policy

Leaders of White House Initiative Take Aim at Achievement Gap at NYU Wagner Event

Leaders of White House Initiative Take Aim at Achievement Gap at NYU Wagner Event

More than 150 people attended “Bridging the Gap,” a panel discussion at NYU Wagner featuring leaders of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence and other change makers.

The forum on policy and practice opportunities to narrow the achievement gap for students of color was organized by the school’s Wagner Education Policy Student Association; the Association of Latin@s and Allies in Public Service; and the Black Student Association.

Among the panelists was David Johns, Executive Director, White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans, who emphasized that programs in early childhood learning and high school dropout prevention are important levers for improving educational outcomes for people of color.

Involvement at the community-based level is also key, he said.

“Policy is but a tool,” explained Johns. “How do we leverage to ensure every adult who meets our children has the competency and the support to get them where they need to go?”

In addition to Johns, the panelists at "Bridging the Gap: Actualizing Educational Achievement for Students of Color," included:

Marco Davis, Deputy Director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics

Khemeneck Patin, Senior Policy Advisor for the NYC Young Men’s Initiative

Derrell Bradford, Executive Director for the New York Campaign for Achievement Now

Jessica Coffrin-St. Julien, Board Member and Governance Committee Chair for MASA New York

The October 30 discussion in the Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue was moderated by NYU Steinhardt's Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership Dr. Edward Fergus.

               

Light Pens Oped on Katrina's Lesson in Readiness for Washington Post

Light Pens Oped on Katrina's Lesson in Readiness for Washington Post

"Even as the Gulf Coast states battle to recover from Hurricane Katrina, Washington should take heed of the chaos surrounding the early relief effort," writes Paul Light in today's Washington Post. "If this is what happens when the nation has two days of advance warning, imagine the aftermath of a surprise attack using a chemical, biological or nuclear device."

Lt. Gov. Ravitch sizes up state deficit at Rudin Center forum

Lt. Gov. Ravitch sizes up state deficit at Rudin Center forum

Lt. Gov. Richard Ravitch and Prof. Charles Brecher

     "Lt. Gov. Richard Ravitch's appearance at an NYU forum yesterday was overbooked almost as soon as it was announced, and the audience wasn't disappointed as Gov. Paterson's No. 2 let loose on a variety of subjects." So began a Crain's Insider dispatch on Ravitch's bracing, widely reported discussion Oct. 28, 2009, at NYU Wagner on New York State's huge budget challenges and the implications for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which he formerly headed, the $2 transit fare, and the controversial idea of introducing East River bridge tolls.

     Ravitch, a major figure in the development of fiscal practices in the city and state since 1970s, offered his assessments with Wagner's Professor Charles Brecher (moderator) as a guest of the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, housed at the school, and the Center's director, Anthony Shorris, who previously headed the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. "The State of New York," Ravitch said, "has in the remainder of this fiscal year a deficit of $4 billion--$3 or $4; people argue about it," he said, speaking to students and transportation professionals at NYU's Rudin Center for Transportation Policy. "Next year it's between $7 and $8 [billion], assuming revenues level off. The year after that, when the stimulus bill no loner provides any one-shots for the State of New York, the deficit will be between $15 and $18 billion. These are numbers that are unprecedented."

Hear the full discussion in the Wagner Podcast.

 

 

 

 

 

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