Education

All Schools are not Created Equal: Difference in Learning Environment in Small and Large High Schools

All Schools are not Created Equal: Difference in Learning Environment in Small and Large High Schools
Schwartz, A.E., Stiefel, L. & Wiswall, M. (Forthcoming). “All Schools are not Created Equal: Difference in Learning Environment in Small and Large High Schools,” Economics of Education Review.

Schwartz, Amy Ellen and Leanna Stiefel and Matthew Wiswall
06/03/2016

School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools

School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools
Stiefel, L, Elbel, B, Prescott, M.P., Anjea, S, & Schwartz, A. (Forthcoming November, 2016). “School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools,” Journal of School Health.

Stiefel, Leanna and Brian Elbel, Melissa Pflugh Prescott, Siddartha Anjea and Amy Schwartz
06/03/2016

Maternal Education and Child Mortality in Zimbabwe

Maternal Education and Child Mortality in Zimbabwe
10.1016/j.jhealeco.2015.08.003

Grépin, KA, Bharadwaj, P.
08/24/2015

In 1980, Zimbabwe rapidly expanded access to secondary schools, providing a natural experiment to estimate the impact of increased maternal secondary education on child mortality. Exploiting age specific exposure to these reforms, we find that children born to mothers most likely to have benefited from the policy were about 21% less likely to die than children born to slightly older mothers. We also find that increased education leads to delayed age at marriage, sexual debut, and first birth and that increased education leads to better economic opportunities for women. We find little evidence supporting other channels through which increased education might affect child mortality. Expanding access to secondary schools may greatly accelerate declines in child mortality in the developing world today.

Does Small High School Reform Lift Urban Districts? Evidence From New York City

Does Small High School Reform Lift Urban Districts? Evidence From New York City
Educational Researcher, Vol. XX No. X, pp. 1–12. DOI: 10.3102/0013189X15579187

Leanna Stiefel, Amy Ellen Schwartz, and Matthew Wiswall
04/29/2015

Research finds that small high schools deliver better outcomes than large high schools for urban students. An important outstanding question is whether this better performance is gained at the expense of losses elsewhere: Does small school reform lift the whole district? We explore New York City’s small high school reform in which hundreds of new small high schools were built in less than a decade. We use rich individual student data on four cohorts of New York City high school students and estimate effects of schools on student outcomes. Our results suggest that the introduction of small schools improved outcomes for students in all types of schools: large, small, continuously operating, and new. Small school reform lifted all boats.

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