Caitlyn T Brazill

Adjunct Associate Professor of Urban Planning

Caitlyn Brazill

Caitlyn Brazill is the Vice President for Strategic Partnerships at CAMBA, where she is responsible for resource development, communications and government affairs. Her work supports a $100-million organization with 150 human service programs reaching 45,000 low and moderate income New Yorkers each year. Prior to joining CAMBA, Caitlyn worked in the non-profit and government sectors in New York City for more than 10 years, including as Director of Policy and Communications at NYU’s Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy and as Director of Research and Policy at the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs' Office of Financial Empowerment. She has expertise in program evaluation and design, qualitative and quantitative research, policy advocacy, organizational development, and has worked across diverse policy domains, including asset building and financial services, workforce and youth development, child welfare and income support. She has been an adjunct professor at New York University since 2005 and has lectured on statistics, wealth inequality and poverty. Caitlyn earned her B.A. in Sociology from the State University of New York at Albany and her M.P.A at NYU's Wagner School of Public Service. Caitlyn lives in Brooklyn with her husband and her daughter, Haliy.

U.S. wealth inequality has steadily risen since the 1970s, despite efforts to help low-wealth households build assets. This course will examine how public policy and private philanthropic efforts have attempted to boost the accumulation of assets - namely land, homes, investments—among lower-income households.

The course will review the drivers of growing inequality, the successes and failures of the asset-building movement, changes in the US economic context and how anti-poverty policy has and has not changed as a result. We will place the current U.S. situation in context, both historically and globally. The course will consider how effective policy addresses the factors undermining asset formation such as historic discrimination, predatory practices, consumer psychology and financial product availability. The course, which is participatory and interactive, will conclude with students conceptualizing their own policies (public or private) to address wealth inequality.

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U.S. wealth inequality has steadily risen since the 1970s, despite efforts to help low-wealth households build assets. This course will examine how public policy and private philanthropic efforts have attempted to boost the accumulation of assets - namely land, homes, investments—among lower-income households.

The course will review the drivers of growing inequality, the successes and failures of the asset-building movement, changes in the US economic context and how anti-poverty policy has and has not changed as a result. We will place the current U.S. situation in context, both historically and globally. The course will consider how effective policy addresses the factors undermining asset formation such as historic discrimination, predatory practices, consumer psychology and financial product availability. The course, which is participatory and interactive, will conclude with students conceptualizing their own policies (public or private) to address wealth inequality.

Download Syllabus

2010

Abstract

This article uses the Advocacy Coalition Framework to identify the stakeholders and their coalitions in the arena of after-school policy, which drew much new attention beginning in the early 1990s in many American cities. Using evidence from case studies in five cities, we show how the framework can be extended beyond stakeholder analysis to include identification of core and secondary value conflicts and of opportunities for policy analysis to help strengthen coalitions and pressures for change. Coalitions in each of the cities differ over core values relating to the purposes of after-school programs (academics versus “fun”), but policy analysts can promote common goals by developing options to deal with the secondary conflicts over the relative importance of facilities versus program content, the modes of collaboration between public schools and community based organizations, and the incentives for public school teachers to engage in staffing after-school programs.

2009

Abstract

This article uses the Advocacy Coalition Framework to identify the stakeholders and their coalitions in the arena of after-school policy, which drew much new attention beginning in the early 1990s in many American cities. Using evidence from case studies in five cities, we show how the framework can be extended beyond stakeholder analysis to include identification of core and secondary value conflicts and of opportunities for policy analysis to help strengthen coalitions and pressures for change. Coalitions in each of the cities differ over core values relating to the purposes of after-school programs (academics versus "fun"), but policy analysts can promote common goals by developing options to deal with the secondary conflicts over the relative importance of facilities versus program content, the modes of collaboration between public schools and community based organizations, and the incentives for public school teachers to engage in staffing after-school programs.

Faculty Publication
Efforts to Improve Public Policy and Programs Through Improved "Data Practice": Experiences in Fifteen Distressed American Cities"
Weitzman, B.C., Silver, D. & Brazill, C.
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