Diana Salas
Chief Researcher, Women of Color Policy Network

Diana Salas, Chief Researcher for the Network, received a BA from Queens College and MPA from NYU Wagner (2003). She was a graduate research assistant for the Network. Previously, Diana worked at NY ACORN (Association of Communities Organizations for Reform Now) and on various political and social justice campaigns.

Date Publication/Paper
2009

Mason, C.N. & Salas, D. 2009. Making Ends Meet: Women and Poverty in New York City
Abstract

 In March 2009, The Network in collaboration with the New York Women's Foundation will release a new report on women living in poverty in New York City.  The dynamic study will include qualitative data as well as narratives from women about the impact of poverty on communities and families.  The report will help inform funding priorities for the Foundation.

2007

Women of Color Policy Network 2007. Race Realities in New York City
View/Download Article | Race Realities
Abstract

This shadow report was released in partnership with the Human Rights Project of the Urban Justice Center on International Human Rights Day ( Dec 10, 2007). The report highlight the persistent discrimination experienced by people of color and immigrants in New York City and brings attention to the failure of the City to meet its full obligations under CERD. The report was submitted to the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.

2003

Walter Stafford, Diana Salas, Melissa Mendez 2003. Gender, Race, Class and Welfare Reform Roundtable of Institutions of People of Color and the Women of Color Policy Newtwork
View/Download Article | Welfare Report
Abstract

This study on welfare reform contends that race and gender coalesce through historic and contemporary government, policy and market failures to deny benefits and jobs to women of color while blaming them for their condition. It is divided into three sections: the first addresses national policy trends with an emphasis on race and gender, the second looks at New York City, and the third offers recommendations. The report was published in the National Urban League's State of Black America, 2003.

Stafford, W.W. with Salas, D. & Mendez, M. 2003. Gender, Race,Class and Welfare Reform State of Black America. National Urban League, Aug
View/Download Article | View article
Abstract

This study on welfare reform contends that race and gender coalesce through historic and contemporary government, policy and market failures to deny benefits and jobs to women of color while blaming them for their condition. It is divided into three sections: the first addresses national policy trends with an emphasis on race and gender, the second looks at New York City, and the third offers recommendations. The report was published in the National Urban League's State of Black America, 2003.

Stafford, Walter & Salas, Diana 2003. Second Annual Status of Women of Color Report: Women of Color in New York City: Still Invisible in Policy Women of Color Policy Network Roundtable of Institutions of People of Color
View/Download Article | View article
Abstract

Demography is not destiny. While groups of color - Asians, Blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans - have emerged as New York City's new majority, large segments of the groups remain burdened by many of the historical problems associated with disadvantaged minorities. This report highlights the problems faced by lower-income women of color, especially single mothers. Often bypassed during the economic boom of the 1990s, these women have found that employment opportunities have all but evaporated in the current economic malaise. The elimination of federal welfare entitlements have only served to exacerbate these problems. To read more click on the link below.

Stafford, W.W. & Salas, D. 2003. Women Of Color In New York City:Still Invisible In Policy Second Annual Status of Women of Color Report.
View/Download Article | View article
Abstract

Demography is not destiny. While groups of color - Asians, Blacks, Latinos, and Native Americans - have emerged as New York City's new majority, large segments of the groups remain burdened by many of the historical problems associated with disadvantaged minorities. This report highlights the problems faced by lower-income women of color, especially single mothers. Often bypassed during the economic boom of the 1990s, these women have found that employment opportunities have all but evaporated in the current economic malaise. The elimination of federal welfare entitlements have only served to exacerbate these problems. To read more click on the link below.