state affairs, including the duty to vote. Conversely, when this linkage is weak or absent, an intrinsic duty to vote is weakened. By revising a key assumption in the traditional calculus of voting, I derive a statistical model to identify a nation-based, intrinsic duty to vote. The model is tested in Germany, where different experiences with unification in the East versus West yield contrasting predictions on an intrinsic duty to vote. The findings suggest new strategies for get-out-the-vote efforts to target the nationalistic source of the duty to vote.

2013

Abstract

The Voting and Registration Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS) employs a large sample size and has a very high response rate, and thus is often regarded as the gold standard among turnout surveys. In 2008, however, the CPS inaccurately estimated that presidential turnout had undergone a small decrease from 2004. We show that growing nonresponse plus a long-standing but idiosyncratic Census coding decision was responsible. We suggest that to cope with nonresponse and overreporting, users of the Voting Supplement sample should weight it to reflect actual state vote counts.

2011

Abstract

Democratic governments rely on participation by all citizens for balanced and equitable election outcomes. What maintains voter turnout, this central aspect of democratic health? Civic duty is a powerful force in getting citizens to the polls, and yet it has often been misunderstood or neglected in empirical studies. By contrast, political theory has developed a rich literature on the obligations of democratic citizens. We show that a new statistical model based on political theorists’ analysis ofduty substantially improves the understanding of turnout in Japan and South Korea.