MPA-PNP

"The Hidden Lives of America’s Poor and Middle Class”

"The Hidden Lives of America’s Poor and Middle Class”

Jonathan Morduch, Professor of Public Policy and Economics at NYU Wagner, has co-written an article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, describing the U.S. Financial Diaries project he leads. The ongoing project deeply explores the financial lives of individual American families of lower and middle income levels. It illuminates, in part, the phenomenon of unsteady household income and expenses, and how this volatility can hamper the ability of working families to gain economic stability and upward mobility. At the same time, the project shows that financial products, programs and policies created to help working households are sometimes ill-suited to the day-to-day challenges these households actually face – whether they are living below or well above the poverty line.

Professor Morduch is Executive Director the Financial Access Initiative, a consortium of researchers focused on the most pressing issues of financial inclusion in the U.S. and in developing countries. He created the U.S. Financial Diaries project with colleagues Rachel Schneider – with whom he co-authored the article – and NYU Wagner graduate Daryl Collins (PhD, 2010).

'Nest' Program for Autistic Kids Grows

'Nest' Program for Autistic Kids Grows

Dorothy Siegel of NYU's Institute for Education and Social Policy helped the city Department of Education to create the "Nest" program for autistic children in 2003. According to a May 25, 2007, article in the New York Daily News, this successful program, which puts kids with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the same class with other students, is growing. Come September, it will be available to 200 kids. Once it is implemented across the city, it could benefit as many as 2,000 children.

Founded in 1995, the Institute for Education and Social Policy is a partnership between the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. It conducts scientific research about U.S. education and related social policy issues to help inform educational institutions about the effectiveness of instructional programs, the impact of school reform initiatives, and the relationships between academic achievement, school finance and socio-economic and demographic factors such as poverty, ethnicity and immigration status. It is led by Wagner Professors Amy Ellen Schwartz (director) and Leanna Stiefel (associate director).

To read the article, click below.

2002 Alumnus Who Advised Newark Mayor Goes to Washington

2002 Alumnus Who Advised Newark Mayor Goes to Washington

After working for more than four years alongside Mayor Cory Booker to improve public education in the City of Newark, NYU Wagner alumnus De'Shawn Wright (MPA '02) has garnered an exciting new position in public service -- he has been named the new deputy mayor for education by Washington, D.C., Mayor-elect Vincent Gray. The Mayor-elect was quoted referring to Wright and another new appointee as "top-notch professionals" in policy and management for large and complex urban school systems.

Gray chose Wright, who formerly worked for the New York City Department of Education, on the strength partly of his school reform work in Newark, N.J. In addition, Wright served as a partner with the Newark Charter School Fund, which was successful in gathering support to help fund the city's charter schools.

Since graduating from Wagner, Wright has returned to Wagner on numerous occasions, including in 2009 for a public event with Mayor Booker. We wish him well as he begins his latest leadership position.

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