Finance

Health Policies for the 21st Century: Challenges and Recommendations for the USDHHS

Health Policies for the 21st Century: Challenges and Recommendations for the USDHHS
Milbank Memorial Fund, Fall

Boufford, J.I. & Lee, P.R.
01/01/2001

This report recommends a comprehensive reassessment of federal health policies, programs, and processes, including federal-state roles and relationships, and some immediate actions to promote and protect the nation's health and to provide leadership in world health. The report concentrates on the challenges facing the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) as the head of the lead health agency in the federal government. The federal government is responsible for five main functions related to health policy: financing; public health protection; collecting and disseminating information about U.S. health and health care delivery systems; capacity building for population health; and direct management of services.

Unlike the current categorical, or highly specialized, approach leading to policies and programs addressing the needs of a specific population, illness, or organizational constituency, a new, comprehensive approach to policy for the 21st century should promote coordinated efforts across programs in order to achieve three goals:

* create conditions that lead to longer, healthier lives for all Americans;
* eliminate health disparities;
* protect communities from avoidable health hazards and help them to address their own health problems.

 

Health Services Management: Readings and Commentary

Health Services Management: Readings and Commentary
Chicago, Health Administration Press, 7th edition,

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D. (eds.)
01/01/2001

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks. This text-newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases-offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management that will help your students learn the role of manager in a healthcare organization.

Local Property Taxation in Theory and Practice: Some Reflections

Local Property Taxation in Theory and Practice: Some Reflections
in Wallace E. Oates, editor, Property Taxation and Local Government Finance, Cambridge, MA: Lincoln Institute of Land Policy,

Netzer, D.
01/01/2001

The property tax is considered a most unpopular tax, among both scholars and taxpayers. Yet, recent research and analysis has proposed at least a partial rehabilitation of this tax and its role in the arena of local public finance. Based on a conference sponsored by the Lincoln Institute in January 2000, this book presents a systematic and comprehensive review of the economics of local property taxation and examines its policy implications. The ten papers and paired commentaries are written in a nontechnical form to make the findings available to a broad audience of policy makers and other noneconomists.

Measuring the Costs of Quality

Measuring the Costs of Quality
in Health Services Management: Readings and Commentary, Seventh Edition, A. Kovner and D. Neuhauser, editors, AUPHA Press/Health Administration Press, Chicago, IL, pp. 114-121.

Finkler, S.A.
01/01/2001

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks.

This book, newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases, offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management. Throughout its past editions, Health Services Management has featured the best literature on health services management to help readers understand the role of the manager, organizational design and control, the blending of organization and health professionals, change (adaptation), and responsiveness (accountability). This edition continues that effort, and features new readings.

 

Microenterprise Development for Better Health Outcomes

Microenterprise Development for Better Health Outcomes
Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing.

Rodriguez-Garcia, R., Macinko, J. & Waters, W.
01/01/2001

Showing that economic development and public health, often thought of as distinct, are both interdependent and dependent on social and political conditions, this book provides a new appreciation of the close relationship between microenterprise development and health in developing countries. Many of the world's poor earn a living from microenterprises, often outside the formal economy, and international practitioners have recently turned their attention to this underground economy, providing support through group poverty lending and village banking models, but overlooking the potential benefits of linking income generation with public health. This book argues for a conceptual and practical relationship between microenterprise development and household health, nutrition, and sanitation. To support their framework, the authors look at specific actions for harnessing the power of microeconomic development to improve health and human development. They support their argument further with case studies of innovative programs carried out in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. The book challenges the reader to cross disciplinary and professional boundaries to not only understand the interrelationships between health and income generation but to use available tools to enhance those interrelationships.

Factors influencing participation in weekly support groups among women completing an HIV/STD Intervention program

Factors influencing participation in weekly support groups among women completing an HIV/STD Intervention program
Women and Health 2000; 30(1): 15-35

Van Devanter, N., Parikh, N., Cohall, R., Faber, N., Litwak, E., Messeri, P., Gonzales, V., Kruger, S. & Greenberg, J.
01/01/2000

Over the past three decades, the influence and importance of social support has been well documented and the findings have suggested a beneficial effect on stress-related situations, mental and physical health, and social functioning. More recently, small group/skills training behavioral interventions have demonstrated success in changing behaviors which affect the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV among populations at risk for these diseases. Studies of support groups to date have been conducted exclusively in research settings where women are offered financial incentives for participation. Little is known about the willingness of women to participate in ongoing support groups after successfully completing a skills training intervention. The present study examines the factors that may influence participation among women in a weekly support group after completing a structured, six session HIV/STD intervention. Both quantitative and qualitative data are collected from 265 women in the intervention arm of a multi-site randomized controlled behavioral intervention trial. Results reveal that less than a quarter (22%) of women participated in at least one support group. Participation varied significantly by site, ranging from 34% to 15% (p = .008). Participation was also strongly linked to recent use of domestic violence services. Qualitative data indicated that although monetary incentives play some role in the woman's decision to participate, other factors are also important. These include program outreach, support group size, salience of the group content, consistency of group leadership from the intervention to the support group, and use of peer leaders along with professional facilitators. Implications for design of post-intervention support groups programs are discussed.

Financial Management for Nurse Managers and Executives

Financial Management for Nurse Managers and Executives
2nd Edition, W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia,

Finkler, S.A. & Kovner, C.T.
01/01/2000

Covering the financial topics all nurse managers need to know and use, this book explains how financial management fits into the healthcare organization. You'll study accounting principles, cost analysis, planning and control management of the organization's financial resources, and the use of management tools.

High School Size: The Effects on Budgets and Performance in New York City

High School Size: The Effects on Budgets and Performance in New York City
Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Spring

Stiefel, L., Berne, R., Iatarola, P. & Fruchter, N.
01/01/2000

Combines budget and performance information to study the effects of high school size. Suggests that since small high schools are more effective for minority and poor students, and the budget per student is found to be similar for small and large schools, policymakers might support the creation of more small high schools.

Microfinance Beyond Group Lending

Microfinance Beyond Group Lending
with Beatriz Armendariz de Aghion. The Economics of Transition 8 (2) 2000: 401-420.

Morduch, J.
01/01/2000

Studies the mechanisms that allows microfinance programs to successfully penetrate new segments of credit markets. Repayment rates from low-income borrowers; Microfinance in transition economies; Non-refinancing threats; Features of microfinance credit contracts.

Perceived Family and Peer Transactions and Self-Esteem Among Urban Early Adolescents

Perceived Family and Peer Transactions and Self-Esteem Among Urban Early Adolescents
Journal of Early Adolescence, 20(1), 68-92,

Roberts, A., Seidman, E., Pedersen, S., Chesir-Teran, D., Allen, L., Aber, J.L., Duran, V. & Hsueh, J.
01/01/2000

This research extends previous work that identified groups of youth characterized by profiles of perceived family and peer transactions. Predictions derived from self-enhancement and self-consistency theories concerning how such transactions might relate to self-esteem in a diverse sample of early adolescents (N = 635) were investigated. Both theories indicate independent contributions of family and peer transactions to self-esteem. The theories differ, however, with regard to implications for how the two microsystems might interrelate in their linkages with self-esteem, with self-enhancement theory implying a moderational model and self-consistency theory a mediational model. As predicted, family and peer profiles each made independent contributions to the prediction of self-esteem. Consistent with self-consistency theory, the relations of family transactions to self-esteem were mediated in part by their associations with peer transactions, with particularly strong linkages evident between qualitatively similar profiles of family and peer experiences. Support for a moderational model, however, was not found.

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