Natasha Strassfeld

Associated Assistant Professor of Public Service, NYU Wagner; Assistant Professor of Special Education, NYU Steinhardt

Natasha Strassfeld

Natasha Wilson is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NYU’s Wagner School of Public Service. Her research has a primary focus on parental involvement in the special education accommodations process, disproportionate representation, and education policy. At Wagner, she teaches Poverty, Inequality, and Policy, and Law for the Education Policymaker.

Her current research examines how federal legislation mandating parental involvement during the special education accommodations process is fulfilled nationally. Her other current research examines under- and over-representation of minority students in special education.

Dr. Wilson was selected to participate as a faculty fellow in NYU's Postdoctoral and Transition Program for Academic Diversity [PTP-AD] for the years 2013-2016. Previously, she represented children and families as an attorney at Legal Aid of Cleveland and Legal Aid of Milwaukee. She is also a previous recipient of funded fellowship grants from the U.S. Department of Education and the American Bar Association.

Dr. Wilson holds a J.D. degree from University of Wisconsin School of Law, and a Ph.D. in Special Education from Penn State University.

This course aims to provide an understanding of law and how it shapes and influences practices in K-12 public schools. This course covers seminal education case law (i.e. judicial opinion), legislation, and regulation from the U.S. Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education to key pieces of legislation such as The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Title I), the Individuals with Disabilities with Education Act, and The No Child Left Behind Act, to major federal agency initiatives such as Race to the Top as we explore the ever-shifting education and legal landscapes that impact our nation’s students. Course participants will gain practical skills that help them understand how major educational policy has been expressed through statutory, regulatory, and case law. We will also explore law and regulatory policy through case study analysis with various federal and state agencies (e.g., U.S. Department of Education, NYC Department of Education), and seminar participants will learn how to access case law, statutory law, and federal and state regulations using legal databases such as LexisNexis, Westlaw, and the Legal Information Institute. 

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This course examines the nature and extent of poverty primarily in the U.S. but with a comparative perspective (developed countries in Europe). To start, this course will focus on how poverty is defined and measured. It will proceed to explore how conceptions of poverty are socially constructed and historically bounded; examine what the causes and consequences of poverty are and discuss how these are complex and interwoven; and show how people can experience poverty at different points in their life course—some groups experiencing poverty more so than others. This course will discuss the role of labor markets, family structure and social organization in shaping poverty. And finally, it will explore how social policies seek to ameliorate poverty and other forms of social disadvantage throughout the life course. But when thinking about how ‘successful’ social policies are at alleviating poverty, this course will demonstrate that ‘success’ is actually influenced by the conceptions of poverty adopted by policymakers in the first place.

Download Syllabus

This course examines the nature and extent of poverty primarily in the U.S. but with a comparative perspective (developed countries in Europe). To start, this course will focus on how poverty is defined and measured. It will proceed to explore how conceptions of poverty are socially constructed and historically bounded; examine what the causes and consequences of poverty are and discuss how these are complex and interwoven; and show how people can experience poverty at different points in their life course—some groups experiencing poverty more so than others. This course will discuss the role of labor markets, family structure and social organization in shaping poverty. And finally, it will explore how social policies seek to ameliorate poverty and other forms of social disadvantage throughout the life course. But when thinking about how ‘successful’ social policies are at alleviating poverty, this course will demonstrate that ‘success’ is actually influenced by the conceptions of poverty adopted by policymakers in the first place.

Download Syllabus

This course aims to provide an understanding of law and how it shapes and influences practices in K-12 public schools. This course covers seminal education case law (i.e. judicial opinion), legislation, and regulation from the U.S. Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education to key pieces of legislation such as The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Title I), the Individuals with Disabilities with Education Act, and The No Child Left Behind Act, to major federal agency initiatives such as Race to the Top as we explore the ever-shifting education and legal landscapes that impact our nation’s students. Course participants will gain practical skills that help them understand how major educational policy has been expressed through statutory, regulatory, and case law. We will also explore law and regulatory policy through case study analysis with various federal and state agencies (e.g., U.S. Department of Education, NYC Department of Education), and seminar participants will learn how to access case law, statutory law, and federal and state regulations using legal databases such as LexisNexis, Westlaw, and the Legal Information Institute. 

Download Syllabus