Cities

Robert Moses and the Modern City: The Transformation of New York

Robert Moses and the Modern City: The Transformation of New York
W.W. Norton.

Ballon, H. & Jackson, K.T. eds.
01/01/2007

"We are rebuilding New York, not dispersing and abandoning it": Robert Moses saw himself on a rescue mission to save the city from obsolescence, decentralization, and decline. His vast building program aimed to modernize urban infrastructure, expand the public realm with extensive recreational facilities, remove blight, and make the city more livable for the middle class. This book offers a fresh look at the physical transformation of New York during Moses’s nearly forty-year reign over city building from 1934 to 1968. It is hard to imagine that anyone will ever have the same impact on New York as did Robert Moses. In his various roles in city and state government, he reshaped the fabric of the city, and his legacy continues to touch the lives of all New Yorkers. Revered for most of his life, he is now one of the most controversial figures in the city’s history. Robert Moses and the Modern City is the first major publication devoted to him since Robert Caro’s damning 1974 biography, The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York. In these pages eight short essays by leading scholars of urban history provide a revised perspective; stunning new photographs offer the first visual record of Moses’s far-reaching building program as it stands today; and a comprehensive catalog of his works is illustrated with a wealth of archival records: photographs of buildings, neighborhoods, and landscapes, of parks, pools, and playgrounds, of demolished neighborhoods and replacement housing and urban renewal projects, of bridges and highways; renderings of rejected designs and controversial projects that were defeated; and views of spectacular models that have not been seen since Moses made them for promotional purposes. Robert Moses and the Modern City captures research undertaken in the last three decades and will stimulate a new round of debate.

What Do Business Improvement Districts Do for Property Owners?

What Do Business Improvement Districts Do for Property Owners?
Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Taxation, p431-437, 7p

Schwartz, A.E., Ellen, I.G. & Meltzer, R.
01/01/2007

The article discusses the implication of business improvement districts (BIDS) to property owners in the U.S. The scheme first arrived in the country in mid-1970s when urban centers were losing both residents and businesses to suburbs. Such scheme is beneficial to companies because it delivers fair basic services such as security, maintenance, marketing and capital improvements.

Pennsylvania’s “Key” to Successful High Speed Rail

Pennsylvania’s “Key” to Successful High Speed Rail
New York Transportation Journal (NYTJ) 10, 1, Fall 2006, 4-5 .

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
09/01/2006

Many countries have or will soon deploy new high-speed rail (HSR) (separate right-of-way (ROW) using technologies that allow speeds over 200 mph) or Maglev (separate ROW using magnetic levitation technologies allowing speeds beyond 300 mph). In the United States, however, though Congress first authorized studies aimed at deploying HSR in 1965, and despite at least 17 different efforts (some with multiple attempts), over the past 40 years nearly all HSR projects have failed to progress. Further, the two which do exist - the Empire Corridor (between New York City and Albany, NY) and Northeast Corridor (NEC) - fall far short of speeds and performance levels elsewhere.
Last year, the Rudin Center completed a study, funded by the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI), aimed at identifying key elements for successful US HSR outcomes. The resulting report, described in NYTJ (Spring 2005), summarized US HSR legislative
history and developed in-depth case studies for Florida, the Pacific Northwest, and California. This year, MTI funded the Center to develop three more cases - the Chicago Hub, the NEC, and the Keystone Corridor. The following discussion is derived from the Keystone case which, along with the others is undergoing peer review. As one of the few cases where HSR has been (or is about to be) implemented in the United States, the Keystone holds important lessons for future efforts.

Do Good High Schools Produce Good College Students? Early Evidence From New York City

Do Good High Schools Produce Good College Students? Early Evidence From New York City
In Advances in Applied Microeconomics, Volume 14, Improving School Accountability: Check-Ups or Choice, edited by T. J. Gronberg and D.W. Jansen,

Schwartz, A.E & Bel Hadj Amor, H. & Stiefel, L.
06/12/2006

We examine variation in high school and college outcomes across New York City public high schools. Using data on 80,000 students who entered high school in 1998 and following them into the City University of New York, we investigate whether schools that produce successful high school students also produce successful college students. We also explore differences in performance across sex, race, and immigration, and we briefly explore selection issues. Specifically, we estimate student-level regressions with school fixed effects, controlling for student characteristics, to identify better and worse performing schools based on state mandated exams, graduation, and college performance.

Recent Trends in the Availability and Affordability of Housing in New York City

Recent Trends in the Availability and Affordability of Housing in New York City
State of New York City's Housing and Neighborhoods Report, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, New York University, June

Voicu, I. & Gedal, M.
06/01/2006

A broad range of interests - from affordable housing advocates to businesses worried about their workforce - are increasingly concerned that housing affordability in the City is declining rapidly, and that at least one of the causes of that decline is a shortage of housing in the City. In this chapter we use the most recent data from the 2005 New York City Housing and Vacancy Survey (HVS) to assess these concerns. First, we examine changes in affordability over the last three years, and do find a striking decrease in the number of units that are affordable to lower-income City residents. Second, we analyze the balance between the demand for, and supply of, housing in the City by looking at the extent to which the housing stock has grown relative to changes in population in recent years. After looking at those trends, we offer a snapshot assessment of the size of the
imbalance between housing demand and supply as of 2005.

Is there a Nativity Gap? New Evidence on the Academic Performance of Immigrant Students

Is there a Nativity Gap? New Evidence on the Academic Performance of Immigrant Students
Education Finance and Policy. Vol. 1, No. 1, Pages 17-49. March 29,

Schwartz, A.E. & Stiefel, L.
03/29/2006

Public schools across the United States are educating an increasing number and diversity of immigrant students. Unfortunately, little is known about their performance relative to native-born students and the extent to which the "nativity gap" might be explained by school and demographic characteristics. This article takes a step toward filling that void using data from New York City where 17 percent of elementary and middle school students are immigrants. We explore disparities in performance between foreign-born and native-born students on reading and math tests in three ways�using levels (unadjusted scores), "value-added" scores (adjusted for prior performance), and an education production function. While unadjusted levels and value-added measures often indicate superior performance among immigrants, disparities are substantially explained by student and school characteristics. Further, while the nativity gap differs for students from different world regions, disparities are considerably diminished in fully specified models. We conclude with implications for urban schools in the United States.

Growing Older in World Cities: New York, Paris, London and Tokyo

Growing Older in World Cities: New York, Paris, London and Tokyo
Edited with Michael Gusmano. Nashville Tn: Vanderbuilt University Press,

Rodwin, V.G.
02/01/2006

Population aging often provokes fears of impending social security deficits, uncontrollable medical expenditures, and transformations in living arrangements, but public policy could also stimulate social innovations. These issues are typically studied at the national level; yet they must be resolved where most people live—in diverse neighborhoods in cities. New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo are the four largest cities among the wealthiest, most developed nations of the world. The essays commissioned for this volume compare what it is like to grow older in these cities with respect to health care, quality of life, housing, and long-term care. The contributors look beyond aggregate national data to highlight the importance of how local authorities implement policies.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Winter 2006, Vol. 9, No. 2.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Sterman, B.P., (eds).
02/01/2006

This issue contains an interview with Urban Designer and Architect Jan Gehl by Janette Sadik-Khan, Senior Vice President of Parson Brinckerhoff and President of Company 39. Also included is an article focusing on developing Nassau County, as well as a piece highlighting current Rudin Center research on "Pedestrian and Bicyclist Standards and Innovations in Large Central Cities."

Inconsistencies in Place Definition: How Different Operational Place Definitions Affect Estimates of Adolescent Smoking and Drinking Risk

Inconsistencies in Place Definition: How Different Operational Place Definitions Affect Estimates of Adolescent Smoking and Drinking Risk
Health and Place, Vol. 13, No. 2.

Brady, J. & Weitzman, B.C.
01/15/2006

We find that estimates of the prevalence of teenage smoking and drinking in "urban," "suburban," and "rural" areas vary with different definitions of these types of geographic units. Given the salience of youth risk behavior to the public debate, we urge researchers to purposefully choose their definitions of geographic areas and to be explicit about those choices.

New York City: IN THE 21st CENTURY

New York City: IN THE 21st CENTURY
Economic Development Journal, Spring 2006, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p7-16, 10p.

Moss, M. L.
01/01/2006

The article reflects on the role of New York City in the 21st century which includes bringing people together with other people to generate the information and products that are then sold around the world. It also presents a brief history of the city in becoming a leading city in the global economy. It also discusses the economic and technological innovations the city had undertaken to become a leading city and the reforms it is planning to implement to maintain its status.

Pages

Subscribe to Cities