Finance

Enrolling Children in Public Insurance: SCHIP, Medicaid, and State Implementation

Enrolling Children in Public Insurance: SCHIP, Medicaid, and State Implementation
Journal of Health Politics, Policy & Law; Jun 2004, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p451-489, 39p.

Kronebusch, K. & Elbel, B.
06/01/2004

The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 established federal grants to the states to create the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). This presented the states with a number of implementation choices concerning administrative models for the new programs, as well as choices about eligibility standards, enrollment simplification, crowd-out, and cost sharing requirements. At the same time, the states were also implementing welfare reform. We describe the most important of these implementation choices, and using data from the Current Population Survey, we estimate the impacts of state policy on enrollment in this multiprogram environment. The results indicate that SCHIP programs that are administered as Medicaid expansions are more successful than either separate SCHIP plans or combination programs in enrolling children. States that remove asset tests and implement presumptive eligibility and self-declaration of income have higher enrollment levels. Continuous eligibility and adoption of mail-in applications have no effect on overall enrollment. Waiting periods and premiums reduce enrollment. Stringent welfare reform reduces children's enrollment, despite federal policy that was intended to protect children from the consequences of welfare reform. The negative impacts of a number of these policy reforms substantially reduce enrollment, potentially offsetting the more favorable impacts of other policy choices. We estimate that if all states adopted the policy options that facilitate program use, enrollment for children with family incomes less than 200 percent of the poverty line could be raised from the current rate of 42 percent to 58 percent.

From Districts To Schools: The Distribution Of Resources Across Schools in Big City School Districts

From Districts To Schools: The Distribution Of Resources Across Schools in Big City School Districts
Symposium on Education Finance and Organization Structure in NYS Schools, Albany, NY, March

Schwartz, A.E., Stiefel, L. & Rubenstein, R.
03/01/2004

This paper explores the determinants of resource allocation across schools in large districts and examines options for improving resource distribution patterns. Previous research on intra-district allocations consistently reveals resource disparities across schools within districts, particularly in the distribution of teachers. While overall expenditures are sometimes related to the characteristics of students in schools, the ratio of teachers per pupil is consistently larger in high poverty, high-minority and low-performing schools. These teachers, though, generally have lower experience and education levels � and consequently, lower salaries � as compared to teachers in more advantaged schools. We explore these patterns in New York City, Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio by estimating de facto expenditure equations relating resource measures to school and student characteristics. Consistent with previous research, we find schools that have higher percentages of poor pupils receive more money and have more teachers per pupil, but the teachers tend to be less educated and less well paid, with a particularly consistent pattern in New York City schools. The paper concludes with policy options for changing intradistrict resource distributions in order to promote more efficient, more equitable or more effective use of resources. These options include allocating dollars rather than teacher positions to schools, providing teacher pay differentials in hard-to-staff schools and subjects, and adapting current district-based funding formulas to the school (and student) level.

City Taxes, City Spending: Essays in Honor of Dick Netzer

City Taxes, City Spending: Essays in Honor of Dick Netzer
Northampton, Mass: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.,

Schwartz, A.E.
01/01/2004

In a festschrift to Netzer a public finance economist well known for his research on state and local taxation, urban public services, and nonprofit organizations eight chapters apply microeconomics to problems facing urban areas and use statistical analysis to gain insight into practical solutions. The essays look at alternative methods of financing urban government, such as a land value tax and the impact of sales and income taxes on property taxation; at government expenditures, including housing subsidies; and at subsidies to nonprofit arts groups as well as the role of the nonprofit sector in providing K-12 education. Of interest to the fields of public finance, urban economics, and public administration.

Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting

Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting
Fifth Edition, by Ives, Razek, and Hosch, and Ives, Prentice-Hall (Fourth edition has been published in Chinese).

Ives, M., Razek, J. & Hosch, G.
01/01/2004

For use in Governmental Accounting, Not-for-Profit Accounting and Public Administration courses.
Covering the essentials of fund accounting and financial reporting, this flexible book introduces the reader to the basic accounting and reporting principles at work in both governmental and not-for-profit organizations. This easy-to-read book divides most of the chapters into independent sections, which may be covered as separate units.

Health Services Management: Readings, Cases and Commentary

Health Services Management: Readings, Cases and Commentary
Chicago: Health Administration Press, 8th edition,

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D.
01/01/2004

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks. This text-newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases-offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management that will help your students learn the role of manager in a healthcare organization.

Throughout its past editions, Health Services Management has featured the best literature on health services management to help learners understand the role of the manager, organizational design and control, the blending of organization and health professionals, change (adaptation), and responsiveness (accountability). This new edition continues that effort, and features new readings and classroom-tested cases.

The cases take place in a variety of organizations, including a faculty practice, a neighborhood health center, a small rural hospital, an HMO, as well as a variety of other settings. This book will prepare your future managers for the multitude of healthcare settings they could face in their careers.

Managing Tradeoffs

Managing Tradeoffs
in ID21, August 2004 issue. Special issue on "What role for microfinance? Reframing the questions."

Morduch, J.
01/01/2004

Achieving both profitability and strong social performance is the ultimate promise of microfinance. It is not impossible, but neither is it easy and few microlenders are there yet. Ten years ago it had been hoped that achieving both goals would simply be a matter of raising interest rates on loans. If borrowers were willing to pay, say, 50% interest per year for a loan, rather than 30%, the microlender’s profits would see an immediate boost, and, it was hoped, the well-being of clients would not be seriously hurt. Both parts of the claim are true up to a point, but increasing interest rates too high can bring financial and political difficulty and risk undermining social impacts.

Microfinance: Where Do We Stand?

Microfinance: Where Do We Stand?
Chapter included in Charles Goodhart, editor, Financial Development and Economic Growth: Explaining the Links. Basingstoke, Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan,

Morduch, J. & Armendariz de Aghion, B.
01/01/2004

The most successful economies have the best working financial markets. While causation obviously runs in both directions, current research has increasingly emphasized the role of finance in promoting growth. Here seven leading financial economists explore the links between financial development and growth. The book seeks to answer the question of the role of finance in promoting sustainable growth and in the reduction of poverty, for example via micro-financial institutions.

Reorganizing Primary Care at Mount Sinai Hospital

Reorganizing Primary Care at Mount Sinai Hospital
Health Services Management: Readings, Cases and Commentary, 8th ed.  Chicago, Health Administration Press,

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D.
01/01/2004

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks.

This text�newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases�offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management.

Throughout its past editions, Health Services Management has featured the best literature on health services management to help readers understand the role of the manager, organizational design and control, the blending of organization and health professionals, change (adaptation), and responsiveness (accountability). This new edition continues that effort, and features new readings.

The cases take place in a variety of organizations, including a faculty practice, a neighborhood health center, a small rural hospital, an HMO, as well as a variety of other settings.

Social and Environmental Dimensions of Cutting-Edge Infrastructures

Social and Environmental Dimensions of Cutting-Edge Infrastructures
in Moving People, Goods and Information in the 21st Century, edited by R. Hanley. UK: Routledge, pages 181-202.

Zimmerman, R.
01/01/2004

Globalization and technological innovation have changed the way people, goods, and information move through and about cities. To remain, or become, economically and environmentally sustainable, cities and their regions must adapt to these changes by creating cutting-edge infrastructures that integrate advanced technologies, communications, and multiple modes of transportation.

The book defines cutting-edge infrastructures, details their importance to cities and their regions, and addresses the obstacles - technical, jurisdictional, financial, and social - to creating those infrastructures. Additionally, it explores issues behind the creation of new infrastructures: their integrated, technical components, the decision making involved in their creation, and the equity and environmental questions they raise.

 

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